Here's how you can get your sleep back on track after the clocks fall back

·2 min read
An extra hour of sleep is a great way to start daylight time, but making a full transition to the time change usually takes a couple of days. (Credit: iStock/Getty Images - image credit)
An extra hour of sleep is a great way to start daylight time, but making a full transition to the time change usually takes a couple of days. (Credit: iStock/Getty Images - image credit)
Credit: iStock/Getty Images
Credit: iStock/Getty Images

Everybody loves the idea of getting that extra hour of sleep as the clocks fall back in the Fall, but making a full transition to the daylight time change can sometimes be a long or tiring process. Luckily, sleep consultant Julia Corcoran has got some tips.

Changing the clocks affects the body's circadian rhythm, which Corcoran said is thrown off by sudden time changes in both the Fall and Spring. People are also creatures of habit, which can lead to some anxiety or the need for extra planning.

Age can also play a factor in how well your body handles the change. For example, babies or young toddlers can see some of the greatest impacts since they aren't able to fully grasp the concept of what time is.

But no matter your age, Corcoran said making a smooth transition should always start with trying to keep things business as usual.

"Get up on Sunday morning and try to get a cup of coffee," she told The St. John's Morning Show Friday. "Don't change your clocks right away, have a coffee, follow your normal routine. Then change your clocks. Then it won't seem to hurt so much."

Julia Corcoran Pediatric Sleep Consulting/Facebook
Julia Corcoran Pediatric Sleep Consulting/Facebook

For young children, Corcoran said it's important for parents to try to keep the big jumps to a minimum and recommends trying to keep kids in bed for between 15 and 20 minutes longer to make the shift smaller. Moving bedtime up on Sunday can also help, adding it's best to move in 15 minute increments.

For adults, Corcoran said avoiding things like afternoon naps, evening caffeine and alcohol can all help you get back on schedule. However, the best tip she can give to anyone is to get outside during the day and follow your routine in the evening.

"Go outside and get the sun in your face. That's going to help to help to set your circadian rhythm," she said. "[In the evening], your body will sense that you are doing you're bedtime routine, it will start to relax into sleep."

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