Daniel Radcliffe reveals he was offered money from stranger who mistook him for a homeless person

Daniel Radcliffe attends the "Guns Akimbo" premiere during the 2019 Toronto International Film Festival at Ryerson Theatre on September 09, 2019 in Toronto, Canada. (Photo by Phillip Faraone/WireImage)

Daniel Radcliffe has shared that he was once given money by a stranger on the street who assumed he was a homeless person.

The Harry Potter actor, who was named the 8th richest person aged 30 or under in Britain last year, told the tale in an appearance on The Graham Norton Show which aired on Friday night.

He said: "I was on the street with this dog and my girlfriend was in the shop. It was very cold, I've got my hoodie and my fleece and then a big coat over that and the dog was really cold so I was like 'I'll kneel by you and stroke you and try and keep you warm'."

Read more: Daniel Radcliffe on why he wouldn’t play Wolverine

“I saw this guy look at me and smile. Then he walked past me, got about five steps away, reappeared with a five dollar bill over my shoulder and went, ‘Get yourself a coffee mate.’”

“Apparently I have to shave more often,” Radcliffe, 30, added.

Daniel Radcliffe during the filming for the Graham Norton Show at BBC Studioworks 6 Television Centre, Wood Lane, London, to be aired on BBC One on Friday evening. (Photo by Isabel Infantes/PA Images via Getty Images)

Radcliffe was on the programme alongside guest Sharon Horgan, Alan Cummings and Mariam Margolyes.

Margolyes, who starred as Professor Sprout in the Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets, has become an established favourite on the show due to her candidness.

Earlier in the week, the Call the Midwife actor appeared on This Morning where she called herself a "tw*t" live on air while recalling an experience of meeting the Queen.

“Well, I have talked about this before on television, and I feel awkward saying it again,” the 78-year-old began. “But I was invited to the palace as part of British Book Week and when the Queen came over to me, she asked me what I did... in a very nice way, you know.

Miriam Margolyes and Daniel Radcliffe during the filming for the Graham Norton Show at BBC Studioworks 6 Television Centre, Wood Lane, London, to be aired on BBC One on Friday evening. (Photo by Isabel Infantes/PA Images via Getty Images)

“And I said, like a t**t, I’m the best reader of stories in the whole world.”

Margolyes told of how Her Majesty went on a Scottish man who said he taught dyslexic children to read.

“‘Ma’am, we’ve noticed that if you put the letters in different colours and the pages are printed in different colours, it helps the children absorb the information more quickly,’” she continued, impersonating the teacher.

“And I said, ‘Really?! That’s fascinating, I didn’t know that,’” she added. “And she turned to me and went, ‘Be quiet’. She had every right to do [it], but it was a bit discombobulating.”

  • Grandson of Elvis Presley has died at age 27, agent says
    Celebrity
    The Canadian Press

    Grandson of Elvis Presley has died at age 27, agent says

    LOS ANGELES — The son of Lisa Marie Presley has died. He was 27.Presley’s representative Roger Widynowski said in a statement Sunday to The Associated Press that she was “heartbroken” after learning about the death of her son Benjamin Keough. He is the grandson of the late Elvis Presley.TMZ reports that Keough died from a self-inflicted gunshot wound Sunday in Calabasas, California.“She is completely heartbroken, inconsolable and beyond devastated but trying to stay strong for her 11-year-old twins and her oldest daughter Riley,” Widynowski said in the statement. “She adored that boy. He was the love of her life.”Presley had Keough and actress Riley Keough, 31, with her former husband Danny Keough. She also had twins from another marriage.Nancy Sinatra tweeted her condolences to Presley, writing, “I have known you since before your mama gave birth to you, never dreaming you would have pain like this in your life. I’m so very sorry.”The Associated Press

  • Quebec police say girls who were subject of Amber Alert found dead
    News
    The Canadian Press

    Quebec police say girls who were subject of Amber Alert found dead

    SAINT-APOLLINAIRE, Que. — The bodies of two girls who were the subject of an Amber Alert were found in a suburb of Quebec City on Saturday, in what Premier Francois Legault is describing as a "national tragedy."Quebec provincial police said they found the bodies of Norah and Romy Carpentier, aged 11 and 6, in a wooded area of St-Apollinaire, Que., drawing to a close a days-long search that gripped the province."Like all Quebecers, I am devastated, without words. Losing two children, what we hold most dear in life, is incomprehensible," Legault said on Twitter. "It is a national tragedy."He said that all of Quebec is grieving with Norah and Romy's loved ones.A spokeswoman for the provincial police confirmed the news of the girls' deaths on Saturday afternoon, saying the investigation into the cause of death is ongoing.But Ann Mathieu said the current priority is to locate the girls' father, Martin Carpentier."We think that he is still in the area, so the police operation is still on to find him as soon as possible," she said.The girls had been missing since late Wednesday. Their disappearance has gripped people across the province who had hoped they would be found safe.Police had said the girls and their father were believed to have been in a car crash on Highway 20 in St-Apollinaire on Wednesday evening.Investigators said the car was heading east on the highway when it skidded into the median, flipped over and landed on the shoulder on the opposite side of the highway.An Amber Alert was issued for the girls Thursday afternoon, and an extensive police search began in the rural area south of Quebec City.That search had resumed Saturday morning, with police deploying a helicopter, as well as canine units, ATVs and on-foot search teams, to try to locate the three people.Police believe Carpentier could still be in St-Apollinaire or the nearby town of St-Agapit, Que., Mathieu said."We ask the residents of St-Apollinaire and also St-Agapit to really be alert," she said.Bernard Ouellet, the mayor of St-Apollinaire, said earlier Saturday that the tragedy touched the hearts of people across the province."Everyone has tears in their eyes," Ouellet said in a brief interview. "It's not easy for anyone."Prime Minister Justin Trudeau joined the chorus of condolences, writing on Twitter that he's "devastated" by the news."My heart breaks for the family and friends of Norah and Romy — I'm sending you my deepest condolences," he wrote. "Know that all Canadians are keeping you in their thoughts tonight."Mathieu said police are asking anyone who sees Carpentier or has any information on his whereabouts to immediately contact 911.Police say the 44-year-old was wearing a grey T-shirt and jeans when he was last seen. He is listed as being five-foot-ten and weighing 130 pounds.This report by The Canadian Press was first published July 11, 2020.The Canadian Press

  • Invasion  of the creepy-crawlies: Southern Ontario residents battling plague of caterpillars
    Science
    CBC

    Invasion of the creepy-crawlies: Southern Ontario residents battling plague of caterpillars

