Dishin’ and Swishin’: Local Colleges Sink Shots to Help Fight Hunger

Food Lion Feeds to Donate 200 meals* for Each Free Throw Made This Men’s Basketball Season

Food Lion Feeds is dishing out assists to seven North Carolina and Virginia colleges and universities this men’s basketball season by donating 200 meals* for each foul shot swished by participating schools. Through the inaugural "Score to Give More" campaign, Food Lion Feeds will donate the meals to the local Feeding America® member food bank, up to 30,000 meals per school.

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"We’re excited to partner with these great schools and their student athletes to help fight hunger on campus, in their local communities and beyond," said Emma Inman, director of external communications and community relations for Food Lion. "Far too many of our neighbors have to make impossible choices between things like gas and groceries, or dinner and rent. 'Score to Give More' is a great way to join together to help eliminate some of these difficult choices."

The "Score to Give More" program comes only a few weeks after the conclusion of Food Lion Feeds’ "Sack to Give Back" initiative, in which Food Lion Feeds partnered with 11 local colleges and universities to donate 1,000 meals for every quarterback sack, which totaled 279,000 meals.

The participating colleges and local Feeding America member food banks are listed below:

  • Clemson University – Golden Harvest Food Bank
  • Duke University – Inter-Faith Food Shuttle
  • North Carolina State University – Food Bank of Central & Eastern North Carolina
  • University of North Carolina – Inter-Faith Food Shuttle
  • University of Richmond – Feed More
  • Virginia Tech University – Feeding America Southwest Virginia
  • Wake Forest University – Second Harvest of Northwest NC Food Bank

For more information on Food Lion’s commitment to end hunger in the towns and cities it serves through Food Lion Feeds, please visit www.foodlion.com/feeds.

*$1 helps provide at least 10 meals secured by Feeding America on behalf of local member food banks.

About Food Lion
Food Lion, based in Salisbury, N.C., since 1957, has more than 1,000 stores in 10 Southeastern and Mid-Atlantic states and employs more than 63,000 associates. By leveraging its longstanding heritage of low prices and convenient locations, Food Lion is working to own the easiest full shop grocery experience in the Southeast, anchored by a strong commitment to affordability, freshness and the communities it serves. Through Food Lion Feeds, the company has donated more than 500 million meals to individuals and families since 2014, and has committed to donate 1 billion more meals by 2025. Food Lion is a company of Ahold Delhaize USA, the U.S. division of Zaandam-based Ahold Delhaize. For more information, visit www.foodlion.com.

View source version on businesswire.com: https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20200123005523/en/

Contacts

Kelly Powell
704-310-3886
kelly.powell@foodlion.com

  • Demonstrators backing Wet'suwet'en hereditary chiefs spend the night at Confederation Bridge
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    CBC

    Demonstrators backing Wet'suwet'en hereditary chiefs spend the night at Confederation Bridge

    At least four people spent the night at Confederation Bridge to show their support for the Wet'suwet'en hereditary chiefs, who oppose the Coastal GasLink natural gas pipeline on their territory in northern B.C..More than two dozen demonstrators with flags and signs first gathered Sunday afternoon.They set up at a median on the road leading to the bridge. While traffic was slowed, vehicles were able to proceed across the bridge.On Monday morning a fire was still going at the demonstrators' camp on the P.E.I. side of the Confederation Bridge. RCMP said the night was peaceful and the road remained open.More demonstrators rejoined the camp as the sun rose Monday.The people who were there all night say they plan to stay throughout the day, as well.In a statement on behalf of the Epekwitk Assembly of Councils, Chief Darlene Bernard and Chief Junior Gould said they support the peaceful protest, but acknowledge that some First Nations support the pipeline."We respect the environmental concerns raised by the Wet'suwet'en hereditary Chiefs and we also acknowledge and respect the decisions made by over 20 First Nations, including most Wet'suwet'en First Nations, that have signed impact benefits agreements with [Coastal GasLink] and currently support the pipeline," they said.The statement said it's important the matter be resolved peacefully and "within the law.""What Islanders and Canadians need to understand is that these protests happening across the country, and now in P.E.I., are about more than just the Wet'suwet'en situation."They are about centuries of Canada's Indigenous people being denied access to the land and resources, they are about centuries of economic and social marginalization," the statement said.A national storyThe Wet'suwet'en hereditary chiefs say the representatives from 20 First Nations who consented to this project were established by the Indian Act and only have authority over reserve lands.Members of the Mohawk First Nation in eastern Ontario have been supporting of the hereditary chiefs. The blockade, near Belleville, prompted CN Rail to close its Eastern Canadian freight train network, and Via Rail has cancelled passenger trains nationwide because of demonstrations taking place along or on railway tracks.

  • India summons Turkish envoy over Erdogan's remarks on Kashmir
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    Reuters

    India summons Turkish envoy over Erdogan's remarks on Kashmir

    India summoned the Turkish ambassador on Monday to lodge a diplomatic protest over President Tayyip Erdogan's remarks on the disputed region of Kashmir and warned it would have a bearing on bilateral ties. During a visit to Pakistan last week, Erdogan said the situation in Indian Kashmir was worsening because of sweeping changes New Delhi introduced in the Muslim-majority territory and that Turkey stood in solidarity with the people of Kashmir.

  • Online petition calling for inquiry into Colten Boushie shooting gets thousands of signatures
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    CBC

    Online petition calling for inquiry into Colten Boushie shooting gets thousands of signatures

    An online petition calling for a public inquiry into the shooting death of Colten Boushie has garnered thousands of signatures — but the provincial government says the incident has already been thoroughly covered during a criminal trial.Colten Boushie, 22, was shot and killed after he and four others from the Red Pheasant Cree Nation drove onto Gerald Stanley's farm in August 2016. In the subsequent criminal trial, Stanley, 56, testified he was trying to scare the group off and accidentally shot Boushie in the head.  The jury found Stanley not guilty of second-degree murder, igniting a firestorm of debate in the weeks that followed. "The conditions for an inquest have been fulfilled by the criminal trial and there is nothing further to establish in this case that has not been covered by a public criminal trial," according to a statement provided by Saskatchewan's Ministry of Justice. "We understand some people were disappointed in the verdict," the statement went on. "However, there is no indication that the jury's decision was guided by anything other than the trial evidence and the judge's instructions."Acquittal 'enforces systemic discrimination'The petition was launched last week on change.org by Andre Bear, an Indigenous law student at the University of Saskatchewan in Saskatoon. As of Friday, it had garnered 3,979 virtual signatures. In the petition, Bear wrote that Stanley's acquittal "enforces systemic discrimination embedded in the legal system and has failed to uphold justice in Canada."Bear, who is Cree and a member of the Canoe Lake First Nation, cited "the selection of an all-white jury" as a concern. CBC News cannot verify the race of the 12 jurors selected for the trial, but at the time, the Boushie family said they were angered that Indigenous-looking jury candidates were challenged and excluded by Stanely's defence team."We have a right to be to be judged by or among our own peers," Bear said Friday. "If there is an Indigenous person that is [a] victim....there should be at least one Indigenous person on that jury no matter what. That is our charter right."The federal government has now eliminated the practice of peremptory challenges, although at least one judge has since overturned that decision.Bear's petition outlined a number of other concerns, including the "flawed" RCMP investigation (already the subject of an ongoing civilian review) and the Saskatchwan Crown's decision not to appeal the Stanley verdict. "This had been one of the most important cases in my lifetime as a young person in this province," Bear said. "I think it's irrefutable — the fact that there was not a public inquiry that's been done. And so I'm hoping that this petition can create more awareness and keep this on the agenda."Bear said he has the support of Boushie's mother and uncle. "The [case] serves as just one stark example of the failure of the criminal justice system to treat Indigenous victims, offenders, and their families fairly with dignity and respect," according to Bear's petition. "The need to address it remains increasingly important to meet the Government's commitment of reconciliation."5 Indigenous provincial judges appointedIn its statement, the Saskatchewan Ministry of Justice said five judges who have self-declared as Indigenous have been appointed to the Provincial Court of Saskatoon since January 2018, the month the Stanley trial began. The province also cited ongoing work with the Elders Advisory Committee, which gives advice on justice-related issues and programs. "Racism and intolerance have no place in Saskatchewan," the statement said. "We need collaborative, respectful dialogues about the issues facing our communities."The government is working on the Calls to Action of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission that fall under provincial authority and jurisdiction. "We know that reconciliation will require continuous and respectful engagement with Indigenous people to ensure every community's voice is heard within the justice system."'Much work still needed': feds Bear said his petition was also directed to the federal government. "The death of Colten Boushie was a tragedy, and our government continues to share in the grief of the Boushie family," a statement provided Friday by the Office of the Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada said. "We are committed to advancing reconciliation and addressing systemic issues involving Indigenous peoples and the criminal justice system."The statement pointed to the abolishment of peremptory challenges. "We have also worked in partnership with Indigenous communities, provinces and territories to increase the use of restorative justice programs," according to the statement."There is much work still needed and we are committed to continuing to make progress in partnership with Indigenous peoples. This includes working hand-in-hand with First Nations, Inuit and Métis peoples on the implementation of the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples."

