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Fender CD-60SCE Acoustic Guitar

Many, if not most, guys wish they had some guitar chops. Fact is, your favorite dad is only three chords and a little practice away from a quality pastime, if not actual campfire glory. Fender’s CD-60SCE features a built-in tuner and pickup, an easy-play rosewood fingerboard for the lightly callused beginning to intermediate player, and cutaway design for advanced shredding. $299

Dad’s Wish List for Father’s Day

After a long year of working, changing diapers, driving kids to hockey practice at dawn, and/or prioritizing tuition payments over trips to Aruba, most dads are probably happy on Father’s Day just to go out to brunch, kick back and watch some sports or grill in the yard, and spend some time with the family — that’s what’s really special.

But there’s nothing wrong with hooking him up with some sweet gear.

So click about for some father-tested and -approved items — apparel, exercise equipment, spirits, plenty of golf gear — that are more or less guaranteed to put a little extra smile on your favorite dad’s face. —Ken Gee

Follow us on Instagram, Facebook, and Pinterest for nonstop inspiration delivered fresh to your feed, every day. For Twitter updates, follow @YahooStyle and @YahooBeauty.

  • Canada deemed U.S. a safe country for asylum seekers after internal review
    News
    The Canadian Press

    Canada deemed U.S. a safe country for asylum seekers after internal review

    Canadian immigration officials have determined that the United States remains a safe country for asylum seekers, despite the Trump administration's crackdown on what it terms illegal aliens. Documents obtained by The Canadian Press under access-to-information law show Canada was concerned about the changes in U.S. immigration policy and conducted a review of its Safe Third Country agreement with the U.S. from January to March of 2017.

  • What life is like inside the Okimaw Ohci Healing Lodge housing child killer Terri-Lynne McClintic
    News
    CBC

    What life is like inside the Okimaw Ohci Healing Lodge housing child killer Terri-Lynne McClintic

    Nestled among the rolling hills of southwestern Saskatchewan, several wooden cabins surrounded by autumn barren trees make up what is known as the Okimaw Ohci Healing Lodge. It's operated by the Corrections Canada to house incarcerated women, including 28-year-old Terri-Lynne McClintic — the convicted killer of eight-year-old Tori Stafford, whose death and disappearance captured national attention after police scoured the southwestern Ontario countryside for months in one of the largest-ever searches for a missing person in Canada. McClintic's transfer from an Ontario medium-security prison to Okimaw Ohci not even halfway through her life sentence has sparked national outrage, but advocates for the healing lodge are defending its effectiveness to rehabilitate offenders.

  • Ten communities to watch as municipal elections are held in Ontario
    News
    The Canadian Press

    Ten communities to watch as municipal elections are held in Ontario

    Voters across Ontario are casting ballots today to elect their next municipal governments. Canada's most populous city initially appeared set for a sleepy election with no significant challenger to incumbent Mayor John Tory, and a 47-ward structure in place. The city's former chief planner Jennifer Keesmaat joined the mayoral race, becoming Tory's main competitor.

  • 'It was his issue from the beginning,' Premier Moe's two year carbon tax crusade
    News
    CBC

    'It was his issue from the beginning,' Premier Moe's two year carbon tax crusade

    On October 3, 2016, Scott Moe walked out of a meeting of provincial and federal environment ministers in Montreal as it was in progress. Moe was Saskatchewan's environment minister at the time. Instead, Prime Minister Trudeau announced that provinces needed to adopt a carbon tax or cap and trade system by 2018 or the federal government would impose one.

  • These are Ontario's most hotly-contested municipal elections
    News
    CBC

    These are Ontario's most hotly-contested municipal elections

    Municipal elections take place across Ontario on Monday. The race in Steeltown is boiling down to a scrap over light rapid transit, and the promised $1 billion in provincial funding to build it. Hamilton's incumbent mayor Fred Eisenberger is in a dead heat with newcomer Vito Sgro, according to the one published poll about the race.

  • Several earthquakes strike off Vancouver Island, with no reports of damage
    News
    CBC

    Several earthquakes strike off Vancouver Island, with no reports of damage

    A series of three large earthquakes have struck off the coast of British Columbia, according to the United States Geological Survey. The first struck just before 11 p.m. PT Sunday, around 190 km southwest of Port Hardy, a town on the northeast end of Vancouver Island. The first quake, reported as a magnitude 6.5, was followed by another, with a magnitude of 6.8, around 40 minutes later.

  • Uber to appeal Singapore's competition watchdog decision on Grab deal
    News
    Reuters

    Uber to appeal Singapore's competition watchdog decision on Grab deal

    Last month, Singapore slapped ride-hailing firms Grab and Uber with fines and imposed restrictions on their businesses to open up the market to competitors, after concluding that their merger had driven up prices. It fined Grab S$6.42 million ($4.7 million) and Uber S$6.58 million. Uber said it was making the appeal independently of Grab, as a matter of principle.