    After struggling for years to control the invasive Asian longhorned beetle, the Canadian Food Inspection Agency has announced the tree-killing insect has finally been eradicated in Canada.But as that struggle ends, another one is being waged in several Ontario communities, against a different invasive insect.Hordes of Gypsy Moth caterpillars are being reported in Eastern Ontario, Bancroft, Kitchener-Waterloo, Guelph, Vaughan and Caledon."It becomes noticeable when people are sitting on their back patio and there are insects plopping into their drinks," said Peter Wynnyczuk, a forestry technician and president of P and A Urban Forestry Consulting in Toronto."They're very aggressive when the populations are high ... They'll start to eat anything that's green ... including lawns, with the exception of poison ivy."Caledon is one of the infestation hotspots. At the Credit Valley Conservation Authority there, invasive species expert Bryana McLoughlin said Gypsy Moth go through steep population spurts every decade or so, and the Caledon area happens to be in the midst of one now."We have been getting a lot of calls; people are really concerned especially in this area," she said."The trees are noticeably being eaten and a lot of them have lost their leaves completely ... but generally as long as they're not being completely defoliated for more than two years they can usually pull through."A statement from Caledon's town council warns homeowners that the municipality won't intervene if a caterpillar breakout happens on private property.Several residents there say they've been trying — in vain — to stem the Gypsy Moth caterpillar tide.Wayne McTaggart taped a belt of duct tape, sticky side out, around his trees, on the advice of an arbourist.He's also been spending time trying, unsuccessfully, to clean the sidewalk in front of his Caledon home. It's been stained dark brown with excrement from the caterpillars that are swarming over one of his trees.His neighbour, Sharyn Holloway, has also been trying, just as unsuccessfully, to control the infestation on her property by using a solution commonly suggested by experts: She wrapped a belt of burlap at chest height around her maple tree. In the heat of the afternoon, the caterpillars seek shelter there, allowing her to spray them down with soapy water, which supposedly kills them."They're terrible," she said. "And it's what they drop on the driveway — that's the problem."I've lived here for 14 years, and this is the first time I've had it, so..."McLaughlin suggests hunting for the nests — beige, fuzzy areas about the size of a toonie that appear on the sides of trees and houses — and scraping them off into soapy water.Other than that, she suggests patience may be the best strategy."So at this point there's not a whole lot to do, other than trying to remove the mature caterpillars from your trees," she said. In another month or so, the larvae will pupate into adult Gypsy Moths.At Caledon's town hall, Mayor Allan Thompson wouldn't speak with CBC Toronto about the problem. But regional councillor Johanna Downey said the local infestation was discussed by councillors at their meeting last Tuesday.She said council has asked staff to come up with a strategy to fight the Gypsy Moths, and some suggestions should be presented to council in a couple of weeks.Another Caledon councillor, Lynn Kiernan, appeared to take a stoic approach to the problem."Many, many areas in Ontario are facing some problems with Gypsy Moths this year. Caledon just happens to be one of them," she said."And you know, nature tells us that these are cyclical, and this too shall pass."

  • Three generations of Bollywood's Bachchan family hit by COVID-19
    Celebrity
    Reuters

    Three generations of Bollywood's Bachchan family hit by COVID-19

    Revered Bollywood actor Amitabh Bachchan's daughter-in-law and granddaughter have joined him and his son in testing positive for COVID-19, the family said on Sunday, in one of the highest-profile cases of the pandemic sweeping India. From hospital with his father in Mumbai, Amitabh Bachchan's son Abhishek said his wife and former Miss World Aishwarya Rai Bachchan and their eight-year-old daughter had also been infected by the new coronavirus.

  • 'Dead man walking': Mobster Pat Musitano has been shot and killed. What happens now?
    News
    CBC

    'Dead man walking': Mobster Pat Musitano has been shot and killed. What happens now?

    Pasquale (Pat) Musitano was killed Friday, but Mafia experts say the notorious Hamilton mobster was living on borrowed time long before the fatal shot was fired.Close calls and brushes with death had stalked the scion of the Musitano crime family for years.He survived one shooting that peppered his home with bullet holes in 2017, and another, just over a year before his death, that sent him to hospital with multiple gunshot wounds."He was a dead man walking," said Antonio Nicaso, a Mafia expert who teaches courses on organized crime at Queen's University in Kingston, Ont."In the world of the Mafia, revenge does not lapse. Revenge does not have a statute of limitations."Ultimately, the 52-year-old couldn't escape those who were gunning for him. On Friday, he was shot and killed outside a strip mall in Burlington, Ont., west of Toronto.Halton Region police confirmed Musitano was killed and said another person — who Nicaso said is believed to have been the mobster's close friend and bodyguard — was wounded and remains in hospital in serious condition.Investigators are searching for a male suspect who fled in a newer model grey four-door sedan "similar to an Infiniti G50."The vehicle will have "fresh damage" on the driver's side near the doors, say police, who are asking anyone who spots it to contact them.Musitano's death marks the end of a string of violent attempts on his life, but it also raises questions about what will happen next now that one of the most powerful organized crime families in Hamilton is suddenly without a figurehead."With the playing field in the underworld being wide open, you're going to have a lot of different groups trying to make a power play," said Stephen Metelsky, a criminology professor at Mohawk College in Hamilton and a retired police sergeant.'Those people never forget, never forgive'The story of the Musitanos stretches back to the 1970s, when the family was linked to convictions for bombings and extortion, as well as the hit on mobster Domenic Racco in the 1980s,Pat and his brother Angelo were charged with first-degree murder in 1997 for the contract killing of local Mob boss Johnny "Pops" Papalia and one of his lieutenants, Carmen Barillaro.The Musitanos reached a deal and pleaded to conspiracy to commit murder in the death of Barillaro. In turn, the charges against them in connection with Papalia's death were dropped.Both men were sentenced to 10 years in prison and were released in 2007.Nicaso said he thinks other underworld figures never forgave Musitano for Papalia's death.Mobsters can hold grudges for years, quietly hunting targets and harbouring "festering feelings of revenge" he said. In the world of the Mob, waiting 23 years for vengeance is nothing. "There have been cases where revenge has come after 50 years," Nicaso said. "Those people never forget, never forgive."Metelsky also traced Musitano's killing back to that of Papalia, pointing out the two deaths are "eerily reminiscent" of each other."Both mobsters [were] gunned down on the street in broad daylight," he said.The organized crime specialist said Angelo's death in 2017 meant his brother's days were numbered, and the repeated attempts on Musitano's life were "foreshadowing" his death."The planning and scheming to kill Pat started the day after he survived last year," Metelsky said.Musitano knew his death was coming, according to the professor."There's no retirement plan in the Mob," he said. "There's typically three exit options in the Mafia: You go to jail, you're murdered or you put on a government jersey and become a co-operating witness."Hard to predict what's nextNicaso said he's not sure what the next chapter will bring for organized crime in the area.Mobsters around the world are less visible today and more focused on making money, he said. The two warring factions within the Rizzuto family have reportedly reached a silent agreement to focus on business, not violence, he noted."My instinct is to say [Musitano's death] was a kind of mission to revenge a betrayal that took place in 1997 ... but you never know," Nicaso said. "They may have some other issue and may continue with the violence. It's very difficult to predict."Regardless, the next moment will be one to watch.Musitano's death means the family, or at least its namesake, is "completely decimated," Metelsky said.It's a situation that's left a power vacuum in the underworld and no shortage of groups that might try to fill it."Hamilton is a very ripe geographical area for all kinds of criminal rackets," Metelsky said, with a location nestled close to Toronto and just a short drive from Buffalo and the U.S. border."Will the violence stop? No," he said. "The problem is the violence never stops."

  • Pelosi says Trump 'messing with' children's health on school reopenings
    Politics
    Reuters

    Pelosi says Trump 'messing with' children's health on school reopenings

    House Speaker Nancy Pelosi accused President Donald Trump of "messing with" children's health on Sunday and said federal guidelines on reopening schools amid the coronavirus outbreak should be mandatory. The Democratic House of Representatives leader sharply criticized the Trump administration for advocating a return to school in the fall as coronavirus infections surge across the country, particularly in states that reopened their economies earliest during the pandemic. Critics of the Trump administration's pandemic response have long called for a national strategy on mitigation efforts.

  • News
    The Canadian Press

    Calgary man dies in mountain hiking incident, others injured by rock fall

    CANMORE, Alta. — The RCMP say a Calgary man died of injuries he suffered Saturday afternoon while hiking in Kananaskis Country near Canmore, Alta.Police say the 30-year-old man was on a popular trail on Mount Tamnuska when he fell about six metres.They say that as bystanders came to the injured man's aid, several boulders broke loose from the scree slope above, striking the man as well as some other people.Police say the hiker suffered a head injury and later died despite the life saving efforts of both bystanders and personnel from a number of emergency services.The man's name was being withheld pending notification of next of kin, and there was no immediate word on the condition of the others hit by the falling rocks.The RCMP also say that in two other separate incidents Saturday in the same area, a 24-year-old man suffered a head injury in a fall on the scree slope, while another hiker sustained a fracture in a fall.This report by The Canadian Press was first published July 12, 2020.The Canadian Press

  • Trudeau's past ethics transgressions hurt the Liberals. Will it happen again?
    News
    CBC

    Trudeau's past ethics transgressions hurt the Liberals. Will it happen again?

