Happy Valley-Goose Bay looks at creating Labrador's first daily public bus service

·2 min read
Jennifer Mitchell of Happy Valley-Goose Bay says the proposed bus service is a great idea for the town, especially for those who would otherwise need a cab or a lift from a friend. (Rafsan Faruqe Jugol/CBC - image credit)
Jennifer Mitchell of Happy Valley-Goose Bay says the proposed bus service is a great idea for the town, especially for those who would otherwise need a cab or a lift from a friend. (Rafsan Faruqe Jugol/CBC - image credit)

Happy Valley-Goose Bay could soon have a public transit system servicing the town and connecting with Sheshatshiu and North West River.

A feasibility study released in November by Dalhousie University recommended implementing the service, which would be the first of its kind in Labrador.

"It opens up the community to everybody... whether it's a single mom who doesn't have transportation that needs to go to work or someone without a vehicle that needs to go to the airport," said George Andrews, mayor of Happy Valley-Goose Bay, on CBC Radio's Labrador Morning.

The upfront cost for establishing each route is estimated at around $180,000, with a combined annual cost of just over $670,000.

The study was sponsored by the town of Happy Valley-Goose Bay, and lays out a detailed map for implementation, however the council has yet to make a decision on it.

"I would hope the committee will be getting at it shortly after Christmas with the intent of doing due diligence to the file," said Andrews.

Dalhousie Univeristy
Dalhousie Univeristy

The study recommends two Routes.

Route one would connect the core areas of Happy Valley-Goose Bay as well as the regional airport, a 28 kilometre route with stops running at one-hour intervals.

Route two would link up with the first, connecting Sheshatshiu and North West River to Happy Valley-Goose Bay. That would service a 92 kilometre stretch, running every three hours.

Dalhousie University
Dalhousie University

The recommendation has already gained approval in the community.

"A lot of people have to use cabs or get rides from other people... its pretty cold here in the winter and I think it's a great idea," said Jennifer Mitchell, originally from Northern Labrador but now living in the town.

Another resident, Caroline Davis, agrees. "Hopefully it's not too much of a tax burden on the community, but it is something that is needed."

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