Even Gayle King cried during Oprah Winfrey’s visit to her exhibit

Jeremy Belanger
Producer, Yahoo Entertainment

It was an emotional affair as Oprah Winfrey toured her exhibit at the National Museum of African American History and Culture. On CBS This Morning, anchor Gayle King, Winfrey’s good friend, joined her for a tour of the exhibit. It had many pieces from throughout her career, including clips of her humble local news beginnings.

Winfrey also read a letter she had written just eight hours before taping her first national The Oprah Winfrey Show. She prophetically wrote, “Why have I been so blessed? Maybe going national was to help me realize that I have an important work or that this work is important. I just know that I must be pressed to the mark of a high calling.”

The legendary TV host took much of the exhibit in stride until she read the guestbook, signed by visitors. One person wrote, “Oprah Winfrey is the reason I love myself so fiercely and know that my voice matters.”

She was overcome with emotion, saying, “That makes me want to cry.”

In closing the segment, King also became emotional, telling her co-anchors that what most affects Winfrey is seeing the positive impact on people’s lives.

Watch: Mira Sorvino’s emotional reaction to Harvey Weinstein’s arrest:

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