From hydroponics to fishing in Nunavut: Feds announce funding for northern projects

·2 min read
Stanley Ferdinand filets a large trout he caught in Great Bear Lake in Délı̨nę, N.W.T., in September 2016. CanNor announced Friday it will spend $72,800 on preparatory work toward establishing a country foods processing facility in the community.  (Pat Kane/Reuters  - image credit)
Stanley Ferdinand filets a large trout he caught in Great Bear Lake in Délı̨nę, N.W.T., in September 2016. CanNor announced Friday it will spend $72,800 on preparatory work toward establishing a country foods processing facility in the community. (Pat Kane/Reuters - image credit)

The federal government has announced which projects it will be injecting funds into from the Canadian Northern Economic Development Agency (CanNor), in a Friday news release.

CanNor is meant to support projects that promote "sustainable community economic development, enhance business development and growth, and facilitate innovation."

In the Northwest Territories, over $550,000 was announced by MP Michael McLeod on behalf of the Northern Affairs minister, to go toward five Indigenous projects.

The Łı́ı́dlı̨ı̨ Kų́ę́ First Nation (LKFN) is receiving $56,872 for a one-year project to establish a community investment trust fund.

LKFN is also getting $247,290 in funding to help buy and install a hydroponic garden system in Fort Simpson and to train for local Indigenous operators.

A small, Indigenous-owned fishery based in Yellowknife, Morin's Fisheries Ltd., is getting $99,999 to go toward a one-year project. The company has bought equipment for a winter fishery on Great Slave Lake and has further developed its commercialization strategy.

Aurora Heat, a company that makes and sells sheared beaver products, is getting $91,150 to help it buy and install a fur press and to go toward the development and marketing of a new product.

The Délı̨nę Got'ı̨nę Government will receive $72,800 toward a one-year project for work toward establishing a country foods processing facility in Délı̨nę.

Meanwhile, Nunavut's fishing industry is getting a $2.4 million boost from CanNor, according to a federal government news release Thursday. The funds will go to three projects that support research, training and marketing, the release said.

The funds will see $1.2 million to the Nunavut Fisheries Association to monitor stock sustainability and to explore the possibility of adding new species to Nunavut's commercial fisheries.

The Nunavut government will get $1.14 million to increase available monitoring data for Greenland Halibut and Arctic Char.

And, the Nunavut Fisheries and Marine Training Consortium will get $100,000 to develop a new strategic plan to improve training for Inuit fishermen through a mentoring program.

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