Cross-border law enforcement collaboration focuses on disappearance of Mekayla Bali

·2 min read
Kam-Way Transportation in partnership with Washington State Patrol’s Missing and Unidentified Persons Unit places age-advanced photos on semi-trailers that travel across North America in hopes of generating leads to help find missing children. (Washington State Patrol  - image credit)
Kam-Way Transportation in partnership with Washington State Patrol’s Missing and Unidentified Persons Unit places age-advanced photos on semi-trailers that travel across North America in hopes of generating leads to help find missing children. (Washington State Patrol - image credit)

It's been more than six years since Mekayla Bali disappeared.

The then 16-year-old was last seen on April 12, 2016 in Yorkton, Sask.

On Wednesday, Washington State Patrol and Saskatchewan RCMP unveiled new Homeward Bound trucks in Blaine, Wash., that feature Mekayla.

The Homeward Bound program is a collaboration between Kam-Way Transportation and Washington State Patrol's Missing and Unidentified Persons Unit. It places age-advanced photos on semi-trailers that travel across North America in hopes of generating leads to help find missing children.

CBC
CBC

"Approximately 800 tips from all over the world have been reported to police in relation to our investigation into Mekayla's disappearance, including tips and information reported from Washington," Corp. Robert Head of the Saskatchewan RCMP Major Crimes Unit said in a news release.

"These tips have been followed up on by investigators. Mekayla has not been found and is still considered missing."

There have been several tips that centred the search for her in Vancouver, B.C., and also in Seattle, Wash., and Portland, Ore.

Putting Mekayla's information and photo on the trucks helps remind the public of her disappearance with the aim of generating new tips or sightings.

Washington State Patrol
Washington State Patrol

Washington State Patrol Chief John R. Batiste is hopeful the cross-border collaboration will help locate Mekayla.

"Partnerships in missing persons cases occur regularly with border states and Canada, but it's not an automatic process," Batiste said in a news release. "It requires leadership, outreach and communications to make this happen."

"All it takes is one key piece of information that will help push this investigation forward so we can bring Mekayla home to her family," added Head.

The Homeward Bound program was started in 2005 by the late Trooper Renee Padgett.

The program has featured 32 missing children and youth to date, three of whom have since been recovered.

Anyone with information regarding Mekayla's disappearance is asked to call 1-800-843-5678.

Our goal is to create a safe and engaging place for users to connect over interests and passions. In order to improve our community experience, we are temporarily suspending article commenting