  • Why the Democrats might be on track for a contested convention
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    CBC

    Why the Democrats might be on track for a contested convention

    The race for the Democratic nomination has a front runner and his name is Bernie Sanders. But does that mean he's the candidate most likely to take on Donald Trump in November?Not exactly.There's one obvious reason why it's way too early to say Sanders will be named the nominee at the Democratic National Convention in July. Only two states have voted and more than 98 per cent of delegates have yet to be awarded. A lot can happen over the next five months.Sanders's support has proved resilient, though. There is every indication he can keep up this pace.But while this pace might be good enough to win more delegates than any of his rivals, it might not be brisk enough to win him a majority. That would result in a contested convention in Milwaukee — with a potentially unpredictable outcome.The rules governing Democratic primaries and caucuses differ from state to state, but they generally give all registered Democrats (and, in some cases, Independents and even Republicans) a chance to vote.But the process determines the allegiance of the 3,979 delegates who get to go to the Democratic National Convention. Normally, the eventual nominee has already secured a majority of delegates by that point, making the vote a formality.That might not happen this time. If it doesn't, the decision on who becomes the next Democratic nominee will be made by delegates on the convention floor — much like the delegated conventions that, until recently, were common in Canada.On this side of the border, these conventions have generated some unexpected outcomes. Stéphane Dion was the compromise candidate who won the 2006 Liberal leadership race, despite finishing in third place on the first ballot behind frontrunners Michael Ignatieff and Bob Rae. Joe Clark (in 1976) and Brian Mulroney (in 1983) both became the Progressive Conservative leaders without leading on the first ballot.It's too early to even speculate about what might happen if the Democrats wind up in a contested convention. Everything would depend on who's still in the running and how many delegates they have. But it isn't too early to recognize that, unless there is an important shift in the race, there's a strong possibility that the party is on track for a long, hot summer of internecine politics.Sanders vs. the moderatesIt really comes down to math. Sanders just might not have the numbers working in his favour.The Vermont senator won the most votes in both the Iowa caucuses and the New Hampshire primary, but he doesn't have the delegates to show for it. Though delegates are largely awarded proportionally, that sharing-out can depend on how each candidate's vote is regionally distributed. According to the latest estimates, Sanders has 21 delegates compared to 23 for Pete Buttigieg, the former mayor of South Bend, Indiana.Sanders's results in Iowa and New Hampshire were relatively modest — 26 per cent of the vote in both contests. That kind of result is enough to top a divided field, but it doesn't deliver a lot of delegates.Sanders is cornering one big segment of the Democratic electorate while his rivals split up the rest. According to entrance and exit polls from the two states, just under a quarter of voters considered themselves "very liberal." Sanders averaged 44.5 per cent of the vote in the two states among these voters, putting him 21 points ahead of Massachusetts Senator Elizabeth Warren.Among "somewhat liberal" voters (about two-fifths of the electorate in the two states), Sanders ran nearly even with Buttigieg.Only among "moderate" voters (about a third of the Democratic electorate) did Sanders run behind. Buttigieg averaged 26 per cent among these voters, putting him narrowly ahead of Minnesota Senator Amy Klobuchar (23.5 per cent). Former vice-president Joe Biden followed with 18 per cent. Sanders took 14 per cent and Warren just five per cent.Better performances among moderates would have delivered both Iowa and New Hampshire to Sanders easily. But he will keep winning as long as he continues to be competitive among more centrist Democrats, runs up the numbers among progressives and lets his rivals divvy up the pie of moderates among them.A very long road to 1,990It looks like the field will continue to be divided for some time to come. In the wake of his poor showing so far, Biden's support in national polls has been dropping. But no moderate candidate has been the sole beneficiary of Biden's slide; Buttigieg and Klobuchar are both making gains, as is former New York mayor Michael Bloomberg.Support for Buttigieg and Klobuchar, however, remains relatively modest — and Bloomberg isn't even contesting the first four states on the primary calendar (Nevada on Feb. 22 and South Carolina on Feb. 29 are next).The race heats up on March 3, when 14 states (and American Samoa) vote in what's known as "Super Tuesday." Sanders is likely to do well across the board — his support is relatively uniform across the country and among different demographic groups. That means Sanders is likely to emerge from Super Tuesday with a lot of delegates, while each of his opponents are well-positioned to win delegates in certain parts of the country. Biden is banking on the South, due to his strong support among African Americans. Buttigieg could contend in less diverse states and Klobuchar and Warren in their home states. Bloomberg is looking like he could do well — particularly in places where he has spent tens of millions of dollars of his own money on campaign ads.According to the forecast estimates from FiveThirtyEight, Sanders hypothetically could come out of Super Tuesday with nearly 40 per cent of the delegates — roughly twice as many as any of his rivals.That's a problem. Assuming Sanders is somewhere around 600 delegates, that would put him about 1,400 shy of what he would need on the convention floor to win a majority. But after Super Tuesday, only about 2,500 delegates will still be up for grabs. That means Sanders would need to win more than 55 per cent of delegates in the remaining caucuses and primaries.That's a tall order for a candidate who hasn't polled higher than 30 per cent throughout this election cycle and won just 45 per cent of delegates against a single opponent (Hillary Clinton) in the 2016 primaries.To avoid a contested convention, Sanders will need to separate himself from the field — while hoping it stays divided. There is a decent prospect the field will remain fractured and a contested convention looks like a real possibility — which would serve as an incentive for candidates to stay in the running and take their chances on the convention floor. But if Sanders does separate himself from his divided opponents, there's a greater chance that the field (and voters) will consolidate behind a single moderate.Perhaps developments in the next few weeks will make this discussion moot. But it seems the major moderate candidates are, for the time being at least, prepared to stick it out for the long haul.With only two states having voted, it's obvious that this race is far from over. But it could take a lot longer than usual for the likely nominee to emerge.

  • 'Keep talking, that is the way forward': Heritage Day commemorates Africville
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    CBC

    'Keep talking, that is the way forward': Heritage Day commemorates Africville

    For Juanita Peters, the Africville story needs to be told and retold.Nova Scotia's 2020 Heritage Day honours Africville, the African-Nova Scotian community expropriated and demolished by the city of Halifax in the 1960s, forcing hundreds from their homes.It wasn't until decades later, in 2010, the municipality formally apologized to the African-Nova Scotian families that lost their homes and their community."It's about the history of us as a people, African-Nova Scotians," Peters, executive director of the Africville Museum, told CBC Nova Scotia's Mainstreet."It's Canadian history, and it's not that historical. It wasn't that long ago that this tragic event happened."Peters said she was "thrilled" to find out Heritage Day is honouring Africville this year."There's so much to tell, there's such a big story. There's so much history, and so much in the future that we want to explore," she said.'Celebrating community'People will gather at the site of the former settlement for a day of dedications and celebration, including sledding through Africville, serving hot chocolate and sandwiches, and a special announcement at 11 a.m.The events will continue at the Halifax Stanfield International Airport, where another ceremony will be held at an Africville display set up in the terminal about a year ago. "It's just about celebrating community, celebrating the different peoples of Halifax," she said.Though this year's Heritage Day remembers a dark part of Nova Scotia's history, Peters said it's "extremely important" for the story Africville to be shared."We have to first acknowledge what has happened and talk about what could make it right today … as long as you keep talking, that is the way forward," Peters said.MORE TOP STORIES

  • Two fathers demand action against Japan over parental child abduction
    News
    Reuters

    Two fathers demand action against Japan over parental child abduction

    Two European fathers who live in Japan will urge EU lawmakers this week to increase pressure on Tokyo to tackle parental child abduction by changing a law that does not recognize joint child custody following divorce. Frenchman Vincent Fichot and Italian Tommaso Perina will present a petition to the bloc's legislative assembly in Brussels on Wednesday to demand action against cases of so-called parental child abduction affecting Europeans living in Japan. The two men -- who both became estranged from their children after their Japanese wives took them without consent -- say Japan should be sanctioned for breaching its human rights obligation under the EU-Japan Strategic Partnership Agreement.