    The controversy over the federal government's decision to grant a $912 million contract to a charity with links to the prime minister's family opens Prime Minister Justin Trudeau up to the conclusion that he violated federal ethics rules a third time.What impact could it have on public opinion?Twice already, Canada's conflict of interest and ethics commissioner, has found the prime minister violated ethics rules. The first occasion was in 2017, when former commissioner Mary Dawson ruled on Trudeau and his family accepting a vacation on the Aga Khan's private island in the Bahamas.The second occasion was just last year, when the current commissioner, Mario Dion, found that Trudeau had tried to influence then-justice minister Jody Wilson-Raybould to overrule a decision not to grant a deferred prosecution agreement to SNC-Lavalin.Dion already had announced he would be looking into the decision to grant the WE Charity a sole-sourced contract to administer the Canada Student Service Grant when the charity revealed it and its affiliates had paid the prime minister's mother and brother about $300,000 for speaking engagements over the last four years.It takes time for the commissioner to complete an investigation. His office tweeted Friday that it usually takes about seven months. But if this scandal does any political damage to the prime minister and his party, it's likely to inflict it now — and not when the commissioner finally releases a report.That's what happened the last two times, at least.The vacation on the Aga Khan's island in 2017 effectively ended Trudeau's post-election honeymoon. His party had racked up huge leads in the polls after its 2015 victory, surging to between 45 and 50 per cent support. According to the CBC's Poll Tracker, the Liberals had about 43.2 per cent support before the story about the vacation was first reported.There was an immediate impact on Liberal support, with the party falling to 37.3 per cent over the subsequent six weeks. Those 5.9 percentage points were never entirely recovered — to this day, the Liberals have never hit 43.2 per cent in the Poll Tracker again.But with a solid majority government, the Liberals had time on their side. By the beginning of February 2019, the party was still polling at 37.5 per cent support and in a decent position heading into an election year.The SNC-Lavalin affair was a bombshell. Support for the Liberals plummeted, hitting a low of 29.6 per cent by the beginning of May. That loss of 7.9 points was not recovered in time for the October election, which saw the Liberals take 33.1 per cent of the vote.Rebounds can take months — if they happenBoth of these ethics violations contributed to a segment of the Liberal Party's support base peeling off — some of it temporarily, some of it for good.It was easier for the Liberals to bounce back from the public opinion hit caused by the Bahamas trip. After just over four months, the Liberals were back up to 42.3 per cent support in the Poll Tracker — a recovery of all but 0.9 percentage points of the initial 5.9-point loss. The Liberals were able to retain their lead over the Conservatives for another year — until the prime minister's trip to India.Making up the party's SNC-Lavalin loss was more difficult. After the story initially broke, the Liberals' polling peak came only eight months later, when the party hit 34.3 per cent support with just two weeks to go before voting day in October. By then, the Liberals had recovered just 3.2 points of their 7.9-point loss.It took a global pandemic to push the Liberals above their pre-SNC-Lavalin level of support.What kind of controversy will this turn out to be?It wasn't until the beginning of April 2020 — over a year after the Globe and Mail broke the SNC-Lavalin story — that the Liberals surged past the 37.5 per cent support they had at the beginning of 2019.The latest polling estimate gives the Liberals 40.4 per cent support and a 12.5-point lead over the Conservatives. With those kinds of numbers (drawn from polls conducted before the latest ethics controversy), the Liberals would be nearly assured of winning the majority government they failed to secure last year.The question is what kind of impact this week's news will have on Liberal support — an especially delicate question in a minority Parliament.If the Liberals experience the same six-to-eight point slide, by the late summer or fall the party would find itself roughly back where it was last election night. All of the political capital the Liberals have gained over their handling of the COVID-19 outbreak would be gone. The odds of the Liberals calling an election on their own would be slim to none, and it would be up to the opposition parties to decide whether to take advantage of it by forcing another election themselves.Not all controversies have the same impacts, however.When photos were published in the midst of the last campaign showing that Trudeau had worn blackface on multiple occasions before entering politics, there was enormous potential for a career-ending blow to the prime minister.Instead, the Liberals saw their support hold steady. The party was polling at 34.2 per cent when the story broke. It only dropped by less than a percentage point a week later — a loss the party made good two weeks after that.The dynamics of the election campaign played an important role in the resilience of Liberal Party support, but polls and the party's own research suggested that Canadians didn't believe Trudeau was racist and felt he had made a sincere apology.It's too early to plot the political ramifications of Trudeau's WE controversy. Canadians might not be paying attention to the same degree as they would if it weren't summer — or if there wasn't a global pandemic to worry about. Nevertheless, the Bloc Québécois is calling for the prime minister to step aside and the Conservatives want the police to investigate.But in the court of public opinion, the decisive factor might prove to be whether — after blackface and two prior ethics violations — Canadians are still willing to give Trudeau the benefit of the doubt.

  • Is this 'surreal nightmare' an unpublished photo of the Halifax Explosion?
    News
    CBC

    Is this 'surreal nightmare' an unpublished photo of the Halifax Explosion?

