Dinosaurs & Fossils News

People protesting against Shell Oil greet President Obama's motorcade as he arrives to deliver remarks to the GLACIER Conference at the Dena'ina Civic and Convention Center in Anchorage, Alaska

With glaciers as backdrop, Obama to use Alaska trip to push climate agenda

By Roberta Rampton ANCHORAGE, Alaska (Reuters) - President Barack Obama arrived in Alaska on Monday for a three-day tour aimed at spotlighting how its melting permafrost and eroding coastlines show the United States is already being hurt by climate change. With 16 months left in office, Obama is trying to build support for tough new rules on carbon emissions from power plants ahead of a hoped-fo…

  • Workers clean photovoltaic panels inside a solar power plant in Gujarat
    India seeks SoftBank push for Modi's solar goal Reuters - 10 hours ago

    By Krishna N. Das NEW DELHI (Reuters) - India has closed bids for a third of its target of tendering 15,000 megawatts (MW) of solar projects this fiscal year, a government … More »India seeks SoftBank push for Modi's solar goal

    Workers clean photovoltaic panels inside a solar power plant in Gujarat

    By Krishna N. Das NEW DELHI (Reuters) - India has closed bids for a third of its target of tendering 15,000 megawatts (MW) of solar projects this fiscal year, a government official said, and is expecting interest from investors such as SoftBank <9984.T> to lift the industry. The tenders are part of Prime Minister Narendra …

  • U.S. President Obama delivers a speech at the Andrew P. Sanchez Community Center in Lower Ninth Ward of New Orleans, Louisiana
    Obama heads north to Alaska, where drilling decision looms large Reuters - Sat, 29 Aug, 2015

    By Roberta Rampton WASHINGTON (Reuters) - President Barack Obama on Saturday defended his decision to allow Royal Dutch Shell to drill for oil in the Arctic Ocean under … More »Obama heads north to Alaska, where drilling decision looms large

    U.S. President Obama delivers a speech at the Andrew P. Sanchez Community Center in Lower Ninth Ward of New Orleans, Louisiana

    By Roberta Rampton WASHINGTON (Reuters) - President Barack Obama on Saturday defended his decision to allow Royal Dutch Shell to drill for oil in the Arctic Ocean under what he said were rigorous standards, fending off criticism by environmental groups. The trip is part of a broad campaign to seal an international deal …

  • Catastrophic Volcanoes Blamed for Earth's Biggest Extinction
    Catastrophic Volcanoes Blamed for Earth's Biggest Extinction LiveScience.com - Fri, 28 Aug, 2015

    Geologists hauling hundreds of pounds of 250-million-year-old rocks from Siberia, through Russian and American customs, say luck was on their side. Not only did they … More »Catastrophic Volcanoes Blamed for Earth's Biggest Extinction

    Catastrophic Volcanoes Blamed for Earth's Biggest Extinction

    Geologists hauling hundreds of pounds of 250-million-year-old rocks from Siberia, through Russian and American customs, say luck was on their side. Not only did they successfully transport the huge haul, but they also may have confirmed the cause of Earth's worst mass extinction. Catastrophic volcanic eruptions that spewed …

  • File photo of International Energy Agency (IEA) Chief Economist Fatih Birol speaking during a news conference in Istanbul
    New IEA boss faces world energy landscape in flux Reuters - Fri, 28 Aug, 2015

    By Michel Rose and Barbara Lewis PARIS/BRUSSELS (Reuters) - The new head of the International Energy Agency faces dilemmas that challenge the purpose of the body set … More »New IEA boss faces world energy landscape in flux

    File photo of International Energy Agency (IEA) Chief Economist Fatih Birol speaking during a news conference in Istanbul

    By Michel Rose and Barbara Lewis PARIS/BRUSSELS (Reuters) - The new head of the International Energy Agency faces dilemmas that challenge the purpose of the body set up to protect the interests of the West against the power of OPEC in the 1970s. Fatih Birol of Turkey -- the IEA's respected chief economist -- takes over …

  • Heavy metal pollution may have contributed to some of largest extinction events ANI - Wed, 26 Aug, 2015

    Washington D.C., Aug 26 (ANI): A 415-million-year-old malformed fossil plankton has revealed that heavy metal pollution might have contributed to some of the world's … More »Heavy metal pollution may have contributed to some of largest extinction events

    Washington D.C., Aug 26 (ANI): A 415-million-year-old malformed fossil plankton has revealed that heavy metal pollution might have contributed to some of the world's largest extinction events.