  • Seniors study aims to find out if medical cannabis can ease common ailments of aging
    News
    CBC

    Seniors study aims to find out if medical cannabis can ease common ailments of aging

    Mike Walker can no longer have a simple conversation with his wife.It was just four years ago, at the young age of 52, when Karen was originally diagnosed with dementia. She no longer speaks, and also suffers from agitation and physical outbursts with aggression, which can be common with the disease."You just can't give up on somebody, you gotta try whatever means that are out there," Mike says.Karen has been in a long-term care facility for almost a year, and she's now part of a study by Canopy Growth and the Ontario Long Term Care Association. She is taking 20 milligrams of cannabidiol (CBD) oil twice a day, and Mike believes he has seen her level of agitation improve."I mean, she still gets her outbursts, but not near what it used to be. I know that it was a lot more severe there for quite awhile," he says.As one of the country's largest medical and recreational cannabis companies, Canopy Growth, along with its subsidiary Spectrum Therapeutics, is testing medical cannabis as a possible treatment for patients suffering from pain or cognitive issues.The research involves 100 seniors in long-term care homes across the province, and the goal is to register another 100. The study is set to continue in Ontario over the next six months.Residents have been enrolled in waves and the program is expected to wrap up its data collection at the end of the year.The goal of the research is to determine how effective cannabidiol is at treating some of the ailments common to seniors, and whether there are side effects.Mike says he would do anything to help soothe Karen's pain and confusion. Since Karen started taking part in the study, he says he has seen a difference in her behaviour."I find her more aware," he says.On his regular visits, for example, he plays music for her on his cellphone. "Before, I would take my phone out and she would grab it and throw it across the floor. Now, I hold the phone with music on it and I would show her pictures of her grandkids and she would have a big smile."Pain, mood and sleepThe recruitment process for the study started last summer. Canopy Growth held information sessions at several long-term care facilities in Ontario, and residents from nearby facilities also came by bus to get more information."A lot of seniors struggle with three key areas: pain, mood and sleep," says David Greb, the director of continuing care with Canopy Growth."And the potential for cannabis to address a lot of the potential issues around aging is really the biggest population that could see benefit. But it's also a population that hasn't been exposed to a lot of education around cannabis."Greb tells the audience of curious and potential candidates about cannabidiol, the active ingredient in cannabis. He also brings up the story of an elderly woman who almost gave up playing the piano due to physical problems associated with aging."Unfortunately, she got osteoarthritis in her hands and she could no longer play piano. So she started using medical cannabis, and within about two months she was able to fully start playing again. And now she says 'I feel like a child again, I can play for hours on end.' I hear these stories over and over."That pianist is Neva Carmen, 90. She is a resident at a long-term care facility in Paris, Ont."It's been a standing joke in my family. My grandson just thinks it's wonderful: 'I have to tell my friends my 90-year-old grandmother is taking marijuana,'" Carmen laughs.Carmen says she was angry and frustrated when she would sit at the piano and the pain from her arthritis would prevent her from playing.Within six weeks on the cannabidiol treatment, she says she could feel a difference and her pain was subsiding. Now she plays regularly again for her fellow residents.Carmen says she's much happier now that the swelling in her hands is down, and she can go back to doing what she loves.Mixed resultsHowever, not everyone has had success with the treatment.Dr. Rhonda Collins works for Revera Homes, a network of seniors residences across Canada. She is helping identify people suitable for the trial, and making sure the residents and their families are well educated on the topic so that they can provide informed consent.She says so far the results of the trial have been mixed."In my practice I've seen people have amazing responses to cannabis. I've seen people have zero response. And I also have seen people have negative responses," Dr. Collins says."So that's why it's so important to me that rather than have a few scattered stories from across different sites, we have some rather robust evidence. Like any other drug that we use, any medication that we use — Tylenol, Ibuprofen, you name it — what works for you may not work for me."Dr. Collins says she believes the study is exciting, knowing there is a possibility something could improve a resident's quality of life. But she notes that we still need good evidence about both the effects and how safe cannabidiol is.Dr.  Mark Ware is the chief medical officer at Canopy Growth, and he is at the helm of this study, one of many involving medicinal cannabis. He says just like any other medicine, there are several considerations that seniors should keep in mind."They're often on other medications, and so the interaction between cannabinoid molecules and their existing medicines is a very important thing to consider. And we metabolize drugs differently, so the dosing may not be the same for an elderly person as it is for somebody who is in their 30s or 40s." Ware says the goal of the study is to offer an improved quality of life, but also to gather data on the effects of cannabidiol on the range of factors that affect our aging population. Pain management, agitation with dementia, and ability to sleep are all being looked at."We know that cannabinoids, at different times during the day, work on some of those factors. So if we combine those things together, if we measure those outcomes, does it lead to an improvement in their overall quality of life?," says Ware.The research will also set the groundwork for clinical trials to help establish best practices for using medical marijuana in the senior population.As for Mike Walker, he ultimately just wants his wife, Karen, to feel better."If I can't fix her, at least give her a better quality of life. If she can relax … it's all you can hope for with this disease. If I can get that, then that's closer than what we had last month."

  • Malaysia to choose 5G partners based on own security standards
    News
    Reuters

    Malaysia to choose 5G partners based on own security standards

    Malaysia's own security standards will dictate which companies take part in its planned 5G rollout this year, its communications minister told Reuters on Monday, as the United States pushes countries to exclude China's Huawei [HWT.UL]. Huawei, the world's largest telecommunications equipment maker, has been at the center of a U.S.-led campaign to clamp down on the use of Chinese technology in the development of the next-generation telecommunications platform because of concerns the equipment could be used by Beijing for spying. The United States placed Huawei on a trade blacklist in May, and in February U.S. prosecutors accused it of stealing trade secrets and helping Iran to track protesters.

  • Renegade maples, unpopular poplars and other troublesome trees
    News
    CBC

    Renegade maples, unpopular poplars and other troublesome trees

    Ottawa has a vibrant urban canopy, but sometimes our trees don't act the way we expect them to. "Trees aren't just pretty objects that we put up," said Joanna Dean, an environmental historian at Carleton University, ahead of a talk last week."They have a life of their own, they move, they change, they grow."As Ottawa started to urbanize, Dean told CBC Radio's Ottawa Morning, the city made an effort to bring in more trees that would provide shade and cooler air. Some of them, however, ended up on Ottawa's bad side. The renegade maple Dean told Ottawa Morning about three trees that have caused trouble, the first being the Manitoba maple.It was widely planted on city streets during the late 1800s and early 1900s, she said, because it grew quickly and provided good shade. But then it was banned — in part because heavy snow or windy weather would cause the branches of the "brittle tree" to snap off."They've got some very bad habits," Dean said. "They break." When it became evident that the maples were creating more trouble than they were worth, the city tried to get them off the streets. But the Manitoba maple wouldn't go easily. They would spring up all over the place, Dean said, and one of the locations they flourished was Parliament Hill. A study in the 1980s revealed that the Manitoba maple was crowding out all the other trees on the slopes behind Parliament. "These were weed trees ... these were runaways, they were escapees," she said.Though the tree is no longer banned, Dean said, it's certainly not one the city encourages planting. Centennial crabapples Another tree that's been discouraged in the city is the ornamental crabapple tree.It was popular in the 1960s, said Dean, when Canada's Centennial Commission wanted the bright pink trees everywhere. The city even gave 1,800 free trees to residents to plant on their property, and the National Capital Commission planted them alongside roads."But they turned out to be a problematic tree," Dean said. "In the fall, we have nothing but crabapples underfoot — and [that brings] wasps." The two varieties that were so strongly promoted by the Centennial Commission are now discouraged from being planted, she added, because they're very prone to disease. An unpopular poplarA third tree that caused tensions in the city is the Lombardy poplar.It was brought over from Italy, and given its thick canopy, it was used to line Central Park in the Glebe. "They made a lovely cloistered park," Dean said. "You couldn't see any of the houses. It felt like you were out of the city."But it you lived next to the park, the trees also hid your entire view. There was one resident, Dean said, who was particularly vocal about the Lombardy poplar that stood between the park and her property — so vocal, in fact, that the tree was eventually removed. A 'vibrant urban forest'Looking at the history of Ottawa's troublesome trees has implications, Dean said, for how we currently think about our urban canopy.She said it's important that we learn to live alongside trees, and also understand legitimate concerns that people have about some of them.A lot of trees get removed, she said, because they're in someone's way. "Until we realize how to work better with trees," Dean said, "we're not going to be very successful in creating a strong and vibrant urban forest."