    "The photo has the look of a very troubling dream," Dan Conlin says as he studies an old black-and-white image.Conlin is a transportation historian who's spent a lifetime studying images of ships, trains and aircraft. He's also a former curator of Halifax's Maritime Museum of the Atlantic, which houses a large collection of materials from the 1917 Halifax Explosion.The image he's studying surfaced recently on Reddit with a user from Halifax, England, wondering if it was a "new" image of the 1917 disaster."You have these tranquil little wavelets in the foreground and some stately, anchored vessels — including a sailing ship," Conlin said. "But in the background there are these awful, nightmarish clouds, including a horrible column that is rising into the sky. It looks like a surreal nightmare."When Conlin first looked at it, the crisp details of the foreground and the blurry background raised his skeptical eyebrows. "There was quite a tradition in the World War I era of faking photos by doing composite photos, where you layer one image on top of another," he said.One well-known photo of the explosion taken from McNabs Island was later suspected to have been doctored by a company. They seem to have added clouds for dramatic effect — and to sell more postcards.But Conlin thinks in the nightmarish photo, it's more likely that the clouds are moving from the force of the explosion, while the ships were untroubled by any winds. The disaster killed nearly 2,000 people and badly hurt thousands more. It levelled the Richmond district in the north end."It's carnage and destruction out of Dante at the base of that cloud. People are dying and fires are starting and this awful event has hit Halifax in the distance," he said."That angry cloud gives you an idea of the violence and tragedy that is unfolding even as the shutter clicks. It's really rare and that photo, as far as I can tell, has never been published."Searching for 'RGS'CBC News tracked down the source of the social media image to the Community Archives of Belleville and Hastings County in Ontario, where archivist Amanda Hill answered the phone.She said the photo, which measures seven centimetres by 10 centimetres, entered their collection in 2012 as part of a donation of a personal album of photos taken between 1917 and 1919."It looks like it's been through the wars. The image is a bit battered and the image is kind of difficult to see," she said.When Hill saw the coverage of the 100th anniversary of the explosion in 2017, she dug up the album and looked again at the smoke-cloud photo."On the back are written the words, 'Halifax 30 seconds after the explosion. RGS,'" she said.Hill studied the album and realized some of the photos showed a sailor named Reginald Stevens. She did some more research and learned that his middle name was Garnet. She'd found the RGS who took the photo. "I have to admire his presence of mind," she said.That was good evidence she was looking at an original photo, not a mass-printed image, and thus it might be new. She scanned it and posted it to their website.But she couldn't find service records showing RGS had been in Halifax on Dec. 6, 1917, and in place to have taken the photo. "It would be interesting to look those up and see which ship he was on. That would place him in Halifax at the time of the explosion."CBC sent the photo to Joel Zemel, who's written two books about the Halifax Explosion. He's studied hundreds of photos relating to the explosion and estimates fewer than 20 show the actual blast cloud. He's posted many of the known ones to his website."I haven't seen this one," he said.He noted the clouds obscure the distance and it gives few clues as to where it was taken. The strange three-masted sailboat to the right seems out of place in the steam age, but could have been moored and hulked — that is, used as a floating warehouse.The high angle limits where the photographer could be around the harbour. "One of the only vantage points that could take a photograph that high would be off HMCS Niobe, which was a depot ship in the harbour at the time."The Niobe was anchored near what was then the Canadian naval college and today is CFB Stadacona. The explosion happened about 1.2 kilometres away, near today's Irving Shipyard.Zemel scoured his personal archives and drew a frustrating blank. He returned to the search the next day and double-checked the Canadian Navy List of personnel. Reginald G. Stevens was a mate in the Royal Canadian Volunteer Reserve."I had missed the key entry in my previous search. According to the Canadian Navy List, December 1917, Mate Stevens was indeed borne to HMCS Niobe," he said."Here we have a sailor who was in the right position at the right time to have taken this photograph. That gives it some credibility."But Zemel said the time frame doesn't match eyewitness accounts from the Niobe."The water is very calm. That seems kind of strange, because within 30 seconds of the explosion, there would have been the tidal wave which came up on the Niobe."One eyewitness from the Niobe reported that the blast had blown his jacket off and tossed the 11,000-tonne ship into the air, before she crashed back down. As soon as the boat stopped bouncing, they sprang into action to help those caught in the inferno.Zemel concludes it's plausible that Stevens took the image from the Niobe, but not thirty seconds after the explosion. Perhaps it was a few minutes later, and when he finally printed the photo and wrote on it, he estimated it had only been thirty seconds.Mysterious sailing shipZemel has tried extensively to identify the sailing ship in the photo. If he could name it, that could be the critical confirmation that the photo is what it claims to be. It would also confirm from where Stevens took the photo.He scoured insurance records and lists of ships damaged by the explosion, but nothing matches it.Zemel said the unidentified ship is driving him nuts. "I think the photograph is authentic. It's just this boat is an enigma."Dan Conlin adds that while we have good lists of ships damaged by the explosion, we don't have lists of ships in the harbour that were not damaged by the explosion. So the mystery sailboat could have emerged unscathed and sailed on, dropping off the historical horizon.Amanda Hill, the archivist, praised Stevens's presence of mind to take the photo and wondered why he would have had a camera handy 103 years ago.Conlin says in that regard, 1917 was a lot like 2020. People had been taking photos since the 1830s, but it was a cumbersome, expensive process. Only professional photographers took photos.But Kodak had started selling its iconic Brownie cameras to the masses just before the war."People had the same urge that we have nowadays to snap photos of friends and relatives. They were using this new technology to take pictures of family and neighbours and houses and their first car and buddies in the military," Conlin said."Sailors love to show families what they've seen when they go back home."Conlin noted that the Niobe was an anchored ship at the time and served as a floating barracks. "There were all kinds of people who were assigned to Niobe, but would work in other parts of the dockyard or the harbour," he said.That means even if we can show the RGS who took the photo was the Reginald Garnet Stevens stationed to the Niobe, and that the Niobe was in the harbour at the time of the explosion, and that the angle of the photo matches the angle from the Niobe, the exact location of the photo escapes us.Stevens could have taken it from the Bedford Basin looking south to the Narrows, or near Georges Island, looking north to the disaster.Identifying that sailing ship, or finding a diary entry from Stevens saying he took the photo on the day of the disaster, would likely be enough to confirm it 100 per cent."The explosion happened over a hundred years ago, but it still has surprises for us," Conlin said. "This picture is a real reminder of that."MORE TOP STORIES

  • 'The most American thing ever': Video of Calgary man rescuing baby bald eagle from lake goes viral
    News
    CBC

    'The most American thing ever': Video of Calgary man rescuing baby bald eagle from lake goes viral

    Calgary resident Brett Bacon, along with partner Lindsay and his newborn child, were speeding down Lake Windermere in British Columbia on July 4 when they spotted something odd in the water.As the boat drew closer, Bacon realized there was a large bird floating in the water with its wings spread — a young bald eagle."As we got closer, he tried to fly away and he just couldn't get out of the water at all," Bacon said. "So at that point, I just realized that he was in a bit of trouble."Lindsay started recording, and caught what happened next on video.WATCH | Brett Bacon rescues young bald eagle from Lake Windermere on July 4:Bacon brought the boat close to the eagle and, after a failed attempt, succeeded in pulling it out of the water."I got him into the boat, and that time I held onto him," Bacon said. "He fully held onto me and sunk his talons through my jacket sleeves and into my arms. So that was really enjoyable to feel that."Bacon and Lindsay cruised about a kilometre back to shore. There, they let the eagle free. "He just kinda stood there shivering and hopefully warming up a bit," Bacon said. Video goes viralSoon, video of the rescue was picked up by a popular Instagram account, and soon was followed by outlets like TMZ,  The New York Post and Fox News, with some comments referring to the July 4 episode as "the most American thing ever.""I woke up on my birthday and the whole thing was going crazy," Bacon said. "My mom said it best — the reason it blew up, was because it had nothing to do with the world, nothing to do with COVID-19 … it's just a guy saving an animal, and glad to be part of it."Bacon said he soon heard from wildlife officials about what would come next for the young eagle."He did get picked up by wildlife officials, they're going to be bringing him back, taking him somewhere outside Windermere and setting him free again," Bacon said.

  • Over 600,000 Hong Kongers cast 'protest' vote against new security laws
    News
    Reuters

    Over 600,000 Hong Kongers cast 'protest' vote against new security laws

    Hong Kong's opposition camp said on Sunday that over 600,000 citizens in the Chinese-ruled city cast ballots over the weekend in primaries it cast as a symbolic protest vote against tough national security laws imposed by Beijing. The unofficial poll will decide the strongest pro-democracy candidates to contest elections in September to Hong Kong's Legislative Council. Then, they aim to seize majority control for the first time from pro-Beijing rivals by riding a wave of anti-China sentiment stirred by the law, which critics say has gravely undermined Hong Kong's freedoms.

  • News
    CBC

    Oakville man charged following alleged 'hate motivated' assault

    A 34-year-old man from Oakville has been charged in connection with an alleged "hate motivated" assault on Saturday afternoon, Halton police say. According to a release issued Saturday, police were called to a parking lot in the area of Cornwall and Trafalgar roads around 2:30 p.m. for a disturbance.The accused was allegedly crouching down near the victim's vehicle when the victim, a person of colour, asked what he was doing. That's when the accused apparently yelled several racial slurs at the victim and assaulted him, according to reports told to officers by the victim and numerous witnesses at the scene. Upon arriving, the accused "actively resisted" an officer prior to being arrested, police say.The victim sustained minor injuries as a result of the incident. The arresting officer was uninjured.The accused has been charged with assault, and assault with intent to resist arrest and cause disturbance. He was released from custody and is scheduled to appear in court at a later date.