  • Iqaluit student sits during national anthem to make statement about residential school curriculum
    News
    CBC

    Iqaluit student sits during national anthem to make statement about residential school curriculum

    A 12-year-old student in Iqaluit says he ended up in the principal's office after he sat during the Canadian anthem to make a statement about how the history of residential schools is taught. "I guess I just wanted to make a statement for... changes in school," Miles Brewster said. "Like more education about the past… like what happened to the First Nations and Inuit.

  • Canada Post hit by rotating strikes in Victoria, Edmonton, Halifax, Windsor, Ont.
    News
    CBC

    Canada Post hit by rotating strikes in Victoria, Edmonton, Halifax, Windsor, Ont.

    The union representing 50,000 Canada Post employees has begun a series of rotating strikes in four cities. The Canadian Union of Postal Workers says the 24-hour strikes began Monday at 12:01 a.m. ET in Windsor, Ont., and at 1:01 a.m. AT in Halifax. "We've done everything we could to try and reach an agreement and they're not just getting it into their heads that we're serious about the things we've been discussing," said Tony Rogers, president of the Nova Local of the Canadian Union of Postal Workers.

  • Ireland says Brexit transition extension can't be alternative to Irish backstop: newspaper
    News
    Reuters

    Ireland says Brexit transition extension can't be alternative to Irish backstop: newspaper

    An extension to Britain's post-Brexit transition period cannot be an alternative to the "backstop" agreement governing the Irish border, Ireland's foreign minister was quoted as saying on Monday by the Irish Times newspaper. "There will be no withdrawal agreement without the backstop, end of story," Coveney was quoted by the newspaper as saying when asked about a suggestion by Brexit minister Dominic Raab on Sunday that an extension could be an alternative to the backstop.

  • Canada's legal cannabis market needs 2 years to stabilize: analyst
    Global News

    Canada's legal cannabis market needs 2 years to stabilize: analyst

    Supply shortages caused cannabis prices to spike in parts of Canada following legalization on Oct. 17. Ryan Kessler reports.

  • Japan tells Facebook to improve data protection
    News
    Reuters

    Japan tells Facebook to improve data protection

    Japan's government on Monday told U.S. technology firm Facebook Inc to better protect its users' personal data following lapses this year affecting tens of millions of people globally. The request comes after Facebook this month said attackers stole data from 29 million user accounts. Japan's Personal Information Protection Commission, which investigated the Cambridge Analytica incident with authorities in Britain and elsewhere, issued a statement on Monday detailing its request to Facebook.

  • Edmonton bikers support teenager struggling with severe mental illness
    News
    CBC

    Edmonton bikers support teenager struggling with severe mental illness

    An Edmonton boy is still struggling to get the mental health support he needs, after his story was made public earlier this month. A pack of about 45 motorcycles rolled up to his home on Sunday afternoon in a show of solidarity as he struggles with post-traumatic stress disorder, anxiety and depression triggered by severe bullying. Biker groups Bullying Enns and Bikers Against Bullying took him for a ride around the city's south end and the meet up wasn't their first interaction.

  • Road to K'atl'odeeche wrecking cars and hurting business, residents say
    News
    CBC

    Road to K'atl'odeeche wrecking cars and hurting business, residents say

    The road off of Highway 5 to K'atl'odeeche First Nation is littered with signs warning drivers of loose gravel and rough surfaces — and according to residents, it's been that way for a long time and they want change.

  • Hawkesbury fire department's performance 'substandard' in fatal fire
    News
    CBC

    Hawkesbury fire department's performance 'substandard' in fatal fire

    The performance of the fire department in Hawkesbury, Ont., during a retirement home fire that killed an elderly couple was "substandard" and "inadequately managed," according to the findings of an internal police report. The report, commissioned by the Ontario Provincial Police and obtained by CBC News under a freedom of information request, concerns how the department responded to the May 25, 2012 fire at Place Mont-Roc at 100 Industriel Blvd. The fire's cause is still under investigation by the Ontario Fire Marshal's office, but the OPP's crime unit commissioned CFT Engineering Inc. to provide their own analysis.

  • Man left outside of hospital as infant hopes to see Angel Cradle in Saskatoon
    News
    CBC

    Man left outside of hospital as infant hopes to see Angel Cradle in Saskatoon

    Sanctum Care Group has been looking at providing such a cradle, to allow mothers to leave their newborn babies in a safe location. For some mothers, that means parenting their babies, for others, it means adoption, and in some rare circumstances, it may mean leaving a newborn in a safe place in a way where the mother's anonymity can be preserved, he said.

