'Indiana Jones 5' will finally start filming in April

Ben Arnold
Contributor
Raiders of the Lost Ark (Credit: Lucasfilm)

Harrison Ford has confirmed that the long-awaited fifth movie in the Indiana Jones series will start filming in April.

He dropped the nugget during an interview with CBS for its Sunday Morning show, set to go out this weekend.

Asked about the challenge of coming back to a role after many years – the inference being those of Han Solo or Indiana Jones – Ford joked: “Trying not to look silly running around in tight pants and high boots.”

He then added: “I'll try and give you a more appropriate answer, considering that I'm going to start doing Indiana Jones in about two months.

Read more: Five things you might not know about Indiana Jones’s whip

“If we have the opportunity to make another, it’s because people have enjoyed them.”

It has been some time since Ford has donned the fedora to play the intrepid archeologist, with Indiana Jones and the Kingdom of the Crystal Skull having landed in 2008.

Talk of the so-far untitled fifth movie began soon after, and back then there was even talk of making Shia LaBeouf's character Mutt Williams, from the fourth movie, the lead.

A year lated LaBeouf said in an interview that Steven Spielberg had cracked the story for the fifth film, something Karen Allen, who plays Marion Ravenwood, later confirmed too.

However, the takeover of Lucasfilm by Disney has somewhat delayed the advancement of the project, while it took on the Star Wars universe, and it’s now thought that Mutt Williams is not involved.

Indiana Jones and the Kingdom of the Crystal Skull (Credit: Lucasfilm)

Then in 2015, in an interview with Vanity Fair, Lucasfilm boss Kathy Kennedy confirmed a fifth movie was in the pipeline, with George Lucas returning as an executive producer.

Various writers have been involved too from David Koepp (who penned Crystal Skull) to Jonathan Kasdan, the latter's story rumoured to be about a fabled train full of nazi gold that was buried in a tunnel in the last days of the Second World War.

Meanwhile, in case anyone was wondering, both Ford and Disney boss Bob Iger have said that the plan is not to kill off Dr. Jones (though Ford will be pushing 80 when the movie is released).

However, Iger has said that a fifth film will 'not be a one-off', so perhaps the torch will be handed on to someone else.

  • Alberta expands coronavirus testing to travellers from 6 more places
    News
    CBC

    Alberta expands coronavirus testing to travellers from 6 more places

    Alberta Health Services is expanding the coronavirus testing of travellers to include six more places in addition to mainland China amid fears of a global pandemic.Dr. Deena Hinshaw, Alberta's chief medical officer of health, said at a press conference on Wednesday that people coming from Hong Kong, Singapore, Iran, Korea, Japan and Italy will also be tested for COVID-19."We ask any travellers returning from these areas in addition to those returning from mainland China to monitor their symptoms for 14 days after returning."Hinshaw adds recent travellers should self-monitor for symptoms — like a fever or cough — but do not need to self isolate unless returning from China's Hubei province."We do not know what direction the outbreak will take next but we do know that we need to be prepared for a scenario where COVID-19 continues to spread in countries around the world," she said.As well, everyone should practise good infection prevention habits, such as washing hands and covering up coughs in order to reduce chances of it spreading, she said.However, Hinshaw adds the risk of contracting COVID-19 in Alberta still remains low, so there is no need to stay home or avoid public places.Number of cases growing globallyThe World Health Organization's director-general, Dr. Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, said Thursday that countries with their first confirmed cases of novel coronavirus should "move swiftly" to contain the virus — noting that the concern over cases outside of China is growing as the number of people infected mounts.Within the past 24 hours, seven countries — Brazil, Georgia, Greece, Macedonia, Norway, Pakistan and Romania — have reported cases for the first time, he told reporters at a daily briefing. For the past two days, Tedros said, the number of new cases reported in the rest of the world has exceeded the number of new cases reported in China."This virus does not respect borders," he said. "The point is not only to prevent cases arriving on your shores — the point is what you do when you have cases."The outbreak — which WHO has declared a global health emergency — has "pandemic potential," Tedros said, noting that WHO is working with countries around the world to prepare.He reiterated his message that fear is not the answer, and called for calm as countries prepare.Tedros noted that several countries — including Belgium, Cambodia, India, Nepal, the Philippines, Russia, Sri Lanka and Vietnam — have gone two weeks without reporting a new case. He said this signalled that "aggressive, early measures can prevent transmission before the coronavirus gets a foothold."On Thursday, China had reported 78,630 cases to WHO, with 2,747 deaths, Tedros said. Outside of China, there were 3,474 cases in 44 countries, with 54 deaths.In Canada, Ontario reported a sixth case of COVID-19 on Thursday, bringing the total in Canada to 13. The remaining seven cases are in British Columbia.Thursday's case announcement comes a day after Canadian health officials said they are working on containment but are also preparing for the possibility of more cases.Calgary's Chinatown business downBusinesses in Chinatowns across Canada have reported a drop in activity since COVID-19 hit China.The Ho Wan Restaurant in Calgary has had a similar experience, with sales being reduced by more than half.Most of Calgary's city councillors had lunch at a restaurant in Chinatown this week to try to help reduce fears about the new coronavirus.Coun. Druh Farrell of Ward 7, which includes Chinatown, said council members went to the restaurant for lunch to show Calgarians it's safe to eat out."Chinatown is filled with family-owned restaurants and we need to support them or lose them," she said. "It is a treasured community."At Ho Wan Restaurant, the owners' son, Jason Zhang, says business is down about 70 per cent."People are not coming out very much," he said in an interview. "It was the slowest Family Day I've seen.""It's hard to predict when people come out … but, in general, especially during the regular times, it's just a percentage shock."Mayor Naheed Nenshi says council has seen some myths and some uncertainties in relation to the coronavirus and wants to remind Calgarians that Alberta's public health system and Calgary Emergency Management System are strong if an outbreak should occur."Ultimately, it is very safe here in the city of Calgary. The chances of contracting anything are very, very, very low," he said. "We really encourage people to get out to support local businesses throughout the city, particularly at this time, to support our local Chinese-owned businesses."

  • Ministers wrap pipeline talks with hereditary chiefs for the day in B.C.
    News
    The Canadian Press

    Ministers wrap pipeline talks with hereditary chiefs for the day in B.C.

