Fort Liard woman guilty of manslaughter in death of Danny Klondike

·2 min read
A Fort Liard woman has been convicted of manslaughter in the 2018 stabbing of her partner, Danny Klondike. (Walter Strong/CBC - image credit)
A Fort Liard woman has been convicted of manslaughter in the 2018 stabbing of her partner, Danny Klondike. (Walter Strong/CBC - image credit)

Selena Lomen has been found guilty of manslaughter in the stabbing death of her partner Danny Klondike, 34.

Justice Andrew Mahar addressed Danny Klondike's family members during the verdict and said his decision in "no way excuses" Lomen's actions.

He acknowledged the couple had a tumultuous relationship and that the couple had been having serious problems in the weeks and months prior, related to Danny Klondike's drinking.

Selena Lomen called her mother in Fort Nelson, B.C., asking if she could stay with her, just hours before she fatally stabbed Klondike in their home in Fort Liard, N.W.T.

Defence lawyer Peter Harte argued that Selena Lomen was remorseful when she turned herself into RCMP after stabbing Klondike.

However, Mahar said "remorsefulness doesn't prove that there wasn't intent."

To convict someone of second-degree murder, the Crown must prove there was intent to kill.

Some of the evidence left Mahar with reasonable doubt that Lomen intended to kill Klondike, like the nature of the knife wound.

Mahar said Lomen could have intended to stab Klondike in the shoulder and that the victim, being very intoxicated, might have turned his body, which could have led to the knife wounding him in the stomach instead.

The couple's 14-month-old son was in the home when the crime took place.

Members of Klondike's family wept when the judge gave his decision and left the courthouse crying and consoling each other.

Lomen appeared virtually from the Fort Smith, N.W.T., correctional facility and was emotional during the verdict, removing her glasses to wipe away tears.

A sentencing date hasn't been confirmed yet but Crown prosecutor Duane Praught, along with defence attorney Peter Harte, suggested that it should be done in Fort Liard.

The judge agreed and said the trial had a profound impact on the community and that moving it there would be appropriate.