'Dark times': Aghan Canadian living in Inuvik, N.W.T., fears for loved ones

·2 min read
Horeya Mosavi, now living in Inuvik, N.W.T., has friends and family still living in Afghanistan. She describes the country's present moment as 'really, dark times.' (Mackenzie Scott - image credit)
Horeya Mosavi, now living in Inuvik, N.W.T., has friends and family still living in Afghanistan. She describes the country's present moment as 'really, dark times.' (Mackenzie Scott - image credit)

"It's really, really dark times," Horeya Mosavi, an Afghan Canadian living in Inuvik, N.W.T., said of the current Taliban occupied Afghanistan.

Mosavi, herself a Canadian citizen, has been in Canada for the last two decades but still has loved ones in Afghanistan.

"They're not safe," she said.

Mosavi is thinking in particular about her aunt, a mother of four living in the country. As a member of the Hazara ethnic minority, and a single woman, she is especially at risk, Mosavi said, adding that she's learned the Taliban has issued a statement saying that all single women from early teens to middle aged would be required to marry an Afghan fighter.

"She doesn't know if someone will knock on her door and come inside and tell her to show her ID," Mosavi said on CBC's The Trailbreaker Friday morning.

She explained her aunt has deleted all her photos, burned her books and rid herself of music in the house as art is effectively banned under the Taliban's regime.

"You can imagine how difficult it would be to be in this situation."

Submitted by Horeya Mosavi
Submitted by Horeya Mosavi

Mosavi has spent recent days contacting Canadian politicians, pleading to get her aunt and other relatives a spot on an outgoing plane, despite Canada's limited capacity to airlift residents out of Afghanistan.

She stays in touch with her family as much as she can, but worries when it's been too long without a check-in. Thursday night, she heard from her uncle for the first time in days. He called to report that he had successfully fled Afghanistan and landed safely in Kuwait.

Mosavi said she was relieved to hear from him, but that getting out is a huge challenge.

"Unfortunately," she said, solutions are few and far between.

"I'm just hoping somehow there's a political way to bring some sort of stability and safety," she said.

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