  • Health professionals hope a giant scavenger hunt to locate GTA defibrillators saves lives
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    CBC

    Health professionals hope a giant scavenger hunt to locate GTA defibrillators saves lives

    Gregg Lowe was a healthy 28-year-old when he finished Toronto's Scotiabank Marathon in 2016 and suddenly collapsed."I had cardiac arrest," Lowe says. Now 32 and working as an actor, Lowe is thankful Toronto paramedics saw it happen and got to him right away. "I needed the use of an external defibrillator, which basically saved my life — it brought me back." Healthcare professionals never determined exactly why it happened, so Lowe is still regularly tested at St. Michael's Hospital and lives with an implantable cardioverter defibrillator to monitor his heart."So if my heart stopped for any reason it would restart it," he explains.That experience inspired Lowe to get behind the GTA Heart Map Challenge — a big scavenger hunt that asks the public to help locate a large portion of Toronto's estimated 20,000 automated external defibrillators (AEDs), and log them online to assist EMS workers.What's in it for the participants is cash — $5,000 for first place, $3,000 for second place and $2,000 for third place.According to health researchers leading the campaign, only around 1,500 AEDs are registered and there are approximately 7,000 Ontarians every year who have sudden cardiac arrest. Lowe says after his scary experience he has a whole new perspective on this piece of technology."Other than seeing them in movies or hospital dramas or things like that, it's one of those things where you think, 'Oh, they exist,' but it's separate from you," he said."You never think you're going to need something like that."Helping healthcare professionals save livesKatherine Allen, a research associate at St. Michael's Hospital, has focused on sudden cardiac arrest in young people for almost 15 years."A lot of what we've been doing with The Heart Map Challenge and other initiatives is trying to figure out ways in the community to help improve the survival rate," Allen said. And for that to happen, 911 dispatch needs to know where AEDs are located."That's a huge problem because if people don't know where these AEDs are, how are they supposed to use them to save a life?" she said.Allen says the lack of registered AEDs is likely a result of people not knowing the devices are supposed to be registered with their local EMS agency. She says if someone goes into cardiac arrest, the chances of survival are only around 10 per cent, but if there is an AED nearby and somebody is able to use it on the person within the first few minutes, their chances of survival can climb to over 50 per cent."We would love if we could find thousands of these AEDs because then it means that more lives can be saved," she said. "It would be amazing."How it worksFor the month of March, people can register individually or as a team, and then download the PulsePoint AED app.There, the participants can upload a photo of the AED they found and a detailed description of where it is."It's not enough to say it's in the Toronto Eaton Centre, it needs to be detailed," Allen explained. Allen hopes in addition to locating thousands of AEDs, people also take the time to learn a bit more about them."Anyone can use it — all you need to do is grab it and turn it on and it will tell you step by step exactly what you need to do," she said.The campaign also has the support of Mayor John Tory, who says the challenge "is a great way for members of the public to help a great cause while having fun."By raising awareness around the importance of AEDs and their locations, we can better equip bystanders to save lives if they witness a  cardiac arrest," a statement from Tory says.As for Lowe, he's been in good health since his cardiac arrest and just finished filming Jupiter's Legacy — a Netflix series shot in Toronto where he plays a super hero. He hopes his experience inspires others. "I want to help raise awareness for this life saving piece of technology, which is so accessible and could help so many people if only people knew where they were and that they're not incredibly difficult to operate," he said."Without it, I wouldn't be here."

  • Saskatchewan boy, philanthropist, international art dealer: Meet Frederick Mulder
    News
    CBC

    Saskatchewan boy, philanthropist, international art dealer: Meet Frederick Mulder

    Like many who grew up in rural Saskatchewan during the 1950s, Frederick Mulder curled, played hockey and golfed in people's backyards. Looking back now on his childhood in the tiny town of Eston, there was just one indication of the unconventional career he had waiting. "My ex-wife used to say, 'You used to go door to door selling Christmas cards, now you just go city to city selling prints.'" Not just any prints but Picassos, Munches and Matisses.Mulder, 76, is one of the world's foremost experts in the field of 19th- and 20th-century European prints. He has sold art to private dealers and museums around the world. As he walks around the Picasso and Paper exhibit at the Royal Academy of Arts in London, his faint British accent is a reminder that the man has been in England now for over 50 years. "This is it. This is the one we sold," said Mulder. "This is a linocut from 1962 of Jacqueline, his wife."Mulder graduated from the University of Saskatchewan with a BA in English then attended Brown University in Rhode Island on a scholarship but made a last-minute switch to philosophy. His thesis adviser suggested he write his dissertation at Oxford or Cambridge. "I thought that was a lovely idea," Mulder says with a smile.Borrowing to buy PicassosWith the help of a generous Canada Council fellowship, Mulder hopped on a plane bound for England with a book about investments. The last chapter focused on a man who collected the etchings of 17th-century master Rembrandt van Rijn. Upon arriving, Mulder attended an auction containing one of the artist's prints. With little experience in purchasing art, he picked up the phone to seek advice — and ended up dialling the famous Sotheby's auction house. "I treated London just like it was, as if it was this small town, really. I thought I could call anybody up or go and see anyone."Mulder bought his first Rembrandt print in 1966 and was instantly hooked.He later sold it and used some of the money to go to Paris. It was there he met up with a man named Paul Proute whose stock included Picassos, including an impression of The Circus — the only Picasso Mulder owned."I said to him, well, I'd like to buy yours. And he said, 'I have a whole bunch of them if, you know, if you want more than one.'"Mulder bought eight. But had to borrow the money to do it. "I came back, told my bank that I had done this and said, 'I hear you have these things called overdrafts,'" he says with a laugh. "The bank manager was amused. I don't think he'd ever had a graduate student asking if he could, you know, borrow money to buy some Picassos." Within two weeks, he says, he'd sold every Picasso for double what he'd paid. It was the start of a formula that propelled Mulder's career forward: buy strategically, sell honestly, profit slowly. Eventually, the art would go for as much as $3 million. Despite his success, Mulder never aspired to own a yacht or go on expensive vacations. In fact, his 20-year-old Volkswagen was stolen a few years ago so now he rides a bicycle or uses Uber to get around.Instead, Mulder uses that money to give back. Passionate philanthropist"Fred's passions go far beyond the art world, and I would divide them into two that are connected at the hip," said University of Saskatchewan president Peter Stoicheff, who has known Mulder for eight years. "One is philanthropy ... and the other is ...  in environmental causes."Mulder estimates, and media reports confirm, he has so far donated around 10 million pounds (more than $17 million Cdn) to various causes. He says the environment is definitely a focus."I think that what we're doing now is we're stealing the future from our children. We don't have the right to use resources that we should be leaving for you to use," said Mulder. "He's very humble," said Stoicheff. "It's difficult to say exactly where that comes from, but part of it is that he grew up in small-town Saskatchewan."There are now Picasso works splashed across the Prairies — nearly all with ties to Mulder, and at least six of which he donated to the University of Saskatchewan (U of S). In 2012, Mulder sold what he calls "the most extensive collection of Picasso linocuts in the world" to Ellen Remai. She subsequently donated it to the Remai Modern, a Saskatoon art museum named after her, and that sparked a partnership between the museum and the U of S.The collection is valued at some $20 million.Back to his roots In May, Mulder will return to his home province for a Picasso symposium put on by the museum and the U of S, which in 2017 honoured Mulder for his "lifelong contributions in the art world and his passion for philanthropy.""It'll be nice to go back," said Mulder. "I've often thought if I had come from the same background in the U.K. that I came from in Saskatchewan, which is a very remote farming town, I probably would have had the wrong accent, the wrong set of ideas." Asked what his younger self would think upon hearing about the life he has lived, Mulder says with a laugh, "I would have thought that they must be talking about somebody else." There was no art in Eston, Sask., when Mulder grew up. There is now, however, one Picasso linocut, donated by Mulder,  that hangs in the local museum, a testament to where the great art dealer is from, where he went and the endless possibilities of where anyone can go.  "These things happen. They could so easily not have happened," said Mulder, "and if you take the opportunity that they provide, you know, they kind of transform your life."

  • Exo's Candiac line trains disrupted again as protest drags into 2nd week
    News
    CBC

    Exo's Candiac line trains disrupted again as protest drags into 2nd week

    Commuter trains along Exo's Candiac line on Montreal's South Shore continue to be disrupted Monday due to the presence of protestors close to the Canadian Pacific (CP) tracks.Mohawks from Kahnawake have been blocking the tracks that run through their territory in a show of solidarity with protesters who are preventing access to a pipeline construction site on traditional Wet'suwet'en land in northern British Columbia.Exo put out a release Sunday saying that coach buses were being organized to get commuters from the South Shore stations to downtown Montreal.Protests sprang up across the country after the RCMP began raiding blockades set up by Wet'suwet'en hereditary chiefs.The police are enforcing a B.C. Supreme Court injunction to allow Coastal GasLink workers to continue construction on the pipeline.The $6-billion, 670-kilometre Coastal GasLink pipeline is a key component of a $40-billion project announced by the federal and provincial governments last fall.'Modest progress' madeAnother blockade in Tyendinaga Mohawk territory near Belleville, Ont., has stopped Via Rail service between Montreal and Toronto.Over the weekend, Federal Minister of Indigenous Services and Ville-Marie—Le Sud-Ouest—Île-des-Sœurs MP Marc Miller met with Tyendinaga protesters.He said "modest progress" had been made in talks to end the blockade.Late Sunday, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau cancelled a planned trip to Barbados in order to meet with an Incident Response Group on Monday.

