Wintry weather arrives in Atlantic Canada with its first significant snowfall

Digital Writers
·3 min read
Wintry weather arrives in Atlantic Canada with its first significant snowfall
Wintry weather arrives in Atlantic Canada with its first significant snowfall
Wintry weather arrives in Atlantic Canada with its first significant snowfall
Wintry weather arrives in Atlantic Canada with its first significant snowfall

Parts of Atlantic Canada are getting their first taste of winter, with accumulating snow in northern New Brunswick and Newfoundland as a result of plummeting temperatures and a low-pressure system. For the former, the snow will transition to rain Monday overnight and continue until Tuesday morning. Parts of the latter will see snow persist until the late morning hours Tuesday before it changes to rain. Special weather statements are effect, with the aformentioned regions expected to receive between 5-15 cm of snow. More on when the snow will end, plus a look at another possible influence from the tropics, below.

WEATHER HIGHLIGHTS:

  • Special weather statements in northern New Brunswick and Newfoundland, with 5-15 cm of snow for some through Tuesday

  • Precipitation begins to move out in western Maritimes Tuesday morning

  • Much colder pattern across the region this week

TUESDAY: SNOW CHANGES TO RAIN, SLICK CONDITIONS, TEMPERATURE DIVIDE

Northern New Brunswick and Newfoundland saw its first shot of snow Monday as the low pushed through the region. Special weather statements are in effect for the aforementioned regions.

Precipitation in northern New Brunswick will switch to rain in the overnight and will persist until Tuesday morning as the system continues tracking east. Southern areas of the province, along with Nova Scotia, which only received rain, will see precipitation taper off by early Tuesday afternoon.

ATLsnow
ATLsnow

In Newfoundland, snow will continue pushing through Newfoundland in the overnight hours and will begin changing to rain along the west coast in the pre-dawn hours Tuesday as temperatures start to climb. There may even be a brief shot of freezing rain in central and northern areas during the transition to rain.

When all is said and done with the system, 5-10 cm of snow is forecast for much of the affected regions through Tuesday, though locally heavier amounts up to 15 cm possible where temperatures are cooler.

"Surfaces such as highways, roads, walkways and parking lots may become difficult to navigate. Motorists should be prepared for winter driving conditions," warns Environment Canada in statement.

Temperatures will be fairly divided in the region Tuesday. Southern Maritimes and southeastern Newfoundland including the Avalon will be above seasonal, with daytime highs in the low- to mid-teens. However, northern half of the Maritimes, and northern and western Newfoundland will be on chilly side, with temperatures mainly in the single digits.

ATLTuesTemp
ATLTuesTemp

By Wednesday, the entire region will be below seasonal.

LATE WEEK: CLOSELY WATCH THE REMNANTS OF ZETA

Forecasters are closely watching Hurricane Zeta and its potential impact in Atlantic Canada later this week.

"We'll be watching the remnants of Zeta, a rather large and potent storm, as it tracks south of the region on Friday and Saturday," says Weather Network meteorologist Dr. Doug Gillham.

ZetaTrack
ZetaTrack

The northern edge of the storm may clip the southern Maritimes with some light rain or snow showers, but with minimal impact expected other than a blustery northerly wind.

Conditions look to be cold and blustery for Halloween on Saturday, with a strengthening fall storm on track for later Sunday.

Be sure to check back for the most up-to-date weather in your area.