  • As permafrost thaws under intense heat, Russia's Siberia burns — again
    News
    CBC

    As permafrost thaws under intense heat, Russia's Siberia burns — again

    Right around now, University of British Columbia climatologist and tundra researcher Greg Henry would usually be up at Alexandra Fiord on the central-east coast of Canada's Ellesmere Island experiencing the Arctic's warming climate up close. Instead, the pandemic has kept his research team grounded in Vancouver — and his focus has shifted to observing the dramatic events unfolding across the Arctic ocean in northern Siberia."It's remarkable — it's scary," said Henry of the incredible run of high temperatures in Russia's far north that have been breaking records for the past month.This week, a European Union climate monitoring project reported temperatures in June were up to 10 degrees higher than usual in some parts of Russia's Arctic, with an overall rise of five degrees.The heat and dry tundra conditions have also triggered vast forest fires. Currently, 1.77 million hectares of land are burning with expectations that the total fire area could eventually surpass the 17 million hectares that burned in 2019.Equally striking is where the fires are burning."Now we are seeing these fires within 15 kilometres of the Arctic Ocean," said Henry. "Usually there's not much fuel to burn there, because it's kept cold by the ocean so you don't get ignition of fires that far north."WATCH | Siberian heat wave, forest fires could have global consequences:This year though, he said the heat has dried the ground out enough to change the dynamics."It's a harbinger of what we are in for because the Arctic has been warming at twice the rate of the rest of the planet."Environmental disasterThe huge bubble of warm air that parked over Siberia has remained remarkably stationary over northern Russia,  meaning Canada's Arctic has largely been spared the soaring temperatures."Alert, the furthest north weather station, went up to 14 or 15 degrees in mid-June when it should have been zero or two. So that may be a bit of that heat tendril dipping down," said Henry.But in Russia, the heat wave is altering the landscape with severe implications.In late May, extreme heat may have thawed the permafrost at an industrial site near the Arctic city of Norilsk causing what some critics are calling one of Russia's worst ever environmental disasters.More than 20 million tones of diesel fuel escaped from a containment area and turned the water in a nearby river a deep shade of red, prompting President Vladimir Putin to declare a state of emergency.Putin has fined the company and chastised local officials for letting the spill happen, but the damage to the polluted area may last for decades.Fire damageIt's Russia's vast forests, however, that appear to be bearing the brunt of the damage."The frequencies and intensities of fires in Siberia have increased much due to climate change," said Anton Beneslavskiy, the wildfire coordinator with Greenpeace Russia in Moscow."On this scale, the fires are unmanageable."Greenpeace has long argued that the Kremlin's rules and policies on fighting forest fires have made the challenges brought on by hotter, dryer weather worse.Russia has the largest forested area in the world, much of it sparsely settled.    Beneslavskiy said a 2006 change to Russia's fire management law gave local authorities the legal right to ignore fires if there is low risk to local populations and when suppressing them makes little economic sense.He said the result is that smaller fires which are initially possible to manage grow quickly to become extreme events. 'Annual catastrophe'"This lack of will to solve the problem brings us to catastrophe every year," said Beneslavskiy."It's a vicious cycle. More fires produce more climate change and more climate change fuels more fire." Editorials in local Siberian newspapers routinely call on the Putin government to put more money into the fight against forest fires.  After last summer's disaster, Prime Minister Dmitry Medvedev promised to reconsider the firefighting policy.Since then, however, Greenpeace and other local environmental groups claim there's little evidence anything has changed.Kremlin-appointed officials insist they are throwing everything they have at containing the worst of the wildfires, with more than 1,300 firefighters and 130 pieces of equipment deployed in the Krasnoyarsk region of southern Siberia alone, according to the TASS news service.Another report Friday on state owned NTV said local authorities plan to deploy 120 paratroop fire fighters from the air to help build fire breaks.Russia's economy is heavily dependent on resources from its Arctic region — especially oil and gas — and it's the fourth largest emitter of greenhouse gases in the world, after the U.S., India and China.But while Russia has ratified the Paris Climate accord, it is not required to cut emissions as they are still lower than 1990 levels, when the Soviet economy was heavily industrialized. Economic lossesThe Moscow Times reports economic losses from thawing permafrost alone is expected to cost Russia's economy up to $2.3 billion US per year. Last year's fires likely cost rural communities in the region almost $250 million US.In March, Russia announced 29 measures it would be taking to try to deal with climate change over its vast landmass but critics complained the efforts have been more focused on exploiting natural resources in the Arctic than mitigating the impacts of a warming climate."They are actively going after every mineral and oil and gas deposit that they can," said UBC's Greg Henry. "We haven't taken that (approach) into our Arctic."But Siberia's heat and fires — as bad as they are — don't come as much of a surprise to veteran Arctic climate watchers."I've been going up since 1980, and it scares me now to see how much things have changed," said Henry.   "That is the new normal, the rapid change."

  • News
    CBC

    Man wanted in Edmonton 'suspicious death' found dead in British Columbia

    A 39-year-old suspect in an Edmonton woman's death was found dead in British Columbia late Saturday.Early Saturday, officers found a deceased woman in a suite in a condo building at Mullen Road and Mullen Place in south Edmonton. Deeming the death suspicious, Edmonton police put out a call for public tips on the whereabouts of a 2019 white Toyota Tacoma. Investigators said the truck may be connected to the woman's death, and warned anyone who spotted it not to approach the vehicle or driver.Late Saturday, RCMP in Sicamous, B.C., located the truck, and found the male suspect, deceased, a short distance away from the vehicle. In a news release Sunday, Edmonton police said B.C. authorities will conduct an autopsy on the man. Edmonton police will maintain control of the investigation into the woman's death. That autopsy is scheduled for Tuesday. Edmonton police say they will work closely with Sicamous investigators, but said homicide detectives are not looking for any additional suspects.

  • What you need to know about COVID-19 in Ottawa on Sunday, July 12
    Health
    CBC

