Ontario faces swing from tropical remnants to lake-effect snow

Ontario faces swing from tropical remnants to lake-effect snow
Ontario faces swing from tropical remnants to lake-effect snow

Get ready for a swing in seasons across southern Ontario as we lurch from warmer temperatures and rain influenced by the remnants of Hurricane Nicole to the arrival of chilly temperatures and lake-effect snow squalls in time for the weekend.

Plunging temperatures and a snowy set-up are expected across the region, including heavy lake-effect snow squalls in the traditional snowbelt regions. This will be the first major and multi-day snow squall event of the season, so drivers are urged to prepare for the changing and deteriorating conditions.

By next week, flakes are set to fly across sections of the Greater Toronto Area (GTA) as well, marking an end to the extended fall warmth and the beginning of more December-like weather. More on the timing and impacts, below.

MUST SEE: A snowstorm and tropical system set to collide over Eastern Canada

Friday: Last days of rare November warmth, eyes on tropical moisture

By Friday, daytime highs will still be warm -- though the end of the extended mild fall weather -- but with rain set to spread into southern parts of the region as the remnants of Nicole, a tropical system in the Atlantic, surge north.

SEE ALSO: Could a hurricane’s remnants give Canada its last 20C temperature?

SONRain
SONRain

Between 15-25 mm of rain is expected for the GTA through Friday, and 30-50+ mm for the Niagara region and eastern Ontario.

DON'T MISS: Why snow squalls are one of the hardest events to forecast

This weekend and beyond: December-like temperatures take hold, threat for heavy lake-effect snow

Conditions will also turn blustery and much colder behind the front, with snow flurries and lake-effect snow squalls expected to develop southeast of Lake Huron and Georgian Bay late Saturday and Sunday. This will be the first multi-day snow squall event of the season.

FORECAST: Winter storm ramps up in northern Ontario with heavy snow, ice accumulations

SONWindChill
SONWindChill

The hardest hit areas could locally see 10-20 cm of snow.

Widespread colder than seasonal temperatures are set to dominate next week and beyond, with temperatures more typical of early December at times.

This should bring additional lake-effect snow to the traditional snowbelt areas east and southeast of the Great Lakes.

Snow2
Snow2

DON'T MISS: Icy weather is inevitable. Here's what you need to prepare

Some parts of the GTA could even see flakes flying in the sky, and while no accumulations are expected because the ground is still warm, it'll serve as a reminder that winter is indeed on its way.

Be sure to check back for the latest weather updates across Ontario.