COVID-19 on P.E.I.: What's happening Saturday April 24

·2 min read
Prince Edward Island is imposing new travel restrictions because of rising COVID-19 case numbers in the Atlantic region. (CBC  - image credit)
Prince Edward Island is imposing new travel restrictions because of rising COVID-19 case numbers in the Atlantic region. (CBC - image credit)

Prince Edward Island imposed new travel restrictions late Friday because of rising COVID-19 case numbers in the Atlantic region.

People travelling within the Atlantic region on a same-day exemption from having to isolate for 14 days are the most affected.

The stress of the pandemic may be complicating matters for some couples, but experts say there are ways to have productive conversations.

Online gambling, which the province agreed to launch during the pandemic, is associated with higher levels of risky gambling behaviour and harm according to a report commissioned by Atlantic Lottery Corporation and obtained by CBC News.

The province announced it would slightly extend hours at its Borden-Carleton COVID-19 testing site, after some P.E.I. truckers complained about lack of access to testing, saying clinic hours do not recognize the reality of the hours they are working.

P.E.I. is about a week away from the start of another lobster season during the COVID-19 pandemic, and feeling much more comfortable about facing the challenges.

The 2021 East Coast Music Awards scheduled for May 5-9 in Sydney, N.S., will now be held virtually.

The federal government will send double the amount of Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine to P.E.I. expected in May and June.

P.E.I. reported no new cases of COVID-19 Friday. There are 11 active cases and 175 cases since the pandemic began 13 months ago.There have been two hospitalizations and no deaths.

Elsewhere in the Atlantic region Friday:

Also in the news

These Islanders are currently eligible for a vaccine

  • People over 50.

  • Frontline workers over 16 who interact with the public and cannot work virtually.

  • People providing health care services to the public — including optometrists, pharmacists, physiotherapists, occupational therapists — and their support staff.

  • Non-frontline health care workers needed to maintain health care system capacity

  • Firefighters, police officers, power-line workers.

  • Residents and staff of long-term care homes.

  • Adults living in Indigenous communities.

  • Residents and staff of shared living facilities.

  • Truck drivers and other rotational workers.

You can find more information about how to get a vaccine here.

Further resources

Reminder about symptoms

The symptoms of COVID-19 can include:

  • Fever.

  • Cough or worsening of a previous cough.

  • Possible loss of taste and/or smell.

  • Sore throat.

  • New or worsening fatigue.

  • Headache.

  • Shortness of breath.

  • Runny nose.

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