    SMITHERS, B.C. — The hereditary chiefs of the Wet'suwet'en sat down Thursday with senior government ministers to discuss a pipeline dispute that has caused protests across the country, shutting down freight and passenger rail services.Federal Crown-Indigenous Relations Minister Carolyn Bennett and British Columbia Indigenous Relations Minister Scott Fraser began the long-sought talks in the late afternoon and wrapped after about three hours, with a plan to resume Friday morning."Productive talks and we're continuing tomorrow," said Fraser, adding the mood in the room was "very good, very respectful" but it's not appropriate to discuss the details of what took place."We don't want to jeopardize anything. We had a productive day today and we're hoping for a very solid day tomorrow, too."Bennett said it was a "very good start."Freda Huson, a spokeswoman for the Unist'ot'en camp that has been set up near the pipeline work site, said the meeting Thursday only covered introductions and the mood was respectful. She said she will not attend on Friday because the meeting will only involve the head chiefs and government officials.Hereditary Chief Na'moks left without making a statement.Before the meeting began, both the RCMP and Coastal GasLink said they agreed to conditions requested by the chiefs to allow the discussions to progress.The natural gas company agreed to a two-day pause in its activities in northwestern B.C., while the RCMP committed to ending patrols along a critical roadway while the negotiations unfold.The chiefs praised the moves in a statement released before the talks got underway."We believe these conditions provide the space we need to be able to sit down at the table in good faith and a positive path forward," the statement read."We are so close and have called on the provincial and federal governments to support this de-escalation of activities so that this issue can be resolved."The chiefs said the meeting with Bennett and Fraser is a "first step," noting both Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and B.C. Premier John Horgan declined invitations to discuss the long-simmering issues that have gained fresh urgency in recent weeks.The chiefs' opposition to a natural gas pipeline cutting across their traditional territory, coupled with their efforts to limit police presence on their lands, have sparked shows of support across the country that have halted rail service for the past three weeks.Bennett said she hoped the meetings would pave the way to end the dispute and protests."Obviously this is very important," she said moments after arriving in Smithers. "We reaffirm our interest in talking to the Wet'suwet'en Nation and their issues of title and rights."Horgan said he has met with the hereditary leaders twice over the past year and a half and is prepared to sit down with them again, but there need to be conditions for constructive dialogue.Fraser understands the community's governance issues and Bennett represents the Crown in Canada, so the best way forward is for them to be at the table, he said."I think that this is a good step. I've been seeking peaceful dialogue for a couple of weeks and here we are," he said. "I'm looking forward to harmony as a result of those discussions."Indigenous Services Minister Marc Miller said the meeting was a victory for open dialogue and peaceful resolution, but it is only the beginning as there are underlying rights and title issues that will take time to resolve.Wet'suwet'en community members are divided on the pipeline and about a dozen supporters of the project gathered outside the Office of the Wet'suwet'en while the meeting took place.Bonnie George, a former Coastal GasLink employee who describes herself as a Wet'suwet'en matriarch, handed out a statement that she attributed to the Wet'suwet'en people."The public attention brought to our community is having a negative effect on our people and eroding our traditional ways," George said, reading from the statement.Hereditary chiefs are not decision-makers on their own and are instead meant to reflect the consensus of their clan or house and reach decisions together inside a traditional setting called a Feast House, she said.George said she wasn't invited to the meeting but she went into the room with others and they made a statement, telling the gathering that the entire nation needs to be represented.The dispute over the Coastal GasLink pipeline project has been raging for months, but entered a new phase on Dec. 31, 2019, when the B.C. Supreme Court granted the company an injunction calling for the removal of any obstructions from any roads, bridges or work sites it has been authorized to use in Wet'suwet'en territory.The RCMP moved in to enforce that injunction on Feb. 6. Hours later, protesters started holding up railway traffic outside of Belleville, Ont., in solidarity with the Wet'suwet'en hereditary chiefs, thwarting freight and passenger rail travel.In Ottawa, one Conservative MP questioned Thursday whether the blockades constitute acts of terrorism.Doug Shipley put the question to Public Safety Minister Bill Blair during testimony at the House of Commons public safety and national security committee.The rookie MP said he was asking on behalf of a constituent who sent him an email after a handful of protesters in the Belleville area lit fires near and on railway tracks the day before — actions that were denounced by Trudeau."This resident wanted to know if the current illegal blockades that are happening across Canada are being deemed as a terrorist activity?" Shipley asked.Blair said they were not, adding the government should not interfere with the police's ability to identify and investigate criminal activity in their jurisdiction."It's very appropriate that I be careful in doing that because I do not want to interfere with the operational independence of both the police and our prosecutors," he said. "But at the same time that was terribly unsafe, deeply concerning."RCMP Commissioner Brenda Lucki testified at the same committee hearing, saying the Mounties have discretion on how to enforce an injunction."Of course, enforcement is the last option," she said. "It's about dialogue and trying to find a peaceful resolution to the blockades."The Ontario Provincial Police took down a major blockade near Tyendinaga Mohawk Territory earlier this week. But about 20 demonstrators gathered near train tracks in Kingston, Ont., farther east along the same line, on Thursday morning.Local police said the group gathered on the Canadian National Railway Co. overpass, but train traffic had not been affected and officers were monitoring the situation.Police in Victoria said two protesters were arrested for mischief after using a substance to write messages that included profanity on the building, driveway and walkway of the B.C. legislature.This report by The Canadian Press was first published Feb. 27, 2020.—With files from Michelle McQuigge and Liam Casey in Toronto, Mike Blanchfield in Ottawa, and Beth Leighton and Laura Kane in Vancouver.Hina Alam, The Canadian Press

  • News
    The Canadian Press

    Timeline of COVID-19 cases in Canada

    Health officials in Ontario have confirmed another case of the novel coronavirus in the province. There have been 13 cases of COVID-19 diagnosed in Canada — six in Ontario and seven in British Columbia. Here is a timeline of Canadian cases.Jan. 25, 2020: A man in his 50s who arrived in Toronto from Wuhan, China, the epicentre of the outbreak, becomes the first "presumptive" case of the new coronavirus in Canada. The man called 911 as soon as he got sick with relatively minor symptoms and was placed in isolation in Toronto's Sunnybrook Hospital.Jan. 26, 2020: The wife of the Toronto man who was Canada's first "presumptive" case of the new coronavirus becomes the second presumptive case. The woman is kept in home isolation.Jan. 27, 2020: The National Microbiology Lab in Winnipeg confirms that a man in quarantine in Sunnybrook Hospital is Canada's first documented case of the new coronavirus.Jan 28, 2020: Health authorities confirm Canada's second case of the novel coronavirus. The woman had recently travelled to Wuhan with her husband, who was the first case confirmed in Canada.Jan 28, 2020: Health officials in British Columbia say a man in his 40s is presumed to have the new coronavirus and is doing well as he recovers at his Vancouver home. B.C.'s health officer, Dr. Bonnie Henry, says the man often works in China and voluntarily isolated himself upon returning to Canada.Jan. 28, 2020: The presumed case of the new strain of coronavirus in B.C. is confirmed by the National Microbiology Laboratory in Winnipeg.Jan. 31, 2020: Toronto man hospitalized with the novel coronavirus is well enough to go home. Sunnybrook Hospital says he'll continue to recover at home, where his wife is also in self-isolation.Jan. 31, 2020: Ontario's third case of the new coronavirus is confirmed. The patient, a woman in her 20s, had travelled to the affected area in China. The London university student initially tested negative for the virus, but a subsequent test at the national lab in Winnipeg was positive. Health officials say her symptoms are minor.Feb. 4, 2020: Health officials announce another presumptive confirmed case in B.C. Henry says the woman had family visiting from China's Hubei province and she is in isolation at her home.Feb. 5, 2020: British Columbia's second case of coronavirus is confirmed by the National Microbiology Lab.Feb. 6, 2020: Henry announces two new cases of COVID-19 in B.C., noting both people were in the same household as the woman diagnosed with the province's second case.Feb. 12, 2020: Ontario health officials say the woman from London, Ont., no longer has the novel coronavirus in her system. It marks the first time a case of the illness has been resolved in Canada.Feb. 14, 2020: Officials in B.C. announce the province's fifth case of COVID-19. The woman in her 30s who lives in B.C.'s Interior recently returned from Hubei province.Feb. 19, 2020: Henry announces that the person diagnosed with B.C.'s first case of the new coronavirus has recovered. It's the first time this has happened in the province.Feb. 20, 2020: A woman who recently returned from Iran is diagnosed with British Columbia's sixth case of COVID-19. She's the first person in the country diagnosed with the illness who did not recently visit China. Meanwhile, in Ontario, the man who had Canada's first case of the virus is cleared after testing negative for the illness twice in 24 hours.Feb. 21, 2020: The last known case of coronavirus in Ontario is resolved.Feb. 23, 2020: Officials in Toronto announce Ontario has a new case of coronavirus — the fourth to be diagnosed in the province. The woman arrived in Toronto from China several days earlier.Feb. 24, 2020: Henry announces a seventh person in B.C. has been diagnosed with the new coronavirus. The man in his 40s was in close contact with the woman who has the province's sixth case of the illness.Feb. 26, 2020: Ontario officials announce a fifth diagnosis in the province: a woman in her 60s who recently travelled to Iran.Feb. 27, 2020: Quebec public health officials report the province's first presumptive case, a woman from the Montreal region who recently returned from Iran. Ontario officials also confirm a sixth case of COVID-19 in the province. They say the man in his 60s is the husband of Ontario's fifth patient with the virus.This report by The Canadian Press was first published Feb. 27, 2020.The Canadian Press

  • 'Finer focus on job creation:' Alberta government files red-ink budget
    News
    The Canadian Press

