Diem Saunders' death in Happy Valley-Goose Bay not suspicious: RCMP

·1 min read
Diem Saunders, formerly Delilah Saunders, speaks during the National Inquiry into Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls, in Membertou, N.S., on Oct. 30, 2017. (Andrew Vaughan/The Canadian Press - image credit)
Diem Saunders, formerly Delilah Saunders, speaks during the National Inquiry into Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls, in Membertou, N.S., on Oct. 30, 2017. (Andrew Vaughan/The Canadian Press - image credit)
Andrew Vaughan/The Canadian Press
Andrew Vaughan/The Canadian Press

The death of a 29-year-old Labradorian this week is deemed not criminal in nature, the RCMP confirmed in a news release Thursday.

Diem Saunders, formerly Delilah Saunders, was found dead Tuesday in a Happy Valley-Goose Bay home.

Their death sent shockwaves through the communities in Atlantic Canada where they fought to protect the rights of Indigenous women.

Saunders became involved in the National Inquiry Into Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls when their sibling, Loretta Saunders, was murdered in Halifax in 2014. Those efforts were recognized with Amnesty International's Ambassador of Conscience Award in 2017.

That same year, Saunders made national news in Canada after suffering liver failure and being denied a transplant due to a history of alcohol abuse.

The story sparked a nationwide debate over Ontario's requirement that candidates for liver transplants abstain from alcohol for six months prior to being accepted for a transplant.

Saunders was also celebrated for their involvement in the protests against the flooding of the Muskrat Falls reservoir, which threatened to raise methylmercury levels in Indigenous fishing and hunting areas in Labrador.

Read more from CBC Newfoundland and Labrador

Our goal is to create a safe and engaging place for users to connect over interests and passions. In order to improve our community experience, we are temporarily suspending article commenting