    What you need to know about COVID-19 in Ottawa on Sunday, July 12

    Recent developments * City of Ottawa data shows that when it comes to businesses that have violated COVID-19 rules, barbershops and hair salons have received the bulk of tickets.What's the latest?The recent heat wave is increasing calls to do something about long-term care homes that don't have air conditioning — particularly ones where residents are confined to their rooms due to COVID-19 outbreaks.Newly released data from the City of Ottawa shows nine hair stylists and barbers received fines for opening during the COVID-19 shutdown.Four restaurants, two landscaping companies and one garden centre were also fined the standard $880, while two people also received another $1,130 fine for obstruction of implementing those orders.At least 70 people turned out to be tested for COVID-19 at a pop-up clinic east of the city's downtown Saturday.The clinic was arranged by ACORN Ottawa, a group that advocates for low-income residents. The goal was to make it easier for them to get tested for the virus by not having to travel long distances to one of the more permanent assessment centres.How many cases are there?There have been 2,149 confirmed cases of COVID-19 in Ottawa and 263 deaths as of Sunday. The vast majority of cases in the city, 1,836, are classified as resolved. Gatineau has reported 535 total cases.Public health officials have reported more than 3,400 cases across eastern Ontario and western Quebec, of which nearly 3,000 are resolved.Kingston now has 17 active cases of COVID-19. Most are linked to three nail salons: Binh's Nails and Spa, where the recent outbreak started, Kingdom Nails and Georgia Nail Salon. The Amherstview Golf Club has also seen new cases. Clients at all four businesses are being asked to self-isolate and get tested for COVID-19.COVID-19 has killed 102 people outside Ottawa: 52 in Leeds, Grenville and Lanark counties, 17 in other parts of eastern Ontario and 33 in the Outaouais.What's open and closed?Eastern Ontario is in "Stage 2" of the province's recovery plan, allowing more activities and "circles" of up to 10 people that don't have to distance.Some streets in Ottawa's ByWard Market have now turned into patio space, including parts of Clarence Street, William Street and a section of the north side of York Street.WATCH| How threatening is COVID-19 if it's airborne?A 17-block stretch of Bank Street will also close to vehicles on Saturdays from 9 a.m. until just before midnight. That will last until at least early August.Ottawa's pools started to reopen July 6, as did five city rinks. Drivers are also once again subject to tickets if they violate posted time limits at on-street parking spaces.The Ottawa Art Gallery and the Diefenbunker Museum reopened with restrictions last week. The National Gallery of Canada reopens Thursdays to Sundays starting July 18.Quebec now allows indoor, distanced gatherings of up to 50 people, including in places of worship and indoor sports venues, and has relaxed rules at daycares.The province has also allowed bars, spas, water parks and casinos to reopen.Quebec's back-to-school plans bring older students to classrooms again. Ontario has put three options for next school year on the table, while post-secondary schools are moving toward more online classes in September.Distancing and isolatingThe coronavirus primarily spreads through droplets when an infected person coughs or sneezes. People don't need to have symptoms to be contagious.That means physical distancing measures such as working from home and in Ontario, staying at least two metres away from anyone they don't live with or have in their circle.The City of Ottawa has made cloth face masks mandatory in indoor public settings. Anyone who has symptoms or travelled recently outside Canada must self-isolate for at least 14 days.Specifically in Ottawa, anyone waiting for a COVID-19 test result must self-isolate at least until they know the result.The same goes for anyone in Ontario who's been in contact with someone who's tested positive or is presumed to have COVID-19.Ontario's Chief Medical Officer of Health strongly urges self-isolation for individuals who have weakened immune systems and Ottawa Public Health recommends people over 70 stay home as much as possible. What are the symptoms of COVID-19?COVID-19 can range from a cold-like illness to a severe lung infection, with common symptoms including fever, a dry cough, vomiting and the loss of taste or smell. Less common symptoms include chills, headaches and pinkeye. The Ontario government says in rare cases, children can develop a rash.If you have severe symptoms, call 911.Where to get testedIn eastern Ontario:In Ottawa any resident who feels they need a test, even if they are not showing symptoms, can now be tested at one of three sites.Inuit in Ottawa can call the Akausivik Inuit Family Health Team at 613-740-0999 for service, including testing, in Inuktitut or English on weekdays.Testing has also expanded for local residents and employees who work in the Eastern Ontario Health Unit area.There is a drive-thru test centre in Casselman and assessment centres in Hawkesbury and Winchester that don't require people to call ahead.Others in Rockland and Cornwall require an appointment.WATCH | Mothers disproportionately affected by the pandemic, research suggestsA COVID-19 assessment centre has opened in Alexandria, running Tuesdays and Thursdays by appointment only.In Kingston, the Leon's Centre is now open from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. every day, replacing the previous location at the Kingston Memorial Centre. Find it at Gate 2.Napanee's test centre is open daily for people who call for an appointment.The Leeds, Grenville and Lanark unit asks you to get tested if you have a symptom or concerns about exposure.It has a walk-in site in Brockville open seven days a week at the Memorial Centre and testing sites in Smiths Falls and Almonte which require an appointment.The public health unit in the Belleville area is asking people to call it, their family doctor or Telehealth if they have symptoms or questions.You can arrange a test in Bancroft, Belleville or Trenton by calling the centre, or in Picton by texting or calling 613-813-6864.Renfrew County is also providing pop-up and home testing under some circumstances. Residents without access to a family doctor can call 1-844-727-6404 to register for a test or if they have health questions, COVID-19-related or not.If you're concerned about the coronavirus, take the self-assessment.In western Quebec:Outaouais residents should call 1-877-644-4545 if they have symptoms for further assistance.First Nations:Local communities have declared states of emergency, put in a curfew or both.Akwesasne has opened a mobile COVID-19 test site available by appointment only. Anyone returning to Akwesasne who's been farther than 80 kilometres away is asked to self-isolate for 14 days.Anyone in Tyendinaga who's interested in a test can call 613-967-3603 to talk to a nurse. The community's reopening plan that's now underway.Kitigan Zibi is planning for an Aug. 29 election with changes depending on the status of the pandemic at that time.For more information

  • Strapped for cash? How to uncover unclaimed money that may belong to you
    Business
    CBC

    Strapped for cash? How to uncover unclaimed money that may belong to you

    Strapped for cash during the COVID-19 pandemic due to the economic slowdown? You might have unclaimed money from your past that could help pay the bills — perhaps from a dormant bank account or a lost cheque.Or maybe a rich relative died without a will and — unbeknownst to you — you're entitled to their money. A $1.9 million inheritance is currently sitting idle in B.C., waiting for the next of kin to claim. To find out if you're a millionaire or if you have any other unclaimed funds, here are some free, simple ways to launch your treasure hunt. Uncashed CRA chequesThe Canada Revenue Agency is sitting on about $1 billion from cheques for tax refunds and benefits that taxpayers never cashed. In some cases, the recipient may have lost the cheque or neglected to tell the CRA that they had moved, so it was mailed to the wrong address. In February, the CRA added a new online feature to help unite taxpayers with their uncashed cheques — which never expire. After logging onto your CRA account online, click on the "uncashed cheques" link. That will prompt a list of any CRA cheques in your name that have remained uncashed for at least six months. To claim your money, fill out a form provided online and send it to the agency. The CRA reports that between Feb. 10 — when it launched the new feature — and the end of May, Canadians redeemed more than 260,000 uncashed cheques totalling $63.7 million.Dave Hurley of Vancouver clicked on the "uncashed cheques" link in April and was surprised to discover he had a $88.50 cheque for a 2007 GST/HST credit.He said he made a claim and the CRA deposited the money into his account about a month later."An extra 88 bucks was good — it was great to have," said Hurley, who used the money to splurge on a high-end bottle of Scotch whisky."I felt I deserved it."Central bank has $888 million in unclaimed fundsThe Bank of Canada can also help you locate forgotten cash. When federally regulated banks have unclaimed customer funds — such as bank deposits, GICs and money orders — they wind up at the Bank of Canada after a 10-year period. The bank calls the forgotten money "unclaimed balances," and you can search its online database to find out if any of it belongs to you. To stake a claim, you must fill out a claim form provided online and mail it to the bank with proof of ownership. The Bank of Canada said it paid out $8.5 million last year to Canadians who submitted claims. And it has plenty more to dole out. The bank reports it was sitting on $888 million in unclaimed balances at the close of 2019. Its single-largest holding totals more than $800,000. Rightful owners have ample time to claim their cash. The bank will hold unclaimed balances of less than $1,000 for 30 years and amounts of $1,000 or more for 100 years.Forgotten EI chequesEmployment and Social Development Canada (ESDC), which oversees federal social programs, may also have cash for you. The government department reports that as of Sept. 30, 2019, it was sitting on $133 million from more than 300,000 cheques issued to Canadians that — for some reason — were never cashed. The majority of the cheques belong to people who have at some point collected Canada Pension Plan, Employment Insurance or Old Age Security payments. ESDC doesn't have an online search tool, but you can call Service Canada if you believe you have a forgotten cheque. If it turns out you do and you're able to validate your identity, the department will reissue the cheque.Unclaimed property programsIf you have ever lived in B.C., Alberta or Quebec, you can dig for forgotten money by searching online databases provided by unclaimed property programs in each of the three provinces. The programs collect funds from provincially regulated companies, organizations and financial institutions. Depending on the province, collected funds could include wages, insurance and pension fund payments, as well as accounts from credit unions.All three programs collect unclaimed inheritances left by people who died and no rightful heir can be found. WATCH | Personal finance experts offer advice to Canadians:B.C., Alberta and Quebec's unclaimed property programs each have slightly different rules but share the same goal: to unite people with their long-lost money. "You can't believe what people forget [about] and for what dollars," said Alena Levitz, executive director of the BC Unclaimed Property Society (BCUPS).The BCUPS reports it returned $2,744,595 in unclaimed cash last year to verified owners. It currently has more than $164 million in its coffers waiting to be claimed. The total includes that $1.9 million left by someone who died in B.C. without a will."Somebody was a good saver all their life and just didn't have [close] family and unfortunately, probably didn't think to do a will," Levitz said. She couldn't divulge more details about the case for privacy reasons. BCUPS imposes no time limit to make a claim and has cash still waiting for its rightful owners dating back to the 1800s. Levitz encourages other provinces to establish an unclaimed property program. Currently, residents of provinces without one must make inquiries to individual businesses and organizations to seek out forgotten cash."It should be easy for folks to find money that belongs to them," she said. New Brunswick has an unclaimed property program in the works.

  • Rescued pig smiles with delight when he is given his first watermelon
    News
    Rumble

    Rescued pig smiles with delight when he is given his first watermelon

    Hilton is a lovable soul with a face that seems to smile.