    'Finer focus on job creation:' Alberta government files red-ink budget

    EDMONTON — The Alberta budget is counting on oil and gas bouncing back while recognizing it's time to put more money and effort into areas such as high-tech and tourism.But with a bottom line still deep in the red, Premier Jason Kenney's government continues to hold the line on program spending while pursuing job, benefit and salary cuts from thousands of public-sector workers."We recognize that our unemployment rate remains stubbornly high in this province," Finance Minister Travis Toews told a news conference Thursday before introducing the 2020-21 budget in the legislature."While we've had a jobs focus from Day 1 as a government, we will be putting an even finer focus on job creation going forward."The budget projects a deficit of $6.8 billion on revenues of $50 billion. Debt is expected to rise to almost $77 billion by spring 2021 and to almost $88 billion by 2023.It predicts better times ahead in the oil sector as pipeline projects come on line and exports increase. Natural resource revenue, about 10 per cent of total income, is expected to grow by 15 per cent by 2022-23.The budget forecasts the oil benchmark West Texas Intermediate to average US$58 a barrel in the upcoming year. It is currently hovering at about $50 due mainly to the novel coronavirus outbreak that is reducing demand in China."We are not predicting a boom time in the next two years. These projections I believe are credible, but they're cautious," said Toews.It's a government in need of good news.Kenney's United Conservatives were elected last April on a promise to focus on oil and gas and bring jobs back to Alberta by reducing the corporate income tax rate and red tape.But since last June, 50,000 full-time jobs have been lost. The unemployment rate was 6.9 per cent in 2019 and is forecast to be 6.7 per cent this year. The province is aiming for five per cent.Kenney has been criticized for scrapping targeted tax incentives brought in by the previous NDP government to lure high-tech startups.To counter that, the budget's signal feature is what's being called a "Blueprint for Jobs." Its centrepiece is $200 million to support research and innovation, and to attract talent in areas such as artificial intelligence, aviation, tourism and financial tech.On the expense side, the government continues to follow the advice of a third-party panel chaired by former Saskatchewan finance minister Janice MacKinnon. The panel found that Alberta is paying more and getting less in return for its public services. It urged streamlining and reform, rather than tax increases, as the best way to balance the books while not compromising service.To that end, the budget maintains operational funding at current levels for core services: $8.2 billion for kindergarten to Grade 12 education and $20.6 billion for health.The Opposition NDP has said that when population growth, inflation and other factors are weighed in, those numbers represent significant cuts affecting front-line workers and forcing families to pay more for services such as school busing.NDP Leader Rachel Notley disparaged the budget as a plan for more public sector cuts and service fee hikes underpinned by unattainable growth projections that are out of step with private sector forecasts."While families scramble to make ends meet, Jason Kenney's plan is to pile public sector job losses on top of private sector job losses," said Notley."He refuses to accept that his economic plan has failed. And instead of reversing course, he is doubling down."Albertans will pay more. Much more."The government is forecasting it will spend $26.7 billion on public-sector compensation with continued tight controls on salaries and compensation. Full-time equivalent jobs are expected to drop by 1,436 this year, mainly through attrition.Guy Smith, head of the Alberta Union of Provincial Employees, said the budget is more fuel for the smouldering dispute between its members and the government."I thought this government was about creating and supporting jobs, and all we're seeing is job losses in the frontlines of the public service," said Smith."Albertans are going to notice it when they try to get services from the province."Funding for compensation to doctors is to remain stable at $5.4 billion, but the Alberta Medical Association says coming changes to billing will be devastating to many rural and family practices.The government still plans to have the budget balanced before the end of its mandate.It is forecasting a $700-million surplus in 2022-23.This report by The Canadian Press was first published Feb. 27, 2020Dean Bennett, The Canadian Press

  • News
    CBC

    OPP logged 194 collisions in southwestern Ontario during latest winter storm

    Ontario Provincial Police logged 194 collisions in southwestern Ontario between 6 p.m. Wednesday and 9:30 a.m. Thursday morning. Among those 194 were seven tractor trailer collisions and three motor vehicle collisions along Highway 401 in Chatham-Kent.Despite the high volume of accidents on the 401 in that region, Chatham-Kent OPP Const. Shawn Eagan said there were no reported injuries. "The vehicles are just ending up into the ditch, some of them into the guardrail," he said. "So no collisions between vehicles, just themselves going into the ditch."Eagan said there were still four tractor trailers that need to be cleared, with two jackknifed in a median and two in a ditch, as of 11 a.m."The highway still has a lot of snow blowing across," he said. "If there is an area where it's safe [to clear the vehicles], we will."Poor conditions on secondary roads have also prevented OPP from shutting down sections of the highway to clear "a couple of the tractor trailers," Eagan said. According to an OPP tweet, police usually log 20 accidents on a "typical night."OPP told drivers to expect winter driving conditions throughout Thursday and Friday."Hopefully everyone can slow down, take their time, and drive to conditions," said Eagan.Environment Canada forecasted a mix of sun and cloud with a 40 per cent chance of flurries in the region on Thursday.On Friday, Environment Canada predicts a mix of sun and cloud, with a 60 per cent chance of flurries.

  • Hudson's Bay Co secures shareholder approval to become a private company
    News
    Reuters

    Hudson's Bay Co secures shareholder approval to become a private company

    Saks Fifth Avenue owner Hudson's Bay Co said on Thursday it won shareholders' approval to become a private company in a C$2 billion deal proposed by Chairman Richard Baker. Baker and his partners had been in a tussle with the department store operator's top shareholders over the deal. The retail mogul fell short in an earlier vote to approve his take-private quest last year, Reuters reported, but later won the support of a significant shareholder after bumping the offer price to C$11 per share.

  • Review:  `Strung Out' is a window into world of addiction
    News
    The Canadian Press

    Review: `Strung Out' is a window into world of addiction

    “Strung Out: One Last Hit and Other Lies That Nearly Killed Me: A Memoir,” Park Row, by Erin KharA 13-year-old girl in Los Angeles started using opioids she steals from a family member’s medicine cabinet.Then she was bold enough to try heroin. Heroin changed her world.This is the premise of Erin Khar’s new memoir, “Strung Out: One Last Hit and Other Lies That Nearly Killed Me.”As a child, Khar gets hooked and hits rock bottom. She struggles with an addiction that waxes and wanes over a 15-year period - while she’s a student in college, working and navigating relationships.There are plenty of addiction memoirs on the market, but Khar’s book tells the story of a privileged girl growing up with a circle of friends and taking horseback riding lessons. Though her parents are divorced and slightly aloof, from the outside she seems to have it all. The book is Khar’s reflection on how we, as a society, have preconceived notions of addiction that are fallible.“The stigma associated with opioids, with heroin, with ‘being a junkie,’ prevents people from reaching out,” she writes. “Americans are stuck in a spiral of shame, and that shame drives the vicious cycle of relapse that many drug users get caught in.”The author writes eloquently about heavy ideas. When Khar describes her own cycles of relapses and getting clean is particularly insightful and fascinating.“Strung Out” is a window into the world of addiction - a world that makes headlines daily. The reader will likely come away with a clear understanding and empathy for the power that drugs like opioids and heroin have over their victims.Tracee M. Herbaugh, The Associated Press

