'Common courtesy': Whitehorse mayor asks citizens to pick up after their dogs

·2 min read
Mayor Laura Cabott posted a message on the city Facebook account last week calling on city dog owners to pick up after their pets on the city's trails. (Michel Proulx/CBC - image credit)
Mayor Laura Cabott posted a message on the city Facebook account last week calling on city dog owners to pick up after their pets on the city's trails. (Michel Proulx/CBC - image credit)

It happens.

But perhaps a little too often around Whitehorse.

Mayor Laura Cabott posted a video on the city's Facebook account last week calling on city dog owners to pick up after their pets.

"You know, dog poop actually takes 12 months to decompose. It's certainly not fertilizer. And it can actually carry parasites and bacteria that is not good for other dogs or children if they get into it," she said in the video.

"And, you know, frankly, it's just common courtesy to our fellow citizens to make sure that we pick up after our dogs."

The mayor said that as the snow melted, the city started receiving comments from residents primarily about two issues: potholes and dog poop.

As a dog owner herself who uses the trails, Cabott decided to do a video.

"I thought [my dog] Gertie and I will do a video, just to educate folks a little bit about what's going on out there," she said.

"It's just sort of a fun way to encourage people to pick up and take pride in our city," she said.

She said it's easy to neglect picking up after your dog, especially in the winter.

"It's a little hard to get [poop] off the trail, but when it starts to melt, it is unsightly," she said.

Cabott added there may be a little more dog poop than usual on the trails this year, and thinks that one of the reasons may be because more people adopted dogs during the pandemic.

She said that while dog poop is not a "five-alarm concern that we have in the city," she believes residents can do better.

Cabott said another reason people may not be as diligent as before may have to do with the fact plastic bags are not available from grocery stores anymore.

But she said the city has 50 dispensers of compostable bags people can use to pick their dog's poop.

"If there's particular areas where there's really a lot of traffic with people walking their dogs and there's no dispenser, let us know and we'll look at adding more and ensuring that the bags are in the dispensers," she said.

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