Dennis Oland's house that featured prominently at his murder trials has sold

·4 min read
Dennis Oland's home in Rothesay, which was linked to money problems with his slain father, has sold. (Roger Cosman/CBC - image credit)
Dennis Oland's home in Rothesay, which was linked to money problems with his slain father, has sold. (Roger Cosman/CBC - image credit)

Dennis Oland's family homestead, which featured prominently at his two murder trials in the death of his father, and was at the centre of a marital dispute with his second wife, has been sold to a local buyer.

A "sold" sign popped up outside 58 Gondola Point Rd., in Rothesay, over the weekend.

The five-bedroom house, which sits on 0.65 hectares, was listed for sale at the end of January for $749,000.

The new owner is not yet listed on Service New Brunswick's online property records.

Realtor Bob McVicar confirmed the sale but declined to divulge the identity of the new owner, saying the transaction has not yet officially closed.

He did confirm the buyer is local and intends to use the property as a home, as far as he knows.

McVicar said "a lot" of people looked at the property and more than one made an offer.

"There was lots of enthusiasm around the property, lots of people were interested and we found a local buyer who wants to live there," he said.

The house previously belonged to Oland's grandfather, Moosehead Breweries scion Philip Oland.

"After 23 years and almost 85 years in the family it is now time to sell our home," Dennis Oland had posted on Facebook on Jan. 22.

"For anyone looking for a truly wonderful and well built house, this is it."

Dennis Oland highlighted the home's English ivy and wisteria vines as among some of its best features in a Facebook post in January when it was listed for sale.
Dennis Oland highlighted the home's English ivy and wisteria vines as among some of its best features in a Facebook post in January when it was listed for sale.(Court exhibit)

He cited the three-car garage with a second-storey apartment, the hen house, garden shed, variety of large trees, English gardens, fenced-in vegetable garden, grape vines "and of course Hop vines" as among the highlights.

"In summer the house is completely in bloom with English Ivy and Wisteria vines," he wrote.

Oland put the property up for sale shortly after he and his estranged wife, Lisa Andrik-Oland, reached a settlement in a family court dispute.

Dennis Oland and Lisa Andrik-Oland, pictured here arriving at the law courts in Saint John during his murder retrial, have been estranged since February 2020, according to court documents.
Dennis Oland and Lisa Andrik-Oland, pictured here arriving at the law courts in Saint John during his murder retrial, have been estranged since February 2020, according to court documents.(Andrew Vaughan/Canadian Press)

Last summer — nearly a year after Oland was acquitted of second-degree murder in the 2011 bludgeoning death of his father, multimillionaire Richard Oland — Andrik-Oland launched legal action under the Marital Property Act and Family Services Act.

She was seeking an interim order to prevent Oland from selling the home and the three adjacent properties to preserve her marital interest in them, pending a final determination in the matter.

Andrik-Oland was also seeking a freezing of family assets, ownership of the house and its contents, an equal division of marital property and debt, spousal support, as well as a restraining order.

A hearing was scheduled for Nov. 10, but it was removed from the docket.

Accused of domestic violence

The couple had previously reached an interim agreement. This occurred after Andrik-Oland accused Oland of domestic violence and was granted an emergency intervention order under the Intimate Partner Violence Intervention Act, the details of which were under a publication ban.

On Jan. 14, Court of Queen's Bench Chief Justice Tracey DeWare ruled the media could publish details about Andrik-Oland's allegations.

Andrik-Oland has appealed. A hearing date has not yet been set.

None of the allegations has been proven in court.

Moved out last February

Oland moved out of the marital home on Feb. 17 and announced March 23 that they were separating after a decade of marriage, according to a sworn affidavit Andrik-Oland filed with the court.

He "told me that we have no money and that everything we owned will be sold," including the house, she said.

The property, which has been listed solely in Oland's name since before the couple married, is assessed at $509,900.

Richard Oland, 69, was found dead in his Saint John office on July 7, 2011.
Richard Oland, 69, was found dead in his Saint John office on July 7, 2011.(Canadian Yachting Association)

During Oland's trial and retrial, the court heard his father Richard lent him more than $500,000 when he divorced from his first wife in 2008-2009, to ensure he didn't lose the family home.

Oland bounced two interest payments of $1,666.67 to his father, including one the day before Richard Oland was killed, which the Crown had alleged was part of the motive for murder.

Richard Oland, 69, was found dead in his Saint John office on July 7, 2011. He had suffered 45 sharp- and blunt-force injuries to his head, neck and hands.

His son was the last known person to have seen him alive during a visit to his office the night before. No weapon was ever found.

A jury found Oland guilty of second-degree murder in 2015. He was acquitted in 2019 following his murder retrial by judge alone.

The Saint John Police Force is not actively investigating the homicide of Richard Oland, but will consider any additional information or evidence that comes to their attention, former chief Bruce Connell has said.

The Oland family has offered a reward for information that might help find the killer. No dollar amount has been provided.