Four generations clash in golf match near Moncton

·2 min read
Jim Maxwell and his great-grandson Cayden after they won the first annual Maxwell Golf Association Four Generational Invitational. (Macrae Maxwell - image credit)
Jim Maxwell and his great-grandson Cayden after they won the first annual Maxwell Golf Association Four Generational Invitational. (Macrae Maxwell - image credit)

A golfing tradition continues this week for one New Brunswick family, one that pits several generations against one another.

The Maxwells, who refer to themselves as the Maxwell Golf Association, will battle on the green at the Lakeside Golf Club near Moncton at what they affectionately call the Four Generational Invitational.

Eighty-two-year-old former golf pro Jim Maxwell will team up with his great-grandson Cayden to take on son Gair and grandson Ryan.

Jim said the idea for the family affair came up when he was a younger man…79-years-old.

"I should really do something about it and try and have the four generations play a round of golf together," said Jim.

"I thought about it more and more. And then I told Gair about it and he said, 'Oh, that's a great idea.'"

Scotland to Canada

Golf seems to come easily to the Maxwell family, and it should, considering Jim was born near the Old Course at St Andrews in Scotland.

"I was playing my first tournament when I was eight years old … and I won that," said Jim.

"Where I lived on the east coast of Scotland, in the summertime you could play 54 holes a day in daylight."

While Jim would apprentice as a club maker in Scotland before moving to Canada to become a pro at the Lambton Golf and Country Club in Toronto, he never actually taught his children golf or pressured them to take up the sport.

Macrae Maxwell
Macrae Maxwell

"I was too busy working," said Jim.

"I had a wife and three kids, and they had a bad habit. They wanted three meals a day and a roof over their head, and I couldn't understand it."

Unfortunately for the rest of the Maxwells, it means that Jim at 82 is still the unquestioned pro in the family, and he said when it comes to golf they're "not even close" to his level.

Future

Jim is happy to be able to play the sport he loves into his 82nd year, but he admits some health issues likely mean he won't be able to play in the yearly match much longer.

But he hopes the game will continue long after he's gone.

"I told my son last night. I said, 'When I die, I want you to continue this tournament'," said Jim.

Even though it's a family event, Jim hasn't lost his sense of competitiveness and he expects his partner Cayden to come prepared.

"I don't care if we win handily, just as long as we win," said Jim.

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