  • TSX shut down for 'technical halt' as stock markets sell off
    News
    CBC

    TSX shut down for 'technical halt' as stock markets sell off

    The company that owns and operates the Toronto Stock Exchange ordered a "technical halt" to all trading on Canada's largest stock exchange on Thursday, a day when stock markets around the world saw heavy losses.TMX Corp. ordered the halt a little before 2 p.m. ET on Thursday, citing a "problem with order entry" on the main index, the TSX Venture Exchange and the alternative Alpha Exchange. The outage appears to have also affected the Montreal Exchange, which processes derivatives such as stock options and commodity futures contracts.About an hour after the halt was implemented, TMX said the shutdown will be in place for at least the rest of the trading day.Order entry refers to the manner in which buy and sell orders are processed into the system.The halt means that traders "are currently unable to enter, modify or cancel open orders," TMX told CBC News in an email.TMX confirmed that its systems are ready for the start of business on Friday, according to a press release issued late Thursday. This is a market that's being driven completely by fear \- Elaine Stokes, portfolio managerPrior to the complete trading halt, the TSX was down by 324 points, or almost two per cent, after having earlier been down by as much as 585 points on the day. Before the shutdown 232,685,915 shares had changed hands on the TSX on Thursday, a higher volume than one would normally see on a typical trading day.It's been anything but typical trading on stock markets of late, as the TSX — like many other exchanges — has sold off for the last five consecutive days as fears over the coronavirus have infected investor sentiment around the world. The TSX had lost almost seven per cent of its value in the past week, prior to the halt.U.S. stock groupings such as the Dow Jones Industrial Average, The Nasdaq and the S&P 500 are all off more than 10 per cent in the past week on the same fears. The Dow lost more than 1,000 points for the second time in a week on Thursday, closing down 1,190 points to 25,766. That's a loss of more than four per cent. The broader S&P 500 and technology-focused Nasdaq both closed down by more than four per cent, too."This is a market that's being driven completely by fear," said Elaine Stokes, portfolio manager at Loomis Sayles. "Eventually we're going to get to a place where this fear, it's something that we get used to living with, the same way we got used to living with the threat of living with terrorism," she said of coronavirus fears. "But right now, people don't know how or when we're going to get there, and what people do in that situation is to retrench."'Very embarrassing'That broad market sell-off is why Barry Schwartz, chief investment officer with Baskin Financial in Toronto, says the technical glitch is particularly ill-timed."We are in a market panic right now and the TSX isn't open," he said in an interview. "It's obviously very embarrassing."Schwartz says the last time something like this happened on the TSX was in 2018, when the market shut itself down two hours early on a Friday, leaving investors in a lurch through the weekend. "Hopefully it's back in business at 9:30 tomorrow so people can continue their selling," Schwartz joked.

  • News
    CBC

    Bell times to change at 131 Toronto public schools in September

    Start and end times for the day will be different at nearly a quarter of Toronto public schools this September.The Toronto District School Board says staggered days at 131 schools will help it to plan bus routes more efficiently, in turn saving it some $2.5 million throughout the academic year.The full list of schools that will be affected can be found here."We understand that this may be a change to your family's routine," the board said in a letter sent out to families this week."However, if we did not reduce transportation costs by staggering school start and end times, we would have to reduce other services and supports to students that would have more direct and negative impact on classroom teaching."The changes, first approved last June as part of the 2019 budget, will remove about 55 buses from student transportation routes, the board added.Students will continue to be supervised for 15 minutes before the morning bell and 15 minutes after the afternoon bell.TDSB will be holding in-person sessions in Scarborough, Etobicoke and North York to provide additional information to parents and guardians.

  • Ornge sounds alarm after helicopter pilot hit in the eye with laser
    News
    CBC

    Ornge sounds alarm after helicopter pilot hit in the eye with laser

    Provincial air ambulance service Ornge is pleading with Ontarians to stop shining lasers at its helicopters, after a pilot was struck in the eye with beam of light earlier this month."It's a very serious issue, and it's one that needs to be addressed. It potentially could have very negative consequences if we ever had an accident," said Greg Hulme, standards pilot for Ornge.The incident happened at around 8:50 p.m. on Feb. 15. That's when an Ornge aircraft was en route to Billy Bishop Airport after finishing a call at SickKids when someone started shining a green laser at the helicopter.Ornge says the pilot was struck in the eye, and later needed to be evaluated by a doctor. Hulme told CBC News that the pilot was OK in the end. Ornge then filed a report with Toronto police and Transport Canada.Compounding the issue, Hulme says, is a surge in this activity. Ornge has dealt with five laser strikes already this year, compared to three throughout all of last year."Our worry is those numbers are going to spike when the warmer weather comes," Hulme told CBC News.WATCH: Laser strikes Ornge helicopter in TorontoHe said people need to realize how dangerous doing this can be."Everything about critical care transport is all about time — the time to get to the scene, the time to transport the patient to the trauma centre. If an aircraft has to overshoot a landing onto one of the downtown hospital landing pads, it can add minutes one to the delivery of that patient," he said."It could be the difference between life and death when minutes count."adam.carter@cbc.ca

  • Kids shine as Broadway's 'To Kill a Mockingbird' goes big
    News
    The Canadian Press

    Kids shine as Broadway's 'To Kill a Mockingbird' goes big

    NEW YORK — The cast of “To Kill a Mockingbird” ditched its sombre Broadway home Wednesday for the cavernous Madison Square Garden, performing the play for 18,000 school kids in an electric one-time-only performance that one actor called “primal.”It marks the first time a Broadway play has been performed at the venue nicknamed “The World’s Most Famous Arena,” which is home to the New York Knicks and Rangers. The last line of the play is “All rise” and the students did exactly that, giving it a standing ovation and a hearty thank you.“I loved the book in middle school when I read it and seeing it live and seeing the characters come to life, it's so much more real,” said Alissa DiCristo, 17. “It makes you feel so much more.”The play's usual Broadway home is the 1,435-seat Shubert Theatre, where it's routinely sold out. But thousands of middle and high school students from all five boroughs got to see it for free, courtesy of the Scott Rudin-led production and James L. Dolan, executive chairman and CEO of The Madison Square Garden Company. The tickets were distributed by the city's education department. Free popcorn and bottles of water were also offered on the way out.The audience this time surrounded the stage and, in the moments before the play, started using the flashlight feature on their phones to make patterns and signals, turning the Garden into a tapestry of lights, like a forest ignited with fireflies.As the play progressed, the students clapped, booed, cheered and gasped, even erupting in the same pitched excitement as a buzzer-beating 3-point basket when the stately Atticus Finch wrestled with the evil Bob Ewell. At other times, the Garden was completely silent as it felt like 18,000 young people held their breaths, particularly during courtroom scenes.“We did say how we feel and each and everyone was respectful, too, when they needed to,” said 17-year-old Eric Meza, who had his first experience with a Broadway show. “It was just an amazing experience.”"To Kill a Mockingbird” by Harper Lee won a Pulitzer Prize in 1961 and has been widely praised as a sensitive portrait of racial tension in 1930s Alabama. At its core is Finch, a lawyer called upon to defend a black man falsely accused of raping a white woman.Oscar-winning screenwriter Aaron Sorkin adapted Lee's play and it crackles with current issues: institutional racism, a flawed criminal justice system, police misconduct, sexual assault and standing against evil. Ripples of anger coursed through the crowd when racial epithets were used.“I feel like it targeted a lot of prominent issues in today's society and it really did speak to me,” said Ambria Creary, 17. “Definitely there were parts where you had to react because it hurt so bad to even imagine it happening today.”The entire current Broadway cast performed the show, led by Ed Harris as Finch. They practiced for the Garden show in a warehouse in Long Island City, preparing to work on their new space, a stage measuring 90 feet in length by 40 feet in width.Despite the size, the actors kept the experience intimate, rolling pieces of equipment onstage and helping put away props. Some, when not onstage, sat in chairs or a bench waiting their cues. At one point, Nick Robinson, who played Jem, gave Lisa Gay Hamilton, who played Calpurnia, a gentle hug after a powerful scene.“It was magical. It felt like what theatre used to like be thousands of years ago,” said actor Taylor Trensch, who played Dill Harris. "It's something I'll remember forever."Mayor Bill de Blasio and city first lady Chirlane McCray introduced the show, urging the students to think about the themes of the play and urging them to embrace the arts. “You are part of history today,” McCray said. Director Spike Lee, a die-hard Knicks fan, said: “Don't let anyone tell you you can't be artists. Follow your dreams.”While Sorkin's script wasn't altered, the staging had to adapt to the hulking space. Eight cameras captured the action and beamed it onto four massive screens so everyone could see small details.The stage arrived in about 100 pieces and took four hours in install, including the jury box, which remains empty throughout, a signal that the audience also is complicit in the trial. On Wednesday, director Bartlett Sher paced along one side of the stage during the performance, helping actors with their sound equipment and cheering them on.Trensch thought back to his own youth and didn't initially know if the three-hour play would capture the attention of the children. He needn't have worried.“It was almost primal,” he said. “There was like an electrical charge in the air that you don't get at the Shubert Theatre.”___Mark Kennedy is at http://twitter.com/KennedyTwitsMark Kennedy, The Associated Press

  • Ottawa imposes new rules to protect fragile population of right whales
    Global News

    Ottawa imposes new rules to protect fragile population of right whales

    Federal officials say their updated measures to protect critically endangered North Atlantic right whales won't lead to more fishing closures in Canadian waters. The whales will be moving into their summer feeding grounds soon in the Gulf of St. Lawrence or the Bay of Fundy. There are only about 400 of these whales left, and Fisheries Minister Bernadette Jordan says the new rules are aimed at reducing the main causes of death -- ship strikes and fishing gear entanglements.