  • Delicious recipes: Thai spicy salmon sashimi salad
    Rumble

    Delicious recipes: Thai spicy salmon sashimi salad

    Watch Rose create this delicious spicy Thai Spicy Salmon Sashimi Salad. Yum!

  • 'I thought I was going to die': Canadian farmers open up about struggles with mental health
    News
    CBC

    'I thought I was going to die': Canadian farmers open up about struggles with mental health

    Ask Sean Stanford what it's like to be a farmer in southern Alberta during the winter, and one of the first things he talks about is his mental health. "It's when a lot of thoughts go sideways in your head, it seems like to me," he says. Stanford, 35, runs a grain farm near the town of McGrath, south of Lethbridge. "Winter is definitely tough, especially out here in the prairies, because there's snow and cold and not a lot of people around," he says.Stanford is a third-generation farmer — his parents and grandparents, on both sides of the family, work the land within 20 kilometres of where he lives today. "It's kind of a family heritage thing for all of us to be farmers," he says. Still, despite the inevitability of following in the family footsteps, there's something unique about Stanford. He's one of the first farmers in Canada to speak publicly about his mental health struggles."If I hadn't gotten help, I don't know if I would be here today, honestly," he says. "I am not saying I am a suicidal person necessarily, but you start to get to some dark places when you don't know what's going on inside of yourself."Stanford is by no means alone. A 2016 study from the University of Guelph polled 1,100 Canadian farmers across the country and found that roughly 45 per cent had high levels of stress, and 35 per cent met the criteria for depression — numbers that are much higher than the general population. 'It's a high-dollar risk game'One of the primary mental health stress factors that comes with farming is financial. In order to purchase the land and equipment they need, many farmers have to juggle high levels of debt. Meanwhile, their payoff depends on the weather. "You try to do everything right and you have no idea what's gonna happen," Stanford says. "Something is going to fall out of the sky — if it's rain it'll be good, if it's hail it could be bad. It's a high-dollar risk game."It's like going to Vegas and betting thousands per roll. You never know what the outcome is gonna be."A few years ago that unpredictability hit Stanford hard. His crops weren't very good, the bills were piling up and he had more work than he could handle. Stanford says he tried to keep going, but in the end he broke down. "I was in bed and it felt like a crushing weight on my chest and my arm. It felt like every sign of a heart attack that I have ever read before," he says. "I thought I was going to die. I thought: 'my family is gonna be without me and they are gonna be in even worse shape.' Until I finally got the answer of what was wrong it was petrifying."When a doctor said what Stanford believed was a heart attack was in fact anxiety, it created another problem. Farmers can talk about a heart attack, but to admit that you suffer from anxiety is taboo, Stanford explains. "Farmers are supposed to be the salt of the earth, strong people who don't need help from anybody. They are supposed to carry on no matter what happens to them," he says. "But I have come to realize that asking for help is not a bad thing."Farmers need to 'do more'When Stanford reached out online for help he found Leslie Kelly, who runs a grain farm near Saskatoon with her husband Matt. Kelly had recently co-founded the first Canadian mental health organization aimed specifically at farmers, called Do More Agriculture. "In agriculture we always hear about the latest advances in technology and innovation, and we forgot about our people," Kelly says.While Kelly sensed that many farmers struggled with their mental health, it wasn't until she rented a hall in Edmonton and invited people to come and talk about it that she understood the full extent of the problem.  "There were about 400 seats in that room and I thought, 'oh if a dozen people come that will be so great.' And when we opened the doors, the farmers they flooded in, and you could not find an empty chair in that room," Kelly says. "People were even sitting in the aisle and standing along the back. We asked the question if you knew someone who has died by suicide — a loved one, a community member, a fellow farmer — and almost that whole entire room stood up. And I cried almost that whole panel."Then when the event was over, Kelly met someone who showed her just how much she could help."There was a farmer who was directly across from me, he was standing at the back and he had his hat down, and he cried the whole time," she says."He came up to us when everybody had left and he said, 'I'd like to thank you.' We said why? He said 'you just saved my life. I am going to go home and talk to my wife.'"I cried, knowing that we should've been talking about this years ago."'He thought he was dying'The reason that story hits home for Kelly is the same reason she started working to help farmers with their mental health in the first place. Her husband Matt had his own mental health breakdown a few years ago during a particularly tough harvest. "Everything was starting to compound — my life, the farm, everything was just starting to balloon. And I was just going around and around in a circle," Matt Kelly remembers. "I started to have panic attacks at night. I would think about one thing. One thing would turn into 10. Ten things would turn into 100, would turn into 1,000 and so on."Leslie Kelly explains that watching her husband's panic attacks was the hardest thing she's ever done. "He thought he was dying. He would sweat and not be able to breathe, and I would have to hold onto him so tight for him to focus on my breathing to get it to slow down," she says."I remember having to take his clothes off because he was sweating so much, and laying him down on the cool floor to get him to cool off."Today, with Leslie's help, Matt is doing much better. And now the couple works together promoting mental health for farmers across the country.The Do More Foundation recently received non-profit status and launched a project where they fund mental health first aid training in a dozen rural communities across Canada.And last spring Leslie Kelly testified at a House of Commons standing committee looking into the mental health challenges facing Canadian farmers.A 'real farmer' would just suck it upSean Stanford tries to help other farmers too. He knows what it takes to get healthy, and shares his experience whenever he can."Most days I feel something, a little bit of stress of some kind, but I found a lot of mechanisms to help me with it," he says."I am on some medications that I take every day. It really helped level me out. Before, I would get home, have supper, go back to work. Now I stay and play with the kids, and have more quality time to help my brain decompress after a day of work."Stanford's journey hasn't been easy. The stigma around mental health still exists. He says he gets messages online telling him that a "real farmer" would just suck it up. But Stanford says he tried that, and the stakes are too high. "What I was doing wasn't working, something needed to change. I am glad getting help was what the change was, rather than abandoning the farm, abandoning my family, abandoning everything I've known," he says."It was the right choice to get help, so I can continue everything I have been working on my whole life rather than change directions and run away."WATCH | The National's feature on encouraging farmers to speak up about stress and depression:

  • 2nd story of babies switched at birth — same year, same Come By Chance hospital
    News
    CBC

