Harrow, Ont., residents are trying to catch a pair of 'fabulous' peacocks that are roaming wild

These two peacocks were spotted roaming around in Harrow, Ont., and are now the subject of a search. (Submitted by Sherry Weir - image credit)
These two peacocks were spotted roaming around in Harrow, Ont., and are now the subject of a search. (Submitted by Sherry Weir - image credit)

Sherry Weir's backyard in Harrow, Ont., suddenly became a lot more colourful this week when a mating pair of peacocks randomly appeared.

Unsure what to do, Weir kept her dog inside while she gawked alongside her neighbour as the two birds were "pacing back and forth between our fences." Eventually, she called animal control, worried the couple wouldn't survive a cold Canadian winter.

"They were just fabulous to watch, and they were just so interesting. They were so beautiful," Weir told CBC's Afternoon Drive on Wednesday.

After Weir posted about it on Facebook, commenters speculated where the peacocks may have came from. The birds could be household pets, but officials say nobody has reported missing peacocks or come forward to claim them.

"They're somebody's pet and they've disregarded them or something, or they've gotten away from them," said Nancy Phillips with the Wings Rehabilitation Centre in Amherstburg, Ont.

LISTEN | Sherry Weir tells Josiah Sinanan, on Afternoon Drive with Allison Devereaux, that the peacocks jumped her fence:

Weir said she's heard the peacocks were prancing around a main road earlier this week. She believes they've been wandering the neighbourhood for a few days.

"Some guy tried to catch them and he couldn't catch them, so he just ended up shooing them off the main road because we thought they were going to get hit by a car," said Weir.

Submitted by Sherry Weir
Submitted by Sherry Weir

Animal control officials in Essex County say although peacocks aren't native to this area, they can survive the winter as wild animals. However, they hope to still capture them so Wings Rehabilitation Centre can care for them.

"We would have to count on the public to let us know where they are. At this point, we don't know where they are," said Marlene Buis with Animal Control Services Essex.

"They don't stay in one place very long. They continue to move throughout their day to find food and only at night will they find a place to roost, which is usually in a tree."