  • Sask. man becomes BBQ king of Bulgaria
    Lifestyle
    CBC

    Sask. man becomes BBQ king of Bulgaria

    When an opportunity to live in Bulgaria came up, Christopher Shannon leapt at the chance.He didn't speak Bulgarian, or have a job, but in a decade he has managed to become somewhat famous in the Balkan nation for selling high end barbecues, smokers and grills.Shannon was born and raised in Regina, and lived in the Queen City until 2009.They moved when his wife, Nadya Mihaylova, wanted to be closer to her aging parents.Shannon said previous trips to the country had made him rethink about his life in Saskatchewan."I had a good job, it paid well, but I was working really long hours, and I was pretty sure I was looking at a heart attack, eventually, "he said. Shannon doesn't recommend moving to a foreign country without a job or a plan of how to get one."it can be a bit of an abyss. No language, no job, and no plan of what I was going to do," he said.'I realized there's money here'The idea to start a new business was sparked by a simple trip to buy a barbecue. The barbecues you could buy in Bulgaria 10 years ago were, in Shannon's words, "complete crap."He decided to import a good barbecue for himself from Europe. Then he thought others there would want the same.  "People thought I was crazy," said Shannon. "Family members were taking bets on how quickly I'd go bankrupt."Instead, he decided to spend a little time at an intersection close to his house. He said he counted the number of cars driving by that he couldn't afford."In a few minutes I saw a Lamborghini, a Ferrari and lots of Mercedes. I realized there's money here," he said.Shannon went against the naysayers and started Great Western Barbecue in Sofia, the capital of Bulgaria. He's selling high end grills that he imports from North American and Europe. Weber, Broil King and Napoleon grills are just a few of the brand names he sells.  He said it was very slow at first and admitted he did nearly everything he could think of to get the business going.He would barbecue on the street in front of his shop and hand out free samples. He'd hand out thousands of flyers and host barbecue events."I'd put on my Cowboy hat and start cooking, and people loved it."One of his earlier sales techniques got him in trouble with the police.  "It's illegal to sell anything on the side of the road in Bulgaria," he said.  "So I used to pretend my van was broken down. I'd park on the side of the road, jack it up and of course I'd have to take a couple of barbecues out of the back of my vehicle, and set them up along the highway."  He said the tactic managed to spark a lot of interest and sell a few barbecues, "until the police caught on to what I was doing."As the desire for high-end barbecues has grown, so has Shannon's popularity. He makes regular appearances on Bulgarian TV as the barbecue king, teaching people how to grill.He also said that the growing love of barbecue among the population is driving people to buy better cuts of meat and try different recipes on the grill.A famous familyWhile Shannon has gained notoriety in the past decade, he's still probably not as famous as his wife, Nadya Mihaylova.Mihaylova was a top-level athlete in rhythmic gymnastics in the 1980s under the name Nadia Kaloyanova. She was a national champion and competed around the world. In those years, Bulgaria was a powerhouse when it came to gymnastics.Mihaylova was a top contender for an Olympic gold medal, but fate and politics intervened. She was slated to compete in the 1984 Olympic games in Los Angeles, but the Soviet-led boycott that year dashed her hopes.A few years later, she moved to Regina to become the head coach of the Wascana Rhythmic Gymnastics Club. That's when she met Shannon.Today, she's still well-known and recognized in Bulgaria. At the peak of her athletic career, the country issued a trading card of Nadia Kaloyanova that was sold in packets of bubble gum. To this day, people still stop her, produce the card and ask for her autograph.These days Shannon is semi-retired and has staff running his store, but still brokers barbecues around the country."It's a pretty good life." he said.

  • Cabin owner warns about 'silent killer' after carbon monoxide close call
    Lifestyle
    CBC

    Cabin owner warns about 'silent killer' after carbon monoxide close call

    When Hilda Senior woke up at her cabin on Saturday morning, she knew something wasn't right. "I remember waking and thinking, why is my heart beating so loud in my ears?"Senior and her husband Albert had arrived at their cabin on an isolated island in Placentia Bay late the night before. They were in a bit of a rush when they arrived, she said, and went to bed around midnight.At 8 a.m. the next day, she felt ill."It felt like someone had doused me with a bucket of water. I couldn't move. At one point I did sit, but I felt like everything went black and I thought I was going to faint, so I lay back on the bed," she said.> He shouted at me to get up but I couldn't get off the bed, I felt like rubber. \- Hilda SeniorSenior weakly called out to her husband, who had gotten up a bit earlier and was outside having a cup of coffee. "He said when he looked at me, he thought [it was a] heart attack, so he shouted at me to get up but I couldn't get off the bed, I felt like rubber," she said."He managed to get me to the kitchen, which was only like 10 feet away from the bed, he put me on a chair and I remember seeing him on the floor … nothing seemed real."Senior said she's not sure how long Albert was on the floor, but he was able to get himself up, get them both outside and call their daughter, who was about 15 minutes away by boat in Red Harbour.It was when he went back into the cabin to get their dog out that he realized what the problem was."He turned off the propane and that's when he figured that it was carbon monoxide. We have a propane fridge and stove in the cabin."'I was pretty close to not coming back'Senior's daughter called 911 to have ambulances meet them in Red Harbour, while a family friend came out to the cabin to bring them back by boat."Luckily, it was a beautiful day on the water — no wind, no waves, so we were able to go faster than normal," she said.Senior said the ambulance took her to the hospital, where doctors treated her for carbon monoxide poisoning."They told me I was pretty close to not coming back. The doctor in Burin told me that I must have had someone looking out for me."Now, a week later, Senior said she still struggles with her breathing at times and has recurring headaches. She said her doctor believes she has some muscle damage in her heart and some "stroke-like symptoms" because of the lack of oxygen.Senior said they usually sleep with a window open and bring a carbon monoxide detector to their cabin, but that night was damp and the window was closed, and they'd forgotten the carbon monoxide detector at home. A problem with the propane fridge caused the build up of carbon monoxide, she said, and they've already gone back to the cabin to get rid of it. The Seniors are now investing in solar panels and an electric refrigerator.And she has a warning for anyone in a similar situation."If you have an older fridge, keep a window open, don't forget your carbon monoxide detector … we've heard of other incidents on the news or whatever, but no, I never thought it would be this serious or that it could be so sneaky," she said."We know now why it's called the silent killer."Read more from CBC Newfoundland and Labrador

  • Saskatoon police pleas for patience in Evan Penner arrest case 'contradictory,' say critics
    News
    CBC

    Saskatoon police pleas for patience in Evan Penner arrest case 'contradictory,' say critics