  • Zoe the dog returns home after being lost in the woods for nearly a year
    News
    CBC

    Zoe the dog returns home after being lost in the woods for nearly a year

    After nearly a year on her own in the wilderness, Zoe the dog is finally home in Bay Roberts. According to a Facebook group dedicated to rescuing her, the yellow Labrador mix wandered into a trap set by her search team early Wednesday morning. "Last night was a night unlike any other. It will go down in the books as one that will NEVER be forgotten. We are completely overjoyed and appreciative to have our girl Zoe HOME WITH US!!" wrote owner Rebecca Curlew in a post to the group Wednesday morning.Zoe escaped from a backyard near Brigus Junction last April. That means she survived freezing temperatures, countless rain and snowstorms — even Snowmageddon — on her own for months on the Avalon Peninsula.Her owners thought she was dead, until a homeowner caught her on video, foraging for food in the middle of the night on his property. In November that video launched a massive search effort for the dog, which finally came to an end this week.Curlew said it didn't take long for Zoe to let her guard down with owner Peter Vaters, and head home."After Zoe had sniffed Peter's hand and had calmed down slightly, Peter slowly entered the cage.… He was able to coax her as he gradually got nearer and nearer," Curlew wrote. "After speaking with a vet, we felt it to be best to bring her home for the time being.… She did not have any major open wounds or injuries [and] the vet felt it would be best to give her time to calm down and adjust."Welcome home, ZoeZoe's story launched an remarkable online community and search effort. On Wednesday, the Facebook group called "Help find Zoe" — which has more than 10,000 members — changed its name to "Welcome home, Zoe.""We have no idea what the next few days will bring, but rest assured that we will be doing absolutely anything that we can to readjust her to our home. This has been a long time coming," Curlew wrote.Read more from CBC Newfoundland and Labrador

  • News
    CBC

    New program launched to help newcomer women enter P.E.I.'s workforce

    A new program helping newcomer women in P.E.I. join the workforce is launching in Charlottetown and Summerside next month. The first group for the Newcomer Work Ready program will run for four months and is being delivered by the Confederation Group. The program is funded by the federal government and managed by Skills PEI."Sometimes it's harder for women to manage the obligations that they have been encumbered with at home and still enter the workforce," said Confederation Group President Blake Doyle."We want to give them the tools and the confidence so they're empowered to get into the market and achieve their goals."The program is designed for women who either have had professional experience and want to get back to work, or women who are interested in working for the first time, Doyle said. "For me, the opportunity is how do you get people from a foreign environment, transplant them into P.E.I., adapt to this culture, and then participate and thrive in our labour market," he said. "Our labour market needs more participation."'Engaged, employed and participating'The curriculum developed by the Confederation Group will feature English as a Second Language training, tours to familiarize participants with the P.E.I. labour market as well as guest presenters, including other immigrant women who have been successful working in the province.The program will help participants establish contacts in different industries and businesses, and, ideally, secure work placements that fit their interests, abilities and skills.Doyle said the program has received a good response to date, but the more interested women the better."The ultimate goal is to make sure people are engaged, employed and participating in the labour market," said Doyle.The program is now looking to fill spots for groups in Charlottetown and Summerside before beginning in late March.More from CBC P.E.I.

  • News
    CBC

    Regina Folk Festival says it has 'parted ways' with longtime director and CEO Sandra Butel

    The president of the Regina Folk Festival says the organization has "parted ways" with longtime festival artistic director and CEO Sandra Butel."We will not be discussing personnel matters at this time," said president Melissa Biro in an emailed statement. Biro would not confirm when the festival "parted ways" with Butel or anything further, aside from saying planning for the 2020 festival continues.Last summer, the festival celebrated its 50th anniversary in Victoria Park. At the time, Butel said "It really feels like a touching tribute to 50 years of volunteers and community...I'm feeling it more right now than I ever have."CBC News was unable to reach Butel at the time of publication.Gerry Ruecker, who was secretary on the RFF board of directors, resigned the position recently."I have been proud to have served this organization for the past 15 or so years, and I wish it nothing but the best in the future," Ruecker wrote in a public social media post on Feb. 21, 2020.He declined to comment further. It's not clear if his departure is connected to Butel's.Biro also declined to comment on Ruecker's departure, saying "he can speak for himself."

  • News
    CBC

    P.E.I. teacher keeping up lessons with quarantined students in China

    A P.E.I. woman teaching English in China is facing new challenges as she continues to teach her Grade 2 students from Portugal.Annie Ladéroute was on holiday in Spain when the COVID-19 outbreak in China grew to the point that her students were quarantined, and she was told it was not safe for her to return. Ladéroute teaches at the International School of Nanshan Shenzhen, in Guangdong province in China.She and her partner, who also teaches at the school and is from P.E.I., settled in Portugal to ride out the quarantine, and in the meantime are teaching their students online."For the most part things are going pretty well. I mean we're safe. We're in a beautiful country," said Ladéroute."There's not much for us to really complain on that front but there's a lot of stress in terms of the limbo of it all. So we just don't know when we're going back to our normal life, and teaching Grade 2 students online is certainly not ideal."Changing plansLadéroute is meeting with her students in small groups via video conference through the day, and they've been doing assignments online. They have been quarantined in their homes for several weeks, and only recently allowed to spend some time outside. They are quarantining people and that's making me a little more nervous. — Annie LadérouteLadéroute has continued to be paid, but is not receiving any money for the extra expenses she is facing living in Portugal. The school is currently scheduled to reopen March 23, but there is nothing certain about that."Plans have changed multiple times over, in terms of how we might make up school time and how to better support our students," she said."We've had to change our flight two times now."Ladéroute said the coronavirus itself is not a particular concern to her when it comes to returning to China."I'm not sure that I'm so concerned about my health, more so than maybe perhaps being stuck in China if I return," she said."It seems like they are quarantining people and that's making me a little bit more nervous than the actual virus itself, which sounds more like a flu."The school has already announced longer class-time hours every day when it reopens, but Ladéroute is hopeful with the online work she doing now, the school year will not have to be extended.More P.E.I. news

  • Sheep farmers join forces to bring lamb to the tables of Canadians
    News
    CBC

