Drew Brees' kids are the best thing about the Pro Bowl

Look, let’s be honest: the Pro Bowl at this point is little more than a glorified playground game, all Hail Marys and trickeration. So it stands to reason that the real winners of the game weren’t the AFC or the NFC, but three boys who tussled like they were on an actual playground.

The three sons of New Orleans Saints quarterback Drew Brees, Baylen, Callen, and Bowen, had interviewed with Saints/NFC coach Sean Payton earlier in the week to get jobs as ballboys. They got the gig, and on Sunday, they got some airtime as well. As Baylen discussed what it was like being on the sidelines, Callen and Bowen absolutely threw down in the background.

It was a brilliant interview, especially when Baylen broke up the fight with a shoulder-jab. And Callen got himself in quite a bit of trouble with Pops for running on the field while the game was going on. But still: not a bad gig for the three kids.

As for the game itself … come on, you don’t really care who won that, do you? (For the record: the AFC came back from a 20-3 deficit to win 24-23, and the Titans’ Delanie Walker, with two touchdowns, won MVP. There you go.)

Drew Brees’ kids were the hit of the Pro Bowl. (via screenshot)

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Jay Busbee is a writer for Yahoo Sports. Contact him at jay.busbee@yahoo.com or find him on Twitter or on Facebook.

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