COVID-19 on P.E.I.: What's happening Wednesday, April 21

·3 min read
A health-care worker prepares a shot of COVID-19 vaccine for administration.  (AHS - image credit)
A health-care worker prepares a shot of COVID-19 vaccine for administration. (AHS - image credit)

Nearly three-quarters of Health PEI's 6,000 staff members have received at least one dose of COVID-19 vaccine, Prince Edward Island's premier said in the legislature Wednesday.

A Summerside native who's managing a health-care team at a west Toronto hospital says fears of not being able to cope with COVID-19 patients were not realized last year, but the third wave of the pandemic is proving they were justified.

COVID-19 logistics have led to too many moves for Queen Elizabeth Hospital patients living with dementia, says a Liberal MLA.

The North Shore community of North Rustico is cancelling most of its major Canada Day events this year to comply with public health restrictions.

This year's UPEI nursing graduates have a lot of options to choose from as they enter the workforce.

Michael MacKinnon, who is about to graduate from the UPEI nursing program, has accepted a job at the Queen Elizabeth Hospital's Unit 1.
Michael MacKinnon, who is about to graduate from the UPEI nursing program, has accepted a job at the Queen Elizabeth Hospital's Unit 1.(Submitted by Michael MacKinnon)

Nurses in Atlantic Canada are being asked to help as the third wave of the COVID-19 pandemic hits Ontario hard — and some on P.E.I. are starting to step forward.

The child who was hospitalized due to COVID-19 has been discharged, the Chief Public Health Office confirmed. It also reported one new case of COVID-19.

The 2021 edition of the Cavendish Beach Music Festival has been cancelled, after organizers decided public health requirements would still not permit a large-scale event by the time the July 9-11 weekend rolled around.

About 25,000 people attended the Cavendish Beach Music Festival in 2019.
About 25,000 people attended the Cavendish Beach Music Festival in 2019.(Tracy Lightfoot/CBC)

Nova Scotia is placing new restrictions on who can travel to the province, with exceptions for residents of Prince Edward Island and Newfoundland and Labrador, where COVID-19 case counts are low.

A P.E.I. tourism operator is concerned that the federal budget is decreasing support for the industry.

Liberal MP Sean Casey says the support will be there if it is needed.

The Island has seen 174 cases of COVID-19. Thirteen are considered active. There have been two hospitalizations and no deaths.

Elsewhere in the Atlantic region Wednesday:

Also in the news

These Islanders are currently eligible for a vaccine

  • People over 50.

  • Frontline workers over the age of 40 who interact with the public and cannot work virtually.

  • People providing health care services to the public — including optometrists, pharmacists, physiotherapists, occupational therapists — and their support staff.

  • Non-frontline health care workers needed to maintain health care system capacity

  • Firefighters, police officers, power-line workers.

  • Residents and staff of long-term care homes.

  • Adults living in Indigenous communities.

  • Residents and staff of shared living facilities.

  • Truck drivers and other rotational workers.

You can find more information about how to get a vaccine here.

Further resources

Reminder about symptoms

The symptoms of COVID-19 can include:

  • Fever.

  • Cough or worsening of a previous cough.

  • Possible loss of taste and/or smell.

  • Sore throat.

  • New or worsening fatigue.

  • Headache.

  • Shortness of breath.

  • Runny nose.

More from CBC P.E.I.