  • Flags of E.ON are seen before the annual meeting of German utility giant E.ON in Essen
    Germany's E.ON banks on U.S. in renewables expansion Reuters - Wed, 26 Aug, 2015

    By Christoph Steitz BERLIN (Reuters) - Germany's E.ON plans to expand its solar and wind business in the United States, an executive said, as the utility strives to … More »Germany's E.ON banks on U.S. in renewables expansion

    Flags of E.ON are seen before the annual meeting of German utility giant E.ON in Essen

    By Christoph Steitz BERLIN (Reuters) - Germany's E.ON plans to expand its solar and wind business in the United States, an executive said, as the utility strives to bolster its renewable energy operations ahead of a planned spin-off of its ailing fossil-fuel power plants. E.ON took markets by surprise last year when it …

  • Short time between pregnancies linked to osteoporosis Reuters - Tue, 25 Aug, 2015

    By Lisa Rapaport (Reuters Health) - Women who have pregnancies less than a year apart may have a greater risk for osteoporosis later in life than those who wait longer … More »Short time between pregnancies linked to osteoporosis

    By Lisa Rapaport (Reuters Health) - Women who have pregnancies less than a year apart may have a greater risk for osteoporosis later in life than those who wait longer between babies, a study suggests. Researchers compared the reproductive histories of 239 postmenopausal women with osteoporosis to 298 similar women without …

  • Origins of 'Gospel of Jesus's Wife' Begin to Emerge
    Origins of 'Gospel of Jesus's Wife' Begin to Emerge LiveScience.com - Tue, 25 Aug, 2015

    The truth may be finally emerging about the "Gospel of Jesus's Wife," a highly controversial papyrus suggesting that some people, in ancient times, believed Jesus was … More »Origins of 'Gospel of Jesus's Wife' Begin to Emerge

    Origins of 'Gospel of Jesus's Wife' Begin to Emerge

    The truth may be finally emerging about the "Gospel of Jesus's Wife," a highly controversial papyrus suggesting that some people, in ancient times, believed Jesus was married to Mary Magdalene. Debate about the credibility of the "gospel" began as soon as Harvard University professor Karen King reported her discovery of …

  • Solar panels are pictured on the rooftops of residential homes in San Diego, California
    Obama aims to boost homeowner renewable energy use Reuters - Mon, 24 Aug, 2015

    By Julia Edwards LAS VEGAS (Reuters) - President Barack Obama on Monday expanded his push for greater renewable energy adoption, announcing fresh financial incentives … More »Obama aims to boost homeowner renewable energy use

    Solar panels are pictured on the rooftops of residential homes in San Diego, California

    By Julia Edwards LAS VEGAS (Reuters) - President Barack Obama on Monday expanded his push for greater renewable energy adoption, announcing fresh financial incentives for solar power development and use. The steps include an additional $1 billion in loan guarantees for new research projects and near-term savings for homeowners …

  • Free Pass! National Parks Waive Admissions Fee on Tuesday
    Free Pass! National Parks Waive Admissions Fee on Tuesday LiveScience.com - Mon, 24 Aug, 2015

    In celebration of its 99th birthday, the U.S. National Park Service (NPS) is providing free admission to all of its sites for one day next week. Next Tuesday (Aug. 25), … More »Free Pass! National Parks Waive Admissions Fee on Tuesday