    Sheep farmers join forces to bring lamb to the tables of Canadians

    Demand for lamb products is expanding across Canada, and a new collective of farmers is hoping to grow the sheep farming industry to meet it.There is a huge potential for growth, Ryan Greir, chair of both Alberta Lamb Producers and the National Sheep Network, told the Calgary Eyeopener."Lamb demand in Canada is growing," he said, "This growth is spurred by consumers being adventurous in cooking, and the growing Canadian population. But the largest growth is in the new Canadian and ethnic population."Greir is part of a group of Canadian sheep producers who have strayed from the herd and left the Canadian Sheep Federation. They created the National Sheep Network, which is made up of producers in Alberta, Ontario and Quebec, and hope to find new ways to promote their industry."So those three provinces chose to form together to work on issues that are important to our provinces and to our producers," Greir said. "We chose to focus on business risk management, traceability, animal health and welfare and market intelligence."Greir says the group is also going to work on finding ways to lobby the federal government for help in promoting and growing the industry.One of the biggest challenges is our climate. Canadian farmers have to compete with lamb imported from warmer climates, and winter lambing requires extra infrastructure."It's mainly the seasonality, and that's one of our obstacles," Greir said. "So the seasonality of our product being north of the 49th parallel, our product is impacted by cold weather and in some cases long winters. So New Zealand and Australia have an advantage of producing at a different season than we do, and they utilize that to bring lamb in when we're typically seeing a shortage."Greir says under the old system, there just wasn't a structure in place to support it. Frustrated with the status quo, the group broke free."Different provinces left for different reasons, so it was essentially a vote of non-confidence with the current structure. And together we formed this organization," Greir said. "We feel that using proper governance and using our own resources to bring forward the ideas, and be that national voice for the business of sheep farming, is important to us."Collectively, the group is responsible for 70 per cent of Canada's sheep production, and owns 72 per cent of Canada's ewe flock.Greir says it's time to work on getting away from the seasonality of the farming, access global markets, and eventually bring Canadian prices down for consumers of Canadian product, which is often priced higher than imports."In terms of scalability, I think as we improve our methods and as we improve our ability to produce sheep out of season, we'll become more and more competitive in that marketplace."With files from the Calgary Eyeopener.

  • Ottawa's LRT line leaves thousands out in the cold during heavy snowstorm
    News
    The Canadian Press

    Ottawa's LRT line leaves thousands out in the cold during heavy snowstorm

    OTTAWA — Many transit riders in Ottawa were left out in the cold during a heavy snowstorm after serious power issues on the city's light-rail system slowed service to a snail's pace Thursday.The system needs 13 trains to run at full service but at some points during the morning rush hour only six were working — leaving thousands of passengers with a long and crowded commute.The breakdowns, which started Wednesday evening, meant some transit riders had to leave the trains and walk on the tracks to the nearest stations."We don't want evacuations, we don't want to have people walk on the track, in the tunnel," said the city's transit manager, John Manconi. "We're not happy that we're doing that."Ottawa's LRT system has been plagued since full service began last October, hindered by issue after issue with the trains themselves and overhead wires.Rideau Transit Group (RTG) CEO Peter Lauch denied the winter storm had anything to do with the latest problems.He pointed to a damaged power line and ongoing issues with the train's power inductors, which often fail when exposed to the elements.RTG has been installing covers for the inductors and the ones that are protected are working well, Lauch said. But so far, only 19 of the line's 34 light-rail cars have been retrofitted (two cars make up one train).Ottawa is the first city to use this particular version of Alstom's low-floor Citadis Spirit train model. Problems with the trains, including door jams and other mechanical failures, were one of the reasons the project launched more than a year behind schedule last fall.The ongoing problems have attracted attention from outside the capital from cities eyeing similar LRT systems, or, in the case of Metrolinx in the Toronto area, purchasing the same cars.Some city councillors have called for the trains to be replaced with a more reliable model, but Lauch said despite the ongoing breakdowns, the trains are "good" and can provide service. Every time RTG develops a new solution to work around the issues, the train design is modified for new customers.But he admitted that's "cold comfort" for the train-riding public in Ottawa.Ottawa's LRT was designed to reduce emissions by replacing hundreds of buses from the downtown transit corridor. But for about a month, the city has had to run bus service parallel to the line to make up for the unreliable service.Ontario NDP transit critic Jessica Bell raised the ongoing issues with Ottawa's LRT system in the legislature Thursday and asked the premier to put a moratorium on public-private partnerships until projects that have experienced problems are reviewed.She also noted Toronto's Eglinton Crosstown light-rail project, which is now expected to be completed about a year behind schedule. Premier Doug Ford responded that public-private partnerships in Ontario have a good track record of being on time and on budget, and questioned why Bell doesn't want transit built in the province.This report by The Canadian Press was first published Feb. 27, 2020.The Canadian Press

  • Fredericton man gets 100 days in jail for practising law without licence
    News
    CBC

    Fredericton man gets 100 days in jail for practising law without licence

    A Fredericton man who describes himself as a social activist is going to jail for what a senior judge says is practising law without a licence.Vaughn Barnett was found in contempt of court Thursday morning for showing "a flagrant lack of respect" for a previous court order that he stop providing legal advice to people and representing them in legal disputes.Court of Queen's Bench Chief Justice Tracey DeWare sentenced him to 100 days in jail, dismissing Barnett's argument that if he breached the two-decade-old order, he did so by mistake."The respondent is an extremely intelligent man," she wrote in her decision. "He is fully aware of the scope and nature of the court order in place and, in my view, there is no ambiguity in the wording of the injunction order."The New Brunswick Law Society applied for the contempt finding, arguing that by not being a member of the society, Barnett was not required to have insurance, was not subject to a complaint procedure and could not be disciplined — a risk to the people he helps.DeWare accepted those arguments, saying the society's requirements exist to protect the public. What we need instead of a private club like this one ... is a public justice system where the people have free access, so you can get the justice you deserve, not the justice you can buy. \- Dan Weston, anti-poverty activist"The respondent is not a criminal, nor is he dangerous in the sense that society needs to have him behind bars in order to protect his fellow citizens from physical harm," she wrote."However, the respondent's insistence on engaging in the practice of law does endanger individuals whom he is ostensibly assisting. … His ability to do harm through the unlicensed practice of law is real, and, regretfully, unrelenting." Moments after DeWare sentenced Barnett, a court sheriff took him into custody. Several supporters in the courtroom called out to him with words of encouragement.One of them passed the sheriff a packed bag that Barnett brought to court in anticipation of going to jail.Barnett argued at a January hearing that he was a community activist who helps low-income people by providing them with alternative dispute resolution services, but not legal advice. He said if he had crossed the line, it was by mistake.'A secular saint'Outside the courthouse, the supporters told reporters that Barnett represented an option for people who can't afford to hire lawyers."What we need instead of a private club like this one — if you haven't got the money, you can't take part — is a public justice system where the people have free access, so you can get the justice you deserve, not the justice you can buy," said anti-poverty activist Dan Weston.Robert MacKay noted that judicial officials, including former Supreme Court of Canada Chief Justice Beverley McLachlin, have called for better access to justice. He called Barnett "a secular saint" and added, "I just think it's crappy what happened today."Fredericton historian Melynda Jarratt said she has known Barnett for 30 years and "if he says that he did not mean to contravene the order, I believe him."But law society executive director Marc Richard said the decision was justified. "It's not an easy situation," he said. "We have to do our job, which is the protection of the public." Richard said the society has a committee including Department of Justice and court officials to improve access to justice, but someone like Barnett "has to respect the court order, the system that's in place." Barnett's historyBarnett has a law degree but has never been licensed to practise law. In 2000 the society obtained an injunction ordering Barnett to stop practising, a decision later upheld by the New Brunswick Court of Appeal.In 2007 a Court of Queen's Bench judge sent him to jail for 10 days for violating that order. He also amended the order by requiring Barnett add to any written reference he made to his law degree the disclaimer "not licensed to practice law" in type twice as large.This year's case sprang from two new examples of Barnett doing what the society considered legal work. In one case, he acted as what he called a "legal researcher and advocate" for Wendy Wetteland, who was suspended from her job as president and chief of the New Brunswick Aboriginal Peoples' Council. In that case, DeWare ruled, Barnett asked for disclosure of the evidence against her and to attend a hearing with her, referred to her as his "client" and asked the organization's lawyer for "the legal justification" for her suspension.In the second case, the society said, he tried to negotiate with the New Brunswick Labour and Employment Board on behalf of his friend Gina Persaud, and did not use the required "not licensed to practice law" disclaimer.He also described himself as Persaud's "legal advisor" and tried to negotiate the terms of her arrest with a Fredericton police detective.

