Group that redirects food from landfills to people in need wants more P.E.I. participants

·2 min read
People hand off a pallet of food in this promotional photo by Second Harvest. The group collects excess food that would otherwise go to waste and delivers it to non-profit organizations. (Second Harvest - image credit)
People hand off a pallet of food in this promotional photo by Second Harvest. The group collects excess food that would otherwise go to waste and delivers it to non-profit organizations. (Second Harvest - image credit)

A group that helps steer food away from landfills says its recent expansion into Atlantic Canada has gone well, but now it wants even more businesses and non-profits to sign on.

Second Harvest matches up businesses that sell food with local non-profit organizations that distribute food. Its mission is to rescue food that restaurants or grocery stores would otherwise throw out.

The group, which dates back to 1985, expanded eastward more than a year ago. Eighteen Island non-profits and eight food donors have signed up since then.

Mike Hardy, director of operations for Second Harvest in Atlantic Canada, says about $72,000, or 10,400 kilograms, of food on P.E.I. has been donated through the group's app since March 2020.

Sobeys a major contributor

An additional 45,000 kilograms of off-line donations were shared, mainly from the grocery chain Sobeys, he said.

Hardy said about 40,000 kilograms of greenhouse gas emissions have been averted from this food not going to the landfill.

He says he's looking to work with food businesses of all sizes.

"It's a free app," he said. "I encourage everyone to give it a try or give me a call and we can talk about what they have and how we can make that available in their communities."

No quota

Hardy said the focus is on nutrient-dense perishables: meat, dairy and produce.

"These are obviously great healthy options and often are too expensive for many families to be able to afford on their budgets," he told Island Morning's Laura Chapin.

Hardy said people taking part in the program are not expected to meet a quota.

"It is when you have that surplus, we can help you find a home for it," he said.

More from CBC P.E.I.

Our goal is to create a safe and engaging place for users to connect over interests and passions. In order to improve our community experience, we are temporarily suspending article commenting