Gaps remain in involuntary psychiatric admission compliance, says B.C. ombudsperson

·1 min read

VICTORIA — A report says three-year-old recommendations to protect the legal rights of people involuntarily admitted to psychiatric facilities in British Columbia are still not being adequately implemented.

Ombudsperson Jay Chalke says the legally required documents for involuntary admissions are only being completed 42 per cent of the time.

Chalke says that is up from 28 per cent when he made his recommendations in 2019, but still represents a significant gap in compliance by mental health facilities.

The original report found admission documents were often missing, late or improperly completed.

It said some facilities used rubber stamps to authorize treatment for patients, instead of describing what treatment was being proposed.

The B.C. government, which was not immediately available for comment, passed the Mental Health Amendment Act last month establishing a rights advice service for patients at mental health facilities.

This report by The Canadian Press was first published July 26, 2022.

The Canadian Press

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