  • News
    CBC

    Earth has captured a new mini-moon

    Earth has a tiny new companion in its journey around the sun — at least for now.The new "mini-moon" is an asteroid called 2020 CD3. It's about 1.9 to 3.5 metres in diameter, roughly between the size of a cow and a hippopotamus.It was confirmed to have been captured and "temporarily bound to Earth" by the International Astronomical Union's Minor Planet Centre at the Smithsonian Astronomical Observatory on Tuesday. The organization is responsible for the designation of minor bodies in the solar system.The asteroid was discovered by Kacper Wierzchos and Theodore Prune, astronomers with the Catalina Sky Survey, on Feb. 15, Wierzchos said in a tweet that described it as "big news."The Catalina Sky Survey is a NASA-funded project based at the University of Arizona that catalogues potentially hazardous asteroids."It's a big deal as out of ~1 million known asteroids, this is just the second asteroid known to orbit Earth," Wierzchos said.The first was 2006 RH120, also found by the Catalina Sky Survey, which most recently orbited Earth between Sept. 2006 and June 2007. It has since resumed orbiting the sun.The reason mini-moons orbit Earth for such a short time — compared to the moon, which has been orbiting Earth for more than four billion years — is that they're pulled by the Earth's, the moon's and the sun's gravity at the same time, producing irregular orbits.At some point, the sun's gravity will win, and the object will break free from its orbit around Earth.However, so far, astronomers estimate that 2020 CD3 has already been orbiting the Earth for about three years.Even though mini-moons are rarely discovered, a University of Hawaii study in 2011 calculated that there should be at least one asteroid with a diameter of at least one metre orbiting Earth at any given time. On average, such a mini-moon would orbit Earth for nine months, but some could orbit for decades, it estimated.

  • Season-long fishing closures possible under new protections for endangered whales
    News
    CBC

    Season-long fishing closures possible under new protections for endangered whales

    Further measures have been announced to better protect the endangered North Atlantic right whale, after eight confirmed whale deaths in Canadian waters during last year's fishing season.The federal government has already taken protective steps, such as reducing boat/vessel speeds and altering fishing season dates in the Gulf of St. Lawrence.On Thursday, the Department of Fisheries and Oceans announced more protections in an effort to prevent future entanglements."These new measures build on that work, and are informed by the latest research and technology," said Federal Fisheries Minister Bernadette Jordan in a release."We recognize that they are only possible because of the hard work and cooperation of our fish harvesters who have been changing their operations to support our shared goal of protecting this beautiful animal for generations to come."This year, from April to November, Fisheries and Oceans Canada will be closing fishing in areas of the gulf where whales are gathering in large numbers.If whales are detected in an area of the gulf more than once during a 15-day period, that fishing zone will be closed for fishing until the end of the season on Nov.15. Previously, the zone would be re-opened after 15 days."This means, if a single whale is detected by aerial monitoring or underwater acoustics, a protective area around it of approximately 2,000 square kilometres. or about the size of Ottawa will be closed off," explained Jordan during a press conference."Fish harvesters must remove their fixed gear from the area for a 15 day period. If a whale is detected in that area again during that 15 day period, grids within it will be closed to fishing until November 15th."Temporary fishing closures will also expand further into the Bay of Fundy.Speed restrictions put in place last season will carry over this year, limiting the mandatory speed limit in the western part of the Gulf of St Lawrence to 10 knots.All speed and closure restrictions apply to vessels longer than 13 metres. Failure to comply with the restrictions could result in a penalty of up to $25,000.WATCH: The federal government announced new measures to better protect endangered North Atlantic right whales.Regional, seasonal changes The federal government will also be introducing new restrictions in parts of northern New Brunswick and Cape Breton. This year, there will be a restricted area in the Shediac Valley Area of Interest, a stretch of water about halfway between Lameque Island and Prince Edward Island, which vessels will have to either avoid completely or reduce their speed to eight knots.In the Cabot Strait between Nova Scotia and Newfoundland and Labrador, a new speed restriction of 10 knots will be tested out for parts of the season."That's something completely new," said Transport Minister Marc Garneau during a press conference Thursday. "Of course, all the whales have to come through the Cabot Strait at the beginning or at the end of the season, so this is something that's going to give us a lot of important area information."Ottawa also announced a new ice-breaking contract which would open fishing harbours in northern New Brunswick —Acadian Peninsula, Baie des Chaleurs and Northumberland Strait — earlier in the spring, before the whales' arrival in the gulf. This will ensure the snow crab fishery in the region can get started as early as possible and hopefully avoid contact with the whales altogether.New gear requirementsFisheries will be required to mark their gear this year to identify the country, region and fishery it was used in, in an effort to help trace the gear after an entanglement. The department will also be testing out ropeless fishing gear in closed trials. The government will also be using new technology to better monitor the presence of right whales this season, including aerial drones and an underwater acoustic glider.Underwater microphones (hydrophones) will also be used to detect whales in certain areas.Garneau says they've been testing the use of drones for the past two years.Will it be enough? When asked if the new restrictions will be enough to satisfy the United States, who have recently threatened to put an embargo on Canadian seafood imports, Jordan says she's confident it will."We know the measures we've put in place are very similar to what they have in the US and we continue to work hard with them to make sure we can keep access to the export market," she said.Jordan will be meeting with U.S. counterparts in Boston in the next few weeks to discuss the changes.Activist group Oceana Canada says, while they're happy to see some of the changes they've been advocating for—such as speed limitations in the Cabot Strait and more monitoring—there is still more to be done. "The challenge always is we don't know what's going to be successful...until the season begins," said campaign director Kim Elmslie.Elmslie says the group would like to see speed restrictions in the Cabot Strait be mandatory instead of voluntary.She also would like to see more whale surveillance done by the government."What more is going to be done so that we have as many eyes on the water...as possible?" she said.She says Canada's biggest success in all of this has been its ability to adapt to new whale sightings, which is something she hopes will continue to grow in strength this year. Elmslie says we'll have to wait and see if the changes will be enough to satisfy U.S. officials."The whales don't recognize the boundaries. It's a species on the brink of extinction, so we all need to do as much as we can. The industry on both sides of the border, the government on both sides of the border...we're all in this together."Population fluxThe North Atlantic right whale population stands at around 400, with fewer than 100 breeding females left.In the Gulf of St. Lawrence, around 130 different whales were identified in the past two years, but Fisheries and Oceans Canada said that's likely an underestimate of true population numbers in the gulf. The government believes those numbers are closer to 200.Since 2017, 29 right whales have been killed in Canadian waters, largely through collisions with boats or entanglement in fishing gear.Last year, there were 9 reported right whale fatalities, but one could not be relocated in time for an autopsy.In 2017 alone, 17 right whales died, sparking a national outcry.This year, researchers have already spotted 10 right whale calves.Three calves were spotted off the coasts of Georgia and Florida earlier this month, bringing the total number of endangered right whales born this year above last year's total.During 2019, only seven newborns were spotted, and none were seen in 2018.The last time the number of North Atlantic right whale calves surpassed 10 was in 2016, when 14 calves were spotted.

  • News
    CBC

    Alberta ended 2019 with more job losses and 'mild recession': reports

    Alberta's economy ended 2019 on a sour note, according to two reports released Thursday.Statistics Canada said the number of payroll jobs in the province fell for the fourth straight month, dwindling to 2.029 million in December.That's about 9,000 fewer jobs than in August, which was the high point for the year.The numbers come from the latest Survey of Employment, Payroll and Hours, which measures jobs from a variety of sources, including payroll-tax data. It does not include jobs from self-employment.Meanwhile, the Conference Board of Canada released a report saying Alberta's economy shrunk slightly in 2019, with real GDP contracting by 0.2 per cent compared to the year before."Difficult operating conditions in the energy sector led many oil and gas companies to slash their 2019 spending plans, deleverage debt and focus on shoring up their financial positions," the report reads."The bad news on the energy front was not contained to investment. Oil production was limited under the government-imposed cap, and a number of oilsands facilities suspended operations for maintenance."It all added up to what the Conference Board describes as a "mild recession" in 2019, but one that should be short-lived."Rebounding investment and production in the energy sector is the key factor underpinning the province's economic recovery," the report says, with forecast growth of 2.2 per cent this year and 2.3 per cent next year.The Conference Board cited improvements in midstream companies' pipeline efficiency and the continued raising of the provincial oil-production cap as reasons for the rosier outlook, as well as "bigger milestones" such as the looming replacement of Enbridge's Line 3 pipeline and the Trans Mountain pipeline expansion."This all adds up to more growth opportunities in the oilsands. And the opportunities should continue to improve," the report reads.The report goes on to say that the economic rebound "will be tempered by significant public sector restraint, which will weigh on growth over the next few years.""Where the Alberta outlook is not so bright is in government spending," it reads. "Its public sector is one of the largest employers and sources of job growth in the province. With various departments facing harsh spending cuts, new hires will be limited — and, in some cases, layoffs are imminent."Alberta's 2020 budget was released Thursday afternoon.