    2nd story of babies switched at birth — same year, same Come By Chance hospital

    A Newfoundland couple has come forward with a second story about babies switched at birth at the Come By Chance hospital in the early 1960s.Their story has a happier ending than the case of Clarence Hynes and Craig Avery, but both cases raise questions about how hospitals identify babies to ensure they go home with their birth parents.The nose didn't look rightFifty-eight years ago, Muriel Stringer was a 19-year-old coming home in a taxi with a newborn baby, her husband and her mother.Three days earlier, on Aug. 8, 1962, Stringer had given birth to a baby boy, named Kent.It was a long taxi ride, about 40 kilometres on dirt roads, from the Walwyn Cottage Hospital in Come By Chance to Hodge's Cove, on the east coast of Trinity Bay.They took a break partway home at a restaurant in Goobies. Muriel Stringer and her mom stayed in the car while her husband, Cecil, went inside. My baby had dark hair … and a nose like me. The nose didn't look right to me. \- Muriel Stringer"Me and Mom were there talking and looking at the baby and I said, 'Mom, he don't look like my baby,'" Stringer told CBC News."My baby had dark hair, a lot of dark hair, and a nose like me. The nose didn't look right to me. And my mother said, 'Oh, that's probably because of the bonnet and the clothes on him.' So anyway, we come on home."The arm bandStringer said her mother, Lilian Peddle, changed her mind when they undressed the baby."When she took the sweater off, she said, 'Oh my, it's not your baby.' There was a band on his arm and it was written, 'Baby Boy Adams.' He was only a day old, this baby. Mine was three days old," said Stringer.They didn't have a phone so Cecil Stringer went to the Hodge's Cove Post Office."I phoned the hospital and the nurse answered. I told her what happened and first thing she said was, 'How come you didn't know your own baby?'" said Stringer. "But she checked and told me baby Stringer was there."He called another taxi and left with Muriel's mother to bring the baby back to Come By Chance and pick up Kent."It was embarrassing," he said.For Muriel Stringer it was the beginning of a long, anxious wait."Oh, I was frightened to death. I was thinking, 'What if he didn't have his band on his arm?' It scared me," she said.Cecil Stringer doesn't remember exactly what happened when he got to the hospital, but Muriel Stringer says at the time he told her the other baby's mother was on the steps of the hospital waiting when he got there."This lady had only had her baby that day. So she was frightened to death. You know, anything could have happened to a newborn baby."Wrong cribAt the hospital, a nurse said someone at the hospital had put the baby in the wrong crib, and when the Stringers were leaving, the nurse had just looked at the name on the crib."That was their explanation," said Cecil Stringer. "I don't know for sure if that's what happened."Cecil and Muriel's mother collected Kent and headed home."Oh my, oh my, I was happy. Such a sweet boy. He still is," said Muriel.The couple say they weren't angry about the switch — they say they were treated well at the Walwyn Hospital — but were grateful they got their baby back the same day.The Stringers had five more children. One was born at home when a powerful winter storm closed the road out of Hodge's Cove. Four others were born, like Kent, in Come By Chance.Not the only babies switched at Come By ChanceWhat's striking about the Stringer's story is that it's not unique.The Stringer case happened in August, just months before Craig Avery and Clarence Hynes, born in the same hospital, were switched and sent home with the wrong families in December 1962.And while the Stringers' switch was rectified quickly and happily, the story of Avery and Hynes is still playing out. They didn't learn about their mix-up until it was confirmed by DNA tests last year, and there has been no happy ending for them. How many times did this sort of thing happen? \- Craig AveryThey never met their birth parents, who died years ago. The two men, now in their mid-50s, say they're still struggling with the fallout of everything they thought they knew about their families being turned upside down.Last year, Hynes and Avery launched lawsuits claiming negligence and suing Eastern Health for damages.Avery says the Stringers' story leaves him with more questions."How many times did this sort of thing happen?" he asked.Who's responsible?In a statement of defence filed Feb. 11, Eastern Health says it's not responsible for what happened at the Come By Chance Cottage Hospital more than half a century ago."Neither Eastern Health nor any authority it replaced … ever assumed or was ever vested with the assets, liabilities rights or obligations of the Come By Chance cottage hospital," says the statement.The health authority has asked for the action to be dismissed, with costs.As for the Stringers, the health authority sent CBC News the following statement:"Eastern Health has not been advised of another situation whereby a family went home from a cottage hospital with the wrong baby."Modern patient identificationThe Walwyn Cottage Hospital in Come By Chance closed in 1986. Babies are now born at facilities operated by the province's four regional health authorities. Eastern Health says it takes many steps to make sure babies go home with their birth families."Eastern Health has a number of stringent measures in place to ensure positive patient identification, including newborn babies," it told CBC in its statement.Among those measures, according to the statement: * The infant is kept in the same room with the mother during the hospital stay and limits the number of times an infant is away from its mother. * When a mother and her infant must be separated — such as during a test or other procedure where the parent is not able to accompany the child — identification bands are checked when the infant is returned to the mother. * Upon discharge, all identification bracelets are again verified by a nurse, and the mother signs documentation to confirm the bracelet information is correct and the infant is her own.Read more from CBC Newfoundland and Labrador

  • What you should know about this week's teacher strikes
    News
    CBC

    What you should know about this week's teacher strikes

    The basics: * No school Monday for Family Day. * No school Friday for most elementary and high school students across the province. * At the moment, there are no strikes planned for Tuesday, Wednesday or Thursday.Over two million students will be out of class this Friday as Ontario's four largest teacher unions plan to hold a joint one-day strike if there is no progress in contract talks with the provincial government.The unions that will participate in Friday's strike are the Elementary Teachers' Federation of Ontario (ETFO), the Ontario Secondary School Teachers' Federation (OSSTF), the Ontario English Catholic Teachers' Association (OECTA) and the Association des enseignantes et des enseignants franco-ontariens (AEFO).Classes are also cancelled on Monday for Family Day. At the moment, no strikes have been announced for Tuesday through Thursday.Negotiations at a standstillContract negotiations between the Progressive Conservative government and the education unions have largely stalled with several major issues unresolved, including the role of seniority in hiring practices, class sizes, funding for students with special education needs and mandatory e-learning.The unions are also asking for around two per cent in annual salary increases, while the government won't budge beyond offering one per cent.It passed legislation last year capping wage hikes for all public sector workers at one per cent for three years. The teachers' unions and several others are fighting the law in court, arguing it infringes on collective bargaining rights.See below for a list of eastern Ontario school closures for the upcoming week. Make sure to visit your school board's website for the most up-to-date information.Monday Feb. 17Schools will be closed for Family Day.Friday Feb. 21Ottawa-Carleton District School BoardAll OCDSB schools will be closed.Extended Day programs and all Community Use of School permits will also be cancelled.Ottawa Catholic School BoardAll OCSB schools will be closed, unless an agreement is reached between the province and OECTA. All bus and van transportation will also be cancelled.Before- and after-school programs will be cancelled for the day, although all Ottawa Catholic Child Care Corporation Toddler and Preschool programs and all EarlyOn Centres will be open and will operate according to their regular hours.Community Use of Schools programming is not affected by the one-day provincial strike.  Catholic District School Board of Eastern Ontario All CDSBEO elementary and secondary schools will be closed to students.Parents who have children that attend child care or before- and after-school care programs in CDSBEO facilities should contact their individual provider for details during the strike.Upper Canada District School BoardAll UCDSB students will have the day off as schools are closed. Parents and guardians whose children attend a child-care facility at a UCDSB school should contact their child-care provider with any questions.Renfrew County District School BoardAll elementary and secondary schools will be closed.Child-care facilities may continue to operate. Parents and guardians should contact their operator to confirm whether they will remain open and if they'll have additional child-care spaces during strike days. Community-use bookings will continue as usual.Limestone District School BoardAll elementary and secondary schools will be closed, and students in Grades 9 to 12 should not attend school. This includes students in co-op and those attending dual credit and programs at St. Lawrence College.Literacy and Basic Skills, Adult ESL and Teacher Assisted Self-Study programs will also not run.Extra-curricular activities, field trips and all sports sanctioned by the Kingston Area Secondary Schools Athletic Association will be cancelled.Hastings-Prince Edward District School Board Classes are cancelled for all students.Algonquin and Lakeshore Catholic District School Board All ALCDSB schools will be closed to students.Conseil des écoles publiques de l'Est de l'OntarioClasses and school transportation will be cancelled. Before- and after-school programs for toddlers, preschoolers and children ages four to 12 will not operate.For daycare services operated by a third party, parents and guardians should contact the child-care service to check if they will remain open. Programs for infants, toddlers and preschoolers offered by third-party partners will be open.Conseil des écoles catholiques du Centre-Est All classes will be cancelled.Daycare centres for preschool children will remain open, except for l'Académie catholique Notre-Dame and l'École élémentaire catholique L'Envol, both of which will be closed.Parents of school-aged children who require child care should contact their provider to learn if those centres will remain open.All EarlyON Centres will be closed with the exception of: * l'École élémentaire catholique Jean-Robert-Gauthier. * l'École élémentaire catholique Des Voyageurs. * l'École secondaire catholique Béatrice-Desloges. * le Centre scolaire catholique Jeanne-Lajoie.

  • More than a fashion statement, the Métis sash was like 'Batman's utility belt'
    News
    CBC

    More than a fashion statement, the Métis sash was like 'Batman's utility belt'

    When it comes to Métis culture and symbols, there are few things that stand out quite like the sash. But what is the history behind it? And what is its significance to Métis people today?CBC Indigenous met up with a couple of Métis historians to find out."Sashes to me, tell stories… whether it's done on a loom.. or finger weaving, to me they're always telling a story," said Teresa Byrnes.Byrnes is the Métis cultural and tour co-ordinator at the Manitoba Métis Federation's Louis Riel Institute.She said that wearing a sash today shows Métis pride in their heritage."I am a proud Métis woman and to wear this sash is not just for Festival de Voyageur, but for different events. To me, it's honouring my nation and being proud of who we are instead of hiding," said Byrnes.Sashes used for practical purposesAlthough the sash is not exclusive to Métis people, the Metis adopted the usage of the L'Assomption sash, which was named after the Quebec town where they were produced.According to Byrnes, the sash wasn't used just for fashion or to hold a person's pants up.Back in the early days of the Métis, they were used for many day to day activities on the prairies."When I do my teachings on a sash, I explain that it's almost like a Batman utility belt," said Byrnes."Back then they would wear it around their stomachs because most men died of hernias, so it became a weight belt." She said that sashes were also used as tourniquets, for sewing, storing pemmican and also for holding chest keys."Voyageurs going out for months at a time would have their big trunk keys on their sashes almost like a key chain," said Byrnes.According to Byrnes, the colours of the sashes also represented a person's employer affiliations during the fur trade."When you worked for the Hudson's Bay Company, you received a red sash. If you worked for the Northwest Company, you received a blue sash," said Byrnes.Blending of coloursByrnes said the Métis eventually blended the two colours and created their own sashes."With the Métis, they were very smart. They knew their trades. And so for them to create coloured sashes and to become free men… that was big back then."Over the years, Byrnes has gathered a personal collection of sashes, both buying them and making them herself. She learned how to use an ankle loom to create custom sashes and has been making them for organizations like the University of Winnipeg and University of Manitoba and also makes them for individuals.When asked to make them, she asks people about their life experiences and what their interests and favourite colours are.Her own personal favourite? The one she made for her spouse.It incorporates the Peguis First Nation flag and also the Two Row Wampum belt to honour his Mohawk heritageRiel's sash at the St. Boniface MuseumThe St. Boniface Museum is the oldest building in Winnipeg and is home to many historical Métis artifacts, such as the sashes of prominent Métis leaders including Louis Riel.Since 2008, the province of Manitoba has celebrated Louis Riel Day on the third Monday of February. Earlier this week, it was announced that the admission to the St. Boniface Museum would be open to the public for free, as part of the Manitoba 150 celebrations.For museum director Vania Gagnon, Louis Riel Day is an opportunity to celebrate not only Riel, but also the community of Métis people that surrounded the leader."[Riel] didn't operate in a vacuum. He had colleagues, he had friends, cousins, alliances and so it's really that community that was here, that really vibrant cultural community that we know as the Métis," said Gagnon.The MMF will be partnering with the St. Boniface Museum to host their annual Louis Riel Day event on Monday at the museum from noon till 4 p.m.

