A documentary or a tell-all book: Greg Parsons wants the full story of his mother's murder told

·3 min read
Greg Parsons says he wants the full story of his mother's murder told.  (John Pike/CBC - image credit)
Greg Parsons says he wants the full story of his mother's murder told. (John Pike/CBC - image credit)
Greg Parsons says he wants the full story of his mother's murder told.
Greg Parsons says he wants the full story of his mother's murder told. (John Pike/CBC)

Gregory Parsons says he will never give up until the man who killed his mother is appropriately punished, and believes his story — which includes one of Canada's most notorious wrongful convictions — should be told in a documentary or a book.

The most recent chapter came during a parole hearing on Friday when convicted murderer Brian Doyle had his day parole privileges revoked after failing to immediately report his relationship with his partner to his parole officer. It took Doyle six weeks to disclose the information. His parole officer called the breach serious, and parole board members called Doyle's transparency and honesty into question throughout the hearing.

"We're very pleased that his day parole has been taken away. He should have never got it. He should have been convicted of first-degree murder," Parsons told CBC News on Monday.

At Friday's hearing, Parsons read a 30-page victim impact statement that included passages from a previously unreported transcript of an alleged conversation between Doyle and undercover police officers in Ontario in 2002. The officers posed as clients attempting to hire Doyle to carry out a murder.

The passages came from tapes Parsons received from late RNC chief Bob Johnston. Parsons told CBC News he had the recordings for years, and spent $2,700 for a quality improvement and transcription service in recent weeks.

The tapes include conversations between Doyle and an undercover officer about his past, including the 1991 slaying of Catherine Carroll, Parsons's mother. Parsons was wrongfully convicted in 1994 of his mother's murder, but DNA evidence cleared him in 1998.

Brian Doyle, seen in this photo from 2002, was convicted of a lesser charge of second-degree murder in the death of Catherine Carroll, 45.
Brian Doyle, seen in this photo from 2002, was convicted of a lesser charge of second-degree murder in the death of Catherine Carroll, 45.(CBC)

Parsons said the tapes prove the murder was premeditated, establishing that Doyle wore extra socks and took larger shoes from a New Year's Eve party to walk to Carroll's home the night of the murder, brought the murder weapon with him to her bedroom and later returned to the party to take a nap and establish an alibi.

Parsons said the evidence was never addressed in the agreed statement of facts.

"It does say in the agreed statement of facts that he returned to the party briefly. There was no mention of the fact that he lied down. It was all hand-picked evidence. The true package was not put out there," Parsons said.

Parsons's transcript of the sting tapes also includes a conversation in which Doyle describes himself as having no guilt for Parsons being wrongfully convicted.

'Justice has not been done yet'

The decision to revoke Doyle's day parole will be revisited in 90 days.

Parsons told CBC News on Monday that while he will never stop seeking justice for his mother, he now sees an end to it.

WATCH | Anthony Germain speaks with Greg Parsons about his dedication to following convicted killer Brian Doyle through the parole system:

"My goal is to just get this story out," he said.

"I want to get it out on Netflix, or some big media or get it out in a good book form. I want the whole story from start to finish, and it's not for vengeance or anything like that. It's that it's such a huge mistake in proprieties that we have to learn from this and we have to fix it."

Parsons will be in attendance at Doyle's next parole hearing, he said. He plans to provide another victim impact statement, based on some things Doyle said in Friday's hearing, and he's also looking for a lawyer to help him.

"It won't take me no more than an hour to write the next impact statement, and I'm ready for the next hearing," Parsons said.

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