    Free Pass! National Parks Waive Admissions Fee on Tuesday

    In celebration of its 99th birthday, the U.S. National Park Service (NPS) is providing free admission to all of its sites for one day next week. Next Tuesday (Aug. 25), people can visit any of the NPS' 408 sites across the country, including popular spots such as Joshua Tree National Park in California and the Wright Brothers …

  • Laundry hang on a washing line near an inflatable swimming pool in the courtyard of a house in the 1920s Bon Air housing estate in Brussels
    Low-energy, healthy homes: Europe's answer to shale gas? Reuters - Mon, 24 Aug, 2015

    By Barbara Lewis BRUSSELS (Reuters) - With street names such as Temperance and Hygiene and plenty of green open spaces, the 1920s Bon Air (Good Air) housing estate in … More »Low-energy, healthy homes: Europe's answer to shale gas?

    Laundry hang on a washing line near an inflatable swimming pool in the courtyard of a house in the 1920s Bon Air housing estate in Brussels

    By Barbara Lewis BRUSSELS (Reuters) - With street names such as Temperance and Hygiene and plenty of green open spaces, the 1920s Bon Air (Good Air) housing estate in a working-class district of Brussels was meant to provide a healthy "garden city" way of life. Now 21st-century planners are striving to turn it into a …

  • Skull of Earliest Baboon Discovered
    Skull of Earliest Baboon Discovered LiveScience.com - Mon, 24 Aug, 2015

    A 2-million-year-old skull unearthed in South Africa belongs to the earliest baboon ever found, a new study finds. Researchers discovered the partial cranium at Malapa, … More »Skull of Earliest Baboon Discovered

    Skull of Earliest Baboon Discovered

    A 2-million-year-old skull unearthed in South Africa belongs to the earliest baboon ever found, a new study finds. Researchers discovered the partial cranium at Malapa, a Cradle of Humankind World Heritage Site filled with caves and fossil deposits and located about 31 miles (50 kilometers) northwest of Johannesburg.  …

  • Human Ancestors May Have Butchered Animals 3.4 Million Years Ago
    Human Ancestors May Have Butchered Animals 3.4 Million Years Ago LiveScience.com - Sat, 22 Aug, 2015

    Cut marks on two 3.4-million-year-old animal bones from Ethiopia were thought to be evidence that the beasts had been trampled by other animals long ago, but new research … More »Human Ancestors May Have Butchered Animals 3.4 Million Years Ago

    Human Ancestors May Have Butchered Animals 3.4 Million Years Ago

    Cut marks on two 3.4-million-year-old animal bones from Ethiopia were thought to be evidence that the beasts had been trampled by other animals long ago, but new research suggests that's not the case. The new results debunk one theory for how the bones got their marks, and support — but do not, on their own, definitively …

  • German scientists find rare dinosaur tracks Reuters - Fri, 21 Aug, 2015

    By Josie Le Blond BERLIN (Reuters) - German scientists have found an unusually long trail of footprints from a 30-tonne dinosaur in an abandoned quarry in Lower Saxony, … More »German scientists find rare dinosaur tracks

    By Josie Le Blond BERLIN (Reuters) - German scientists have found an unusually long trail of footprints from a 30-tonne dinosaur in an abandoned quarry in Lower Saxony, a discovery they think could be around 145 million years old. "It's very unusual how long the trail is and what great condition it's in," excavation leader …

  • Why California's Droughts are Just Going to Get Worse (Op-Ed)
    Why California's Droughts are Just Going to Get Worse (Op-Ed) LiveScience.com - Fri, 21 Aug, 2015

    California is now well into its fourth consecutive year of drought. Tensions in the state have mounted as urban and agricultural water users become increasingly stressed … More »Why California's Droughts are Just Going to Get Worse (Op-Ed)

    Why California's Droughts are Just Going to Get Worse (Op-Ed)

    California is now well into its fourth consecutive year of drought. Tensions in the state have mounted as urban and agricultural water users become increasingly stressed by water shortages — but we can't blame the almond farmers. There are many factors at play here, notably a complex water cycle and conveyance network, …