  • Virus deals new blow to Cambodian city bound to China
    News
    Reuters

    Virus deals new blow to Cambodian city bound to China

    An influx of Chinese that some Cambodians resented for bringing noise, dust and chaos to the port of Sihanoukville, is the cause of more pain now that it has gone into reverse. The new coronavirus has meant yet another setback for Sihanoukville after the government last year banned the online gambling that had helped fuel the spectacular growth of a once listless city into a major Chinese population center. "Now things are calm and in order, unlike before, but it is bad for businesses like mine," said tuk-tuk driver Kwan Samhay, 55, as he cruised the streets looking for passengers.

  • He started a GoFundMe campaign to bring his father's body back from Cuba. Then the U.S. froze the funds
    News
    CBC

    He started a GoFundMe campaign to bring his father's body back from Cuba. Then the U.S. froze the funds

    When David Carbery's father, Bill, died unexpectedly while travelling Cuba, he knew he had to find a way to get his body back to B.C.Carbery set up an online fundraiser through GoFundMe so family and friends could donate money to help with the repatriation costs.But a week into the fundraiser, Carbery could tell something was off, as his account was flagged for a possible violation of U.S.-Cuban sanction regulations.Now, almost a year later, Carbery says he has been sent on a wild goose chase with GoFundMe and its online payment processor, WePay, while the donations remain frozen by the U.S. Treasury Department's Office of Foreign Assets Control (OFAC)."It was devastating to me," says Carbery referring to his experience dealing with GoFundMe, while also grieving the sudden loss of his father."It's a roller coaster of emotions, everything from anger to embarrassment."Carbery says he hasn't been able to reach out to his donors — who have yet to be refunded — to inform them of what happened because his GoFundMe account is locked and donor history is only available on the online platform.The fundraiser had earned just under $2,000 by the time it was blocked."It's not a huge amount. But still, that's other people's money. It's my friends and family," he says. Throughout the ordeal, Carbery says he was never once able to speak with someone at GoFundMe or WePay over the phone because they only correspond by email.Flagged for connection to CubaIn a written statement on Monday, a GoFundMe spokesperson told CBC that the decision to freeze the funds was made by WePay."After our payment processor reviewed the campaign, they determined that it was necessary to block the funds pending receipt of a specific licence from the treasury that authorizes this activity," the statement said.WePay and the U.S. Treasury have yet to respond to CBC's requests for comment. Carbery set up his online donation account GoFundMe on March 20, 2019.  At first, everything was running smoothly as loved ones began donating money to help bring his father home.The Canadian consulate estimated it would cost more than $6,000 for cremation and transportation fees to Ontario, as well as a $60-per-day storage fee for holding the body in Cuba.As costs rose, Carbery and his family were eager to access the donations quickly, but GoFundMe contacted him on March 25 with concerns that the funds could be going to a sanctioned country.WePay required more information about who would receive the funds and a description of how the donations would be distributed, he was told by GoFundMe.Over the next few weeks, Carbery provided GoFundMe with the answers to all of their questions.And so he waited, all while the repatriations costs kept rising, forcing Carbery to take out a loan to bring his father back, with the hopes of then using the donations against that loan.Frustrated, Carbery asked for the funds to simply be refunded to the donors, but GoFundMe said that wasn't possible while the information was being reviewed by WePay.More than a month after he started the campaign — and after multiple follow-ups about how long it was taking — his account was cancelled."WePay blocked and reported the funds in this account to the U.S. Treasury Department's Office of Foreign Assets Control as a potential violation of Cuba Sanctions Regulations," an email from GoFundMe said."As a U.S. company, we are prohibited from engaging in most Cuba-related transactions, unless such transactions are authorized by OFAC. We are also prohibited from facilitating a Cuba-related transaction by a non-U.S. individual."Account reported to U.S. TreasuryNow, instead of simply refunding the donations, Carbery was told WePay wouldn't release the funds until he obtained a campaign licence from the U.S. Treasury's OFAC.Carbery was provided with a phone number for OFAC as well as an online application.And so began his next unwanted adventure.Carbery says he contacted OFAC by phone multiple times and left them detailed messages requesting assistance. All of which went unreturned.He says he, his wife and his sister were all unable to complete the online application because it required information on the campaign that they no longer had access to because it was blocked by GoFundMe.Again, he pleaded with the fundraising platform for help."We are unable to provide any guidance or assistance in applying for a specific license from the U.S. Treasury Department," an email from the company says.Almost 1 year later, funds still frozenFlustered and still grieving, Carbery says he reached a boiling point, while the money sat frozen due to U.S.-Cuban political relations."I basically begged them to give the money back," he says."I want to make sure the people that were trying to donate to this cause are going to, at least, get their money back."After eight months of back-and-forth with GoFundme and WePay, Carbery sent his final pleading email in October 2019."I was broken and I just ended up walking away from it," he says.

  • News
    CBC

    TMR residents vote in favour of new $48.7M sports complex in referendum

    Town of Mount Royal residents voted in favour of a proposed $48.7-million sports and community complex in a referendum, Sunday evening.Touted as TMR's first municipal building to be constructed in a half century, the plan calls for three pools, a water slide, a double gymnasium, dance and art studios, an indoor track and even a weight room.39 per cent of eligible voters took part in the referendum Sunday, with 57.5 per cent voting in favour of the complex and 41.9 per cent voting against it. In November, 938 residents of the upscale Montreal suburb forced a referendum on the plan by signing a registry that required 931 signatures.Opponents of the project raised concerns that the complex was larger than necessary for the community's population of 21,000.The plan will also take over a local green space and result in higher property taxes for homeowners.Before polling closed Sunday evening, residents offered their thoughts on the plan.Dan Munteanu, who voted in favour, said that with a baby on the way, his family will make use of the new facility regularly."I think its important for the town to have an updated facility — something we can be proud of," he said.But Nora Taji, who voted against, said she's worried about the cost of the project ballooning."The burden is going to be on the citizens and we already pay pretty high taxes."Mayor Philippe Roy has been pushing for the plan since the beginning, saying that the current recreation centre and pool are in poor condition and not adapted for people with reduced mobility.The referendum question focused specifically on a bylaw that would see the town borrow $27.8 million for the construction of the complex.With surpluses allocated and a provincial subsidy secured, the requested financing came down to $20.3 million, the town said.TMR predicts the building's annual operating cost would be about $1.7 million.