    Saskatoon police are asking the public not to rush to judgment about the arrest of Evan Penner, but critics say it appears police have already made up their minds.University of Regina associate professor Michelle Stewart, Penner's lawyer Eleanore Sunchild and others say police are being hypocritical. Police have been pleading for patience while publicly releasing selective, biased details about Penner, she said."It does appear to be contradictory to tell people to be patient, and then slowly enter in bits and pieces of information," Stewart said. "People are still looking for a form of accountability in policing that we simply don't have in Saskatchewan."Sunchild said police are "in damage control mode. They're going to release whatever they can to try and assist their case. That includes information or disparaging comments about Evan Penner."In a video captured by a bystander of Penner's arrest on July 4, officers punch and use a taser on Penner before leading him to a police cruiser. He was also pepper sprayed. Penner faces charges including resisting arrest and assaulting a police officer.Watch the video here:The Public Complaints Commission is investigating the officers' actions. It's unclear when that work will be complete.In a lengthy Facebook post Thursday, the police union stated, "The Saskatoon Police Association does not feel it is fair for anyone to provide comments before the all facts of the incident are known."The post then describes some alleged details of the incident."It is important to remember that the officer involved in the incident on July 4th was in lawful execution of his duties and was assaulted," stated the post. "The Saskatoon Police Association unequivocally supports the member involved in this incident."Saskatoon police Chief Troy Cooper also revealed some alleged details about the Penner case this week.In an interview, police association spokesman Dave Larocque said they felt more details were necessary to help the public understand the background of the case."The only reason that we provided that information was to provide context," he said.Laroque said he hopes the public will withhold judgment on both the officers and Penner until the legal process is complete.Stewart said it's also hypocritical that Penner was criminally charged almost immediately after the incident, yet the commission could take months or years to decide if the officers did anything wrong. The lack of independent civilian oversight makes accountability even less likely, she said."Why is the default position that the police are correct? Everyone should be subject to equal scrutiny," Stewart said.Sunchild agreed."Law enforcement has the ability to lay these charges of resisting arrest or assaulting a police officer against a complainant when excessive force is used. That seems to be the trend to justify excessive use of force," Sunchild said. "Had there not been a video in this case, we would have seen only one side of this story, the side of law enforcement."Brian Pfefferle, co-president of the Saskatoon Criminal Defence Lawyers Association, said body cameras would have shown the entire police interaction with Penner. They also would have revealed whether there was more to the story or not, he said."If we want as a society to protect everybody, I'm a firm believer there's no better depicter of the facts that's completely independent and neutral than a video," Pfefferle said.Pfefferle said it's "fair criticism" that citizens are charged immediately, but charges against police take much longer. He said Saskatchewan could learn lessons from B.C., where there's a more rigourous approval process for Crown prosecutors to follow when police recommend certain charges.

  • Times are tough for Canada's self-proclaimed french fry capital
    Lifestyle
    CBC

    Times are tough for Canada's self-proclaimed french fry capital

    For the past few years, Ottawa's Carole Richard has made an annual pilgrimage with her friends to the small town of Alfred, Ont., to sample the local spuds.The village of about 1,200 people on County Road 17 — about 70 kilometres east of Ottawa — is, after all, the self-proclaimed french fry capital of Canada."I like small fries like these, well-cooked, a little dry," said Richard, pausing between bites at the Landriault Snack Bar. "They're super good."These days, however, fried potato enthusiasts like Richard only have one local option for satiating their cravings. Of the multiple chip stands and canteens that once dotted the village, only one — the Landriault Snack Bar — still remains."When we here 10, 11 years ago, there were four," owner Bruce Forget recently told Radio-Canada in a French-language interview."They all disappeared quietly," he said.Some in Alfred trace the decline of the fry shacks to the arrival of a Tim Hortons franchise at the village's entrance.Others cite the 2012 completion of Highway 50 on the Quebec side of the Ottawa River, which allowed motorists travelling between the National Capital Region and Montreal to bypass County Road 17 altogether.There's also the simple fact that the french fry business is hard work — one of the main reasons that Suzanne Villeneuve, owner of Miss Alfred, decided not to open her doors this winter.Had she done so, her canteen would have celebrated its 50th anniversary this year."People can't imagine [how busy it is]," Villeneuve told Radio-Canada in French, noting that all the food at Miss Alfred was homemade."It was 12 hours a day [six days a week]. On the seventh, you changed the oil and then finally took care of your own business."As for Forget, he agrees that running a fry shack is hard work — and is well aware that, when it comes to the village's crispy claim to fame, he's the only one left keeping it alive."I'm the last of the Mohicans," he laughed.

  • News
    CBC

    Crowded Alberta beach sparks COVID-19 concern, online outcry

    A packed weekend gathering at an Alberta beach has sparked COVID-19 concerns from residents and politicians, as pictures of the scene generated critical comments on social media.Pictures began to pop up on Twitter of crowds in Sylvan Lake on Saturday, a beachfront town west of Red Deer. The posts appear to show groups of people closer than the required two-metre separation on a thin stretch of sand fronting the lake, with spillover crowds in the grassy park enclosing the beach. "COVID-19 is still here and we must do our part in limiting the spread," said Alberta Health spokesperson Tom McMillan in a statement to CBC News on Sunday. "We continue to recommend that all Albertans physically distance whenever possible, including when at the beach." Public health orders require people to maintain a minimum two-metre separation at any indoor or outdoor gathering, with certain exceptions. Provincial guidelines offers flexibility for cohort groups, for example, with households permitted to have close interactions with up to 15 people. Sylvan Lake was trending on Twitter Sunday afternoon with certain pictures shared hundreds of times. NDP MLA Janis Irwin commented on a post, saying it was reminiscent of crowded U.S. beaches during recent long weekends. Sylvan Lake, home to about 15,000 residents, swells with thousands of visitors in the summer months as it hosts one of the most accessible beaches for people living in Red Deer, Calgary and Edmonton. At the outset of the pandemic, local officials asked people with summer homes to stay put wherever they spent the winter, noting a local COVID-19 outbreak could overwhelm the healthcare system. Barriers were placed at the entrance of public parking lots around the lake to dissuade would-be beachgoers. But as the province eased public health restrictions and the barriers came down, the beach regained its status as a popular weekend getaway. Last week, the town announced it had deactivated its Emergency Coordination Centre, with decisions related to COVID-19 returned to regular administrative operations.

  • News
    The Canadian Press

    2 officers, suspect killed in Texas border town shooting

    Two police officers were shot and killed Saturday by a suspect who later fatally shot himself in a South Texas border town after responding to a domestic disturbance call, authorities said. McAllen Police Chief Victor Rodriguez identified the slain officers as Edelmiro Garza, 45, and Ismael Chavez, 39. Garza was an officer with the police department for more than eight years while Chavez had over two years of experience.

  • News
    CBC

    WE Charity lays off contract workers who would have administered student service grant

    WE Charity laid off hundreds of contract workers who were brought in to administer the federal government's Canada Student Service Grant, according to a statement from the charity on Saturday.According to the Toronto Star, who first reported the story, WE Charity had hired 465 contract workers before the charity and Ottawa ended their partnership of the CSSG. Subsequently, WE Charity laid off 450 of them, while giving the other 15 full-time positions, the Star reported."With the government funding no longer available we had to make the incredibly difficult decision to end the contracts for those hired to deliver the CSSG program. Additional pay was given based on tenure, in addition to compensation for the time they had worked," the charity said in a statement to CBC News.Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and his government have been under fire since announcing on June 25 they were awarding a $19.5 million sole-source contract to WE Charity to administer the CSSG, a $912 million program offering grants of between $1,000 and $5,000 to post-secondary students in return for supervised volunteer hours.The federal Ethics Commissioner has said he will investigate the decision to award the contract to WE. On Friday, the opposition Conservatives called for a criminal investigation into Trudeau and his ties to the WE Charity after CBC News and Canadaland reported that, despite initial claims, WE had financial dealings with some of Trudeau's family members, most notably his mother Margaret and brother Alexandre.As well, two members of Finance Minister Bill Morneau's family have ties to WE Charity — one of them as a paid contract employee. Morneau did not recuse himself from the Liberal cabinet's consideration of the contract for the charity, CBC News and Canadaland reported.WE Charity said on July 3 it was pulling out of administering CSSG, citing the ongoing controversy surrounding it and the government's decision to give the sole-source contract to WE. Trudeau said the federal government would take over the program."WE Charity made the decision to not take any of the funds that were allocated to pay for the work delivered for the CSSG program. All sunk costs and remaining payments to contractors and vendors are being paid for by WE Charity," the charity said Saturday.

  • Trudeau added to witness list for Finance Committee hearing on WE Charity deal: Poilievre
    Politics
    Global News

    Trudeau added to witness list for Finance Committee hearing on WE Charity deal: Poilievre

    During a press conference in Ottawa on Sunday, Conservative Shadow Minister for Finance Pierre Poilievre announced that Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, along with Finance Minister Bill Morneau, have been added to the witness list for a Finance Committee sitting to "obtain answers" for the Trudeau-WE Charity controversy. The federal government had awarded a now-scrapped $900 million contract with WE Charity that would provide student volunteer funding — despite his family’s ties to the organization.