  • News
    CBC

    Sask. updates coronavirus recommendations as spread continues elsewhere

    As the COVID-19 coronavirus continues to spread elsewhere, the government of Saskatchewan has added new recommendations in hopes of preventing an outbreak in the province.There still hasn't been a confirmed case in the province and the risk to travellers is low, according to the province.Still, Chief Medical Health Officer Dr. Saqib Shahab said anyone travelling to affected areas should pay close attention to their health for two weeks after travel.If you have travelled to Hubei in the last 14 days: * Self-isolate at home for 14 days after leaving the area. * Actively monitor for symptoms of COVID-19 including cough, fever and difficulty breathing. * Do not go to school, university, work, daycare, sporting or social events or religious gatherings.If you have been in close contact with someone who is ill with COVID-19: * Self-isolate for 14 days from your last contact. * Actively monitor for symptoms.If you have traveled from another affected area in the last 14 days but do not have any symptoms: * Monitor your health for 14 days after leaving the area including taking your temperature twice daily. * If you develop symptoms, call HealthLine 811 for assessment and direction. * If you do not have cough, fever or difficulty breathing, you can go to work or school.If you do not have a travel history to/from an affected area and do not have symptoms of a cough or fever, you can go to work or to school.To protect yourself from respiratory illness: * Wash your hands frequently. * Do not touch surfaces and then your mouth, eyes or nose. * Use tissues when you cough or sneeze and dispose of them immediately. * Stay home if you become ill and prevent the spread of the illness.

  • How did this elderly Alberta man wind up in a ditch, and what happened to his truck?
    News
    CBC

    How did this elderly Alberta man wind up in a ditch, and what happened to his truck?

    An 80-year-old man is recovering in hospital from severe frostbite after spending the night lost in a roadside ditch near the town of Irma, Alta.Family members say Harvey Tessman has no idea what happened to the truck he was driving when he set out on the road.Tessman left his home in Two Hills on Monday morning, planning to drive to Saskatoon to see his son. Less than two hours later, he called his son to say he was turning around and heading home. Early Tuesday morning, he was found lying in a ditch along Highway 881, more than 100 kilometres from home.He was not wearing gloves and suffered severe frostbite to both hands."He's not in very good shape," said his stepdaughter, Rachel Farr. "He will probably lose all of his fingers because of that."The 1994 blue pickup Tessman was driving has not been found.Farr posted a plea on Facebook for help to find the truck. "We're assuming he can't travel very far," she told CBC News in an interview. "He usually uses a cane to walk. We have scoured the countryside up and down. The roads, anywhere near there. We just want to get some answers, and I guess if we find the vehicle we can start from there, maybe."Before the trip, Tessman had no memory problems, his family said, but now can't remember what happened to him or his truck. His keys are also missing.RCMP are looking for the truck and also aren't sure what happened.Farr went to the location where her stepfather was found, just north of Irma."The ditch is quite steep there," she said. "So you can kind of see where he tumbled down into the ditch and then he crawled quite a ways on his hands and knees, until a place where he kind of just rested and quit. Gave up, I guess."Tessman remains in hospital in Viking. His knees were cut from crawling in the ditch and he's covered in bruises. Farr said she wonders if her stepfather could have picked up a hitchhiker and something went wrong. "It's really odd that the vehicle is not near him," Farr said. "He's just physically incapable of walking 15 miles. If it's not near him, then where is it?"The truck is a blue 1994 Chevrolet GMT 400 with licence plate BHV 2061.Anyone with information about the missing truck is asked to contact Viking RCMP.

  • Head of CBC News Jennifer McGuire leaving CBC as part of leadership restructuring
    News
    CBC

    Head of CBC News Jennifer McGuire leaving CBC as part of leadership restructuring

    CBC's editor-in-chief of news, Jennifer McGuire, is stepping down after more than a decade in the role and leaving CBC at the end of this week, the public broadcaster announced Thursday."I have had a long career passionately serving the mission of our public broadcaster in various roles," McGuire said in a note to staff. "And while I love this place, it is time for me to spread my wings and imagine a life outside of the CBC while I am at the height of my skills and while I have some runway left in my career life to do it."As general manager and editor-in-chief of CBC News since May 2009, McGuire has been responsible for English language news content and programming across the public broadcaster's different platforms: radio, television, digital and social.CBC underwent major redevelopment initiatives during her tenure, including the reinvention of CBC Radio 2, the integration of the broadcaster's television, radio and digital news operations, the rebranding of CBC Newsworld into CBC News Network and the revamp of flagship TV newscast The National. "Change and challenge are united," McGuire said. "And I have been on the front end of many challenging, but ultimately important, reinventions."Began CBC career in radioMcGuire began her career at the CBC in radio as an associate producer for the broadcaster's morning radio program in Ottawa. Later, she worked as a TV producer for Foreign Assignment and other shows on CBC Newsworld.Before taking on the role of editor-in-chief, McGuire served as program director and then executive director of CBC Radio, where she helped establish the program development process and lead the creation of shows such as The Current. During her more than 10 years as head of news, the public broadcaster became news itself on account of several controversies, including the Jian Ghomeshi scandal, the "appropriation prize" furor and criticism over on-air CBC journalists giving paid speaking engagements.During that time, she also oversaw CBC's coverage of major news stories and investigations, such as the Ebola outbreak and the missing and murdered Indigenous women and girls investigation."It is not always easy, but we are the most powerful when we lead, whether it is going to Liberia to cover Ebola or digging into why there are no seat belts on school buses [or] our important work around MMIW," McGuire said.Peter Mansbridge, a 50-year veteran of the CBC and anchor of The National from 1988 to June 2017, said McGuire was a different type of head of news than the CBC had had before."She was never one to allow herself to get consumed by the news story of the day," he said. "Instead, she was consumed by keeping CBC News at the front lines of the changing nature of how news is produced and consumed."Her lasting legacy will be how she successfully moved the CBC, and especially CBC News, into the digital age."Leadership restructuringThe news about McGuire's departure came an hour before a staff town hall in which Barbara Williams, CBC's vice-president of English services, outlined a restructuring of its leadership with the goal of integrating different areas within CBC. "CBC is built on a traditional, platform-based model, and while we do have an innovative spirit, it is sometimes encumbered by silos," Williams said in statement following the town hall, held in Toronto and streamed across the country."We need to move to a more audience-centric approach where we are ultimately working together as one CBC."As part of the leadership changes, Williams promoted Susan Marjetti to the newly created position of general manager of news, current affairs and local. Marjetti moves up from her current post as executive director of CBC Radio and audio.Brodie Fenlon, who returned to CBC News in August as executive director and deputy editor-in-chief, will take on the mantle of editor-in-chief as well as executive director of daily news. Cathy Perry, senior director of CBC network talk radio, has been named executive director of current affairs, investigative and long-form journalism.Other changes include a new portfolio for Sally Catto. Currently CBC-TV's general manager of programming, Catto is being promoted to the newly created position of general manager of entertainment, factual and sports.Along with that of McGuire, she also announced the departure of another longtime CBC leader: Fred Mattocks, general manager of local services.