Hampton farm owners looking for people to till the soil

·2 min read
Luke and Jill Coleman are offering their farmland to people looking to get into the farm business in a partnership model. (Luke Coleman/Facebook - image credit)
Luke and Jill Coleman are offering their farmland to people looking to get into the farm business in a partnership model. (Luke Coleman/Facebook - image credit)

If you've ever wanted to try your hand at living off the land, but had no land to live off of, Belding Hill Farm in Hampton is offering a solution.

Luke Coleman, who runs the farm with his wife Jill, said they are mainly homesteaders with full time jobs outside of farming, and are just looking to produce enough for themselves.

But they have a lot of land, 240 acres, and equipment, which includes a sawmill.

Coleman said this means a lot of untapped potential.

"We just would like to get some energized people who have a passion, but just because of financial circumstances or whatever, that they can't buy their own land and, you know, do all this stuff," said Coleman.

Coleman said he's willing to let farmers and other tradespeople use the land and equipment for free, with the farm becoming part owner of that business.

Failure not a concern

He said he wants to make sure the farm attracts the right people, and he's not overly concerned if they're not successful at the job immediately.

"If you ask Jill and I, we're the worst two farmers in the world," said Coleman.

"As long as no one gets hurt, then all these things don't matter. If you plowed up a piece of ground and you planted lettuce and it never took, well, you're out the cost of seeds. But the upside potential is that you get a whole harvest of locally grown food that would be available to the public."

Coleman said he and his wife had discussed hiring people to operate the sawmill or do other work on the farm, but he didn't want to get into an employee-employer relationship.

Jill Coleman with a farmyard friend at Belding Hill Farms
Jill Coleman with a farmyard friend at Belding Hill Farms(Belding Hill Farms/Facebook)

"We felt that if we were in that employee-employer relationship, it adds management time," said Coleman.

"With the amount of stuff that we do on the farm now, we have to be efficient with what we do and that's not an efficient use of time."

He said people who do sign on to use the farm can rest assured it's not going anywhere. The couple plan to stay on the farm for years to come.

"My great grandfather lived here. My grandparents lived here. My father lived here. Now we live here," said Coleman.