  • Placer miners and mining company in dispute over access to Yukon claims
    News
    CBC

    Placer miners and mining company in dispute over access to Yukon claims

    Two placer miners in central Yukon say they're being bulldozed by a mining company that's developing a major gold mine. Kelly Benson and Joe Volf say their placer claims have been made inaccessible by upgrades to the road that leads to the Eagle Gold Mine about 80 kilometres north of Mayo, Yukon. Victoria Gold is hoping to begin producing gold next year at the open pit mine.

  • We could soon upload dashcam evidence directly to police, but are we ready for what that means?
    News
    CBC

    We could soon upload dashcam evidence directly to police, but are we ready for what that means?

    When you head out on Calgary roads these days, smile — odds are, you're on camera. More and more people are using dashcams to document their daily travels, and that means a growing number of traffic offences are being caught on video. In response, Calgary police are now considering a new way to accept — and handle — all that video.

  • Telefonica Deutschland calls for regulators to block Vodafone-Liberty deal
    News
    Reuters

    Telefonica Deutschland calls for regulators to block Vodafone-Liberty deal

    The head of Telefonica Deutschland called on Monday for EU regulators to block Vodafone's planned acquisition of Liberty Global, saying it would lead to a "quasi-monopolisation" of the German cable TV market. Britain's Vodafone agreed in May to pay $21.8 billion to buy Liberty Global's assets in Europe, with the main prize being Germany's Unitymedia, but still needs regulators' approval.

  • State of ski jump facility at Winsport Canada an embarrassment, says city councillor
    News
    CBC

    State of ski jump facility at Winsport Canada an embarrassment, says city councillor

    Well, looking at it from the coach's platform, Todd Stretch, the president of Ski Jumping Canada, says it's locked. "WinSport has told us it's quarantined, so we're not allowed. CBC News reached out to former Canadian Olympic ski jumper Horst Bulau, who lives in Toronto, with pictures of the complex.

  • Complaint leads to lower water bills for some northeast Calgary residents
    News
    CBC

    Complaint leads to lower water bills for some northeast Calgary residents

    Warren Rempel has discovered that maybe you can fight city hall. For several months, Rempel has been complaining to Enmax and to the City of Calgary about his water bill. After finding information on the city's website, he phoned Enmax to question why he was being charged the multi-family rate but not the residential rate.

  • 'Braiding Western science and Indigenous knowledge': New environmental monitoring program launches
    News
    CBC

    'Braiding Western science and Indigenous knowledge': New environmental monitoring program launches

    A new college program aims to combine Indigenous traditional knowledge and modern science to empower the next generation of environmental monitors in the oilsands. Keyano College launched the program in October and its first group of 11 students are studying in Fort Chipewyan, Alta. Fort Chipewyan is a Cree, Dene and Métis community located north of Fort McMurray.

  • Imperial Oil restarts Norman Wells crude output after pipeline repairs
    News
    CBC

    Imperial Oil restarts Norman Wells crude output after pipeline repairs

    Imperial Oil Ltd. has restarted oil production at Norman Wells in the Northwest Territories almost two years after being forced to suspend shipments on a pipeline threatened by slope stability concerns at a Mackenzie River crossing near Fort Simpson. The Calgary-based company says it has been shipping oil from storage since last month on Enbridge Inc.'s Line 21 pipeline, which extends from Norman Wells into northern Alberta.

  • Plaque initiative connects Westmount residents with neighbourhood history
    News
    CBC

    Plaque initiative connects Westmount residents with neighbourhood history

    Tracey Course was certain that she wanted to live in Westmount's architectural heritage area. An Englishwoman who had been residing in a newer part of Edmonton since she moved to Canada in 2005, she missed the charms of home. As the 100th anniversary of the neighbourhood approached, the Westmount Heritage Committee looked for ways to mark its centennial.

  • BASF and Nornickel join forces in European EV battery push
    News
    Reuters

    BASF and Nornickel join forces in European EV battery push

    Underpinned by a new BASF cathode plant in Finland, the agreement could provide fresh impetus to European efforts to create battery cell manufacturing capacity in a market dominated Chinese and Korean producers. Chemicals giant BASF will build a plant to produce cathode materials for batteries in Harjavalta, Finland, adjacent to a nickel and cobalt refinery owned by Nornickel, the world's second-largest nickel miner and a major cobalt producer. "With the investment in Harjavalta, BASF will be present in all major regions with local production and increased customer proximity, further supporting the rapidly growing electric vehicle market," Kenneth Lane, president of BASF's Catalysts division, said on Monday.