Indiana governor signs nation's first post-Roe abortion ban moments after it lands on his desk

·2 min read
Abortion-rights protesters demonstrate inside the Indiana State house. As the legislature is holding a special session to consider curtailing abortion rights in the wake of the U.S. Supreme Court ruling overturning Roe v. Wade last month, abortion rights activists protested in Indianapolis.
Abortion-rights protesters demonstrate inside the Indiana State house. As the legislature is holding a special session to consider curtailing abortion rights in the wake of the U.S. Supreme Court ruling overturning Roe v. Wade last month, abortion rights activists protested in Indianapolis.Jeremy Hogan/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images
  • Indiana is the first state in the country to pass an abortion ban since Roe v. Wade was overturned.

  • The ban makes abortion illegal except in cases of rape, incest, and if death may occur.

  • Gov. Eric Holcomb signed the bill before it had even been on his desk for an hour.

Indiana is now the first state to have established an abortion ban since the overturning of Roe V. Wade, the landmark ruling that established abortion rights across the country in 1973, The Indianapolis Star reported.

Indiana lawmakers passed Senate Bill 1 and sent it to Gov. Eric Holcomb's desk late Friday night. He signed it into law not even an hour later.

The bill makes exceptions for abortions on the conditions of rape or incest before 10 weeks after fertilization and in cases where the pregnancy threatens the life of the pregnant individual. The bill adds an additional exception if "the fetus is diagnosed with a lethal fetal anomaly."

Prior to the bill, abortions had been allowed in the state up until 20 weeks post-fertilization since the year 2010.

"Following the overturning of Roe, I stated clearly that I would be willing to support legislation that made progress in protecting life. In my view, SEA 1 accomplishes this goal following its passage in both chambers of the Indiana General Assembly with a solid majority of support," Holcomb said in a statement Friday night.

The ban goes into effect on September 15.

Holcomb and the Indiana legislature did not immediately respond to Insider's request for comment.

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