  • News
    The Canadian Press

    Hawaii police say thieves took $1K worth of pungent fruit

    HONOLULU — Police in Hawaii are investigating the theft of fruit valued at about $1,000 including durian, which is known for its powerful odor.Two men entered a property in Hilo on the Big Island and removed 18 durian and other types of fruit on the night of Feb. 1, the Hawaii Police Department said.Authorities released a surveillance camera image of two suspects and asked the public for additional information that could lead to the capture of the fruit bandits.The tropical, spiky durian fruit resembles a small porcupine and typically weighs from 2 to 7 pounds (1 to 3 kilograms).Durian is known for a pale yellow flesh with a sweet taste but a smell that has been compared to mouldy cheese, rotten onions, dead fish and far worse.Durian is popular across Southeast Asia but also is commonly banned from hotel rooms and public transportation there.The smell of rotting durian in a cupboard was mistaken for a gas leak and prompted an evacuation of a library at the Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology in Australia in April 2018.The Associated Press

  • The 'Fox Fiver': Port Coquitlam wants Terry Fox to be the new face of the $5 bill
    News
    CBC

    The 'Fox Fiver': Port Coquitlam wants Terry Fox to be the new face of the $5 bill

    The City of Port Coquitlam is encouraging residents to nominate Terry Fox as the new face of the $5 bill.The city's website now features a link to a Bank of Canada voting page which asks people to nominate the next "bank NOTE-able Canadian.""This is Terry's town, this is where he grew up," said Coun. Steve Darling."We encourage all of our citizens to go online and nominate Terry for the $5 bill," he said.In January, the Bank of Canada announced it would let the public have a say about who would replace Sir Wilfred Laurier who has been the face of the $5 bill since 1972.Port Coquitlam Mayor Brad West has written letters to Stephen Poloz, governor of the Bank of Canada, and federal finance minister Bill Morneau in support of Terry Fox's nomination, according to Darling.Fox, considered a national hero, spent his formative years in Port Coquitlam.Terry's legacyIn 1980, the 21-year-old athlete — who had already lost a leg to cancer — started his ambitious Marathon of Hope to raise money and awareness for cancer research. He died before he could complete his journey, but in the process raised over $24 million. The foundation created in his name has raised hundreds of millions of dollars for cancer research in the four decades since Fox's death.Dave Teixeira, the organizer of the Terry Fox Hometown Run in Port Coquitlam wants to see Fox named in time to coincide with the 40th anniversary of his historic fundraising journey, September 20, 2020."The 'Fox Fiver' would be a great way to honour him," said Teixeira. "And also remind us that maybe it's time again for us to dip into our pockets to give a little bit more to help bring an end to cancer."Close to 300 Canadian's are in the running to be the face of the next $5 bill including: * Frederick Banting, the co-discoverer of insulin. * Billy Bishop, First World War flying ace. * John Candy, comedian. * Emily Carr, artist and writer. * Jane Constance Cook, First Nations activist."It's our turn to help the Terry Fox family foundation by getting him on the $5 bill," said Darling. "He deserves to be there."A short list will be developed from among the nominated candidates when the contest closes March 11. That list will be submitted to the minister of finance, who will make the final decision. The Bank of Canada said it expects the new $5 note to be in circulation "in a few years."

  • He's still standing: Elton John to finish Down Under tour
    News
    The Canadian Press

    He's still standing: Elton John to finish Down Under tour

    WELLINGTON, New Zealand — Elton John intends to play his remaining shows in New Zealand and Australia, his tour promoters said Monday, a day after illness caused the singer to lose his voice and cut short a performance.Video clips posted online by fans at Sunday night's performance showed John breaking down in tears as he told the cheering crowd he couldn't go on any longer. The 72-year-old singer said he had walking pneumonia and was assisted off stage.Tour promoters Chugg Entertainment said John was resting and doctors were confident he would recover. They said a concert planned for Tuesday in Auckland would be delayed until Wednesday on the advice of doctors.“Elton John was disappointed and deeply upset at having to end his Auckland concert early last night,” the promoters said in their statement.The concert was part of John's Farewell Yellow Brick Road tour. As well as the delayed performance on Wednesday, John is scheduled to play again in Auckland on Thursday and then seven performances in Australia before travelling to the U.S. and Canada.He thanked the concert attendees via an Instagram post and apologized for ending the show early.“I want to thank everyone who attended tonight’s gig in Auckland. I was diagnosed with walking pneumonia earlier today, but I was determined to give you the best show humanly possible,” John wrote. “I played and sang my heart out, until my voice could sing no more. I’m disappointed, deeply upset and sorry. I gave it all I had."New Zealand Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern said she watched the show and got to meet John for about five minutes before he started playing.“You could tell that he wasn't feeling well and he said he wasn't feeling well,” Ardern said. “So I think you could see that on the stage last night, which I think is just a credit to his commitment to his fans.”Ardern said the pair discussed politics and how her toddler daughter Neve loves to dance to his music. John has previously expressed his admiration for the New Zealand leader.The New Zealand Herald reported that John told the crowd he was ill but that he didn't want to miss the show. He slumped on a stool and required medical attention after performing "Someone Saved My Life Tonight," but recovered and continued to play, the newspaper reported. Later, as he he attempted to sing “Daniel,” he realized he had no voice left and was escorted off stage.John had just returned to New Zealand after performing at the Academy Awards in Los Angeles. He won an Oscar for best original song for his theme song for the movie “Rocketman.”According to the Mayo Clinic, walking pneumonia is an informal term for a milder form of pneumonia that isn't severe enough to require hospitalization or bed rest. It affects the respiratory tract and is most often caused by bacteria.The Associated Press

  • UK digital bank Monzo plans to hire 500 and relaunch paid accounts
    News
    Reuters

    UK digital bank Monzo plans to hire 500 and relaunch paid accounts

    Fast-growing British digital bank Monzo plans to hire up to 500 people and forecasts it will get 5.5 million users this year, as it prepares to have another crack at charging some customers to turn a profit. Launched in 2015, Monzo has attracted 3.8 million customers in Britain with its bright coral card and spend-tracking data. Some younger customers in particular have become fierce advocates, with the digital bank ranked as the most likely brand in Britain to be recommended to a friend in a YouGov survey in November.

  • As Canadians return home from Westerdam cruise, health officials urge them to self-isolate
    News
    CBC

    As Canadians return home from Westerdam cruise, health officials urge them to self-isolate

    Two Canadians who were aboard a cruise ship that was refused entry to several countries before docking in Cambodia last week received an unusual greeting when they returned to Canada Sunday: border agents were waiting at their gate, requesting they don masks.Stephen Hansen and his wife were among 271 Canadians who had been stuck aboard the Westerdam cruise ship that eventually docked in Cambodia on Friday, allowing passengers to disembark.But not long after, an 83-year old American passenger tested positive for COVID-19, the coronavirus, raising concerns that other passengers could have been infected. Initially, Holland America, which operates the cruise, said there was no one was sick on its ship.At Vancouver International Airport, the Hansens, of Surrey, B.C., were asked to wear masks, but weren't told to isolate themselves."We were asked a few questions and filled out an immigration form, and they very nicely helped us bypass the usual lineups and let us out the door," Hansen said.'We're feeling fine'Now, Canadian health officials are asking passengers who were on the Westerdam and who are returning to Canada to isolate themselves for 14 days after they return, and to report to local public health authorities within 24 hours to be monitored for symptoms of the COVID‑19In a statement Sunday, Tammy Jarbeau, a spokesperson for the Public Health Agency of Canada said Westerdam passengers will undergo further examination and screening.The statement said Canadian passengers from the MS Westerdam were identified so that they would be screened when they returned to Canada. The Canadian passengers will be asked to inform authorities where they will be, so public health authorities can follow up.The statement said some travellers returned before these measures were put in place. Health officials and the Canada Border Services Agency are working together to identify those individuals who will be contacted, the statement said.Cruise didn't go as plannedThe Westerdam cruise ship left Hong Kong on February 1, with several stops planned before ending in Japan. But the ship was turned away by five different countries over fears of the coronavirus.It wasn't the vacation Hansen was expecting. "It was supposed to be a 30-day bucket list tour," he said Sunday."It wasn't as planned or hoped for but I guess in another way it's the journey of a lifetime so lots of stories."Hansen said he didn't know that an American woman had the virus until he landed in Canada on Sunday, and spoke with CBC News at the airport."I guess on the one hand it's upsetting because to know that there was one case but we're feeling fine, we've had health scans, temperature scans and we don't have any concerns for our own health."The ordeal ended for most passengers when Cambodia agreed to let guests disembark on Friday..One of the passengers who got off the ship was an American woman who then flew to Malaysia. She has since tested positive for COVID-19 and that has posed a concern for health experts concerned about the spread of the illness.University of Toronto infectious disease researcher Dr. Anna Banerji told CBC Sunday afternoon that passengers should be quarantined.Banerj said the use of quarantine has proved effective in the past, including during the SARS outbreak, and said it should be used until a vaccine can be made for the virus."It's concerning to me that there's a passenger on this cruise line that tested positive for coronavirus and the fact that this cruise line was not quarantined that makes other passengers at risk."Watch | Canadian health officials urge Westerdam passengers to stay in their homes:He said he's just glad to be back on Canadian soil. He and his wife had to go through at least three countries before going to Vancouver and worried immigration officials might stop them."It felt a little bit like that movie Argo where you're trying to get the Iranian hostages out."Hansen had praise for the crew on board and said apart from being stuck at sea and having "mounting anxiety," during the ordeal the rest of the trip was great.Holland America said in a statement no other guests or crew have reported symptoms of the illness. The company said passengers who've already returned home will be contacted by health officials.