Jade Roper Tolbert Poses with Newborn Son Brooks Nine Days Postpartum in Underwear Selfie

Jen Juneau

Jade Roper Tolbert is showing her appreciation for her body nine days after giving birth to her second child.

In a candid caption on Instagram Wednesday — which she wrote alongside a mirror selfie where she posed in her underwear, holding her newborn son Brooks Easton — the Bachelor in Paradise season 2 winner shared that she was “so thankful” and has “so much respect for [her] body” after the delivery.

“Women’s bodies are seriously phenomenal! It’s taking my uterus more time to return to its normal state this time around, but honestly I have never loved my body more than I have this postpartum,” wrote Jade, 32.

The former reality star welcomed her son in her and husband Tanner Tolbert‘s master closet on July 29, and she revealed in her Wednesday post she is “slowly healing physically” after having “received several stitches.”

“The mental and emotional healing is hard to put a finger on, but I am giving myself grace to process everything,” Jade continued.

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Jade Roper Tolbert/Instagram

RELATED: Why Ashley Iaconetti Is Taking (Some) Responsibility for Jade Roper Tolbert’s “Crazy” Delivery

“But after such an overwhelming labor and delivery, I have so much respect for my body and the journey it’s been on this year to grow and bring this perfect little joy into my life. So in love, so thankful,” Jade ended her caption, adding the hashtags, “#oneweekpostpartum” and “#4thtrimester.”

The new mother of two and her husband, 32, welcomed their second child in an unexpected, “wild” way they couldn’t possibly have been prepared for.

“[Jade’s] water actually broke at 9:16 p.m., as we were actually watching The Bachelorette,” Tanner told PEOPLE last week of the moment they knew it was go time — two weeks before his son’s due date.

“It’s surreal. I’m still having trouble processing it,” the former Bachelor star added of her surprise delivery.

The Tolbert family | Couresy Jade Tolbert

RELATED VIDEO: Hilaria Baldwin Bares (Almost!) All One Day Postpartum: “I Want to Do All That I Can to Normalize a Real Body”

Jade and Tanner are also parents to daughter Emerson “Emmy” Avery, who turns 2 on Aug. 17. And the toddler’s first meeting with her little brother was one for the books.

In a clip Jade posted to her Instagram feed and story on Thursday, the little girl climbed right up into her mom’s hospital bed and scooted up next to her, marveling at her newborn sibling.

“Here comes your baby brother. Can you say hi?” Tanner could be heard saying from behind the camera.

Emmy talked sweetly about the newest family member in a quiet voice after Jade encouraged her to “be gentle,” before leaning down to give him a kiss on the forehead and rubbing his head softly.

  • Prince Harry might be looking for a job when he comes to Canada. Here are some options
    News
    CBC

    Prince Harry might be looking for a job when he comes to Canada. Here are some options

    With the announcement on Saturday that Prince Harry and Meghan will no longer be working members of the Royal Family — and therefore no longer receiving money from the public purse — the couple may be looking for work when they eventually arrive in Canada.While Meghan Markle could go back to being an actor — she recently signed a deal with Disney for voiceovers — Harry has spent time in the military, having served two tours in Afghanistan, but he hasn't really forged a career.B.C. Premier John Horgan has already joked if they end up in his province, "I'm sure I could  find something for Harry to do."However, there are some restrictions, said Andrew Heard, a political science professor at Simon Fraser University whose research has specialized in Canadian constitutional issues and the Crown.One of the main restrictions on both of them is that they cannot be in a position where there is a reasonable perception that they, or any potential employers, might be taking advantage of the royal connection, Heard said."Even if they step back from most formal events, they will still remain members of the Royal Family and any future careers cannot appear to trade on that prestigious connection or imply privileged access to political and business elites."WATCH: Prince Harry saddened to step back, but wants 'more peaceful life'Other royals have taken on private sector jobs, although not always with successful results. Prince Edward, the youngest son of Queen Elizabeth, launched a TV production firm in 1993 that failed in 2011 after years of mediocre performance. His wife, Sophie, tried to keep her established public relations firm going after she married Edward in 1999, but she was embarrassed two years later by an undercover reporter pretending to be a wealthy sheikh interested in doing business with her firm. In response, she hinted that the prospective client would get greater publicity because of her royal status. The debt-ridden firm was eventually shut down.According to Kelly Goldthorpe, a Toronto-based immigration lawyer, if Harry wants to work in Canada, he would need work authorization, and may need to utilize the CETA Free Trade Agreement to get a work permit. Another option is proving that his entry in the Canadian labour market would "have a significant cultural or economic benefit to Canada," Goldthorpe wrote.Assuming Harry could gain such authorization, CBC News contacted three executive recruiting firms to get their opinions on possible employment opportunities.Randy Quarin, senior partner, IQ PARTNERS Inc.Although Harry has limited real or Canadian business experience, Quarin said he has a number of qualities that make him an attractive candidate to employers."He's smart, well-educated, street-smart and he's athletically minded. He's disciplined. He's got military training.  And he also has his own definition of discipline that he's redefining for his present employer [the Crown].""And ... he's compassionate. He works with numerous charities. And he really seems to like and works hard for them."So taking all that into consideration, Quarin suggested Harry, with his military experience — he served two tours in Afghanistan — could become an ambassador for the Canadian Rangers.Harry and his brother Prince William were made honorary members of the 5,000-member unit that's part of the Canadian Armed Forces  Reserves and works in remote regions of Canada.But Harry could also become another ambassador of sorts. While Canadian pop star Drake is known as the Toronto Raptors' global ambassador, Harry could take on a similar role with Canada's national rugby teams, Quarin said. The Duke of Sussex has been involved in the sport as a patron of the U.K.-based Rugby Football League since December 2016, when he succeeded the Queen, who had held the role for 64 years."He could be the brand ambassador," Quarin said. "Don't forget, he used to play rugby in school. He could work on 100 per cent commission because [the rugby association] don't have a lot of money,."Quarin's third suggestion, he said, is a "no-brainer." With all his charitable work, Harry could turn being a spokesman into a full-time gig.Harry is already involved in a number of charitable pursuits, including the Invictus Games Foundation,  an international sporting event for injured or wounded soliders, and  and Sentebale, an African-based foundation to help vulnerable children."The hard one about that is pick the one that is really near and dear to him."Sheila Musgrove, founder, CEO of TAG RecruitmentMusgrove described Harry as a solid communicator, personable and likable, with good people skills that translate into a number of disciplines.She, too, said he could lead any charity in the countryWith his military experience, and his involvement working with injured soldiers, he could play the the same role in Canada, working with the Canadian military, helping veterans.But there are other potential ways he could leverage his military skills, she said. In 2012, Harry qualified as an Apache attack helicopter pilot, graduating as the best co-pilot gunner in his class after 18 months of training. Musgrove said she could see Harry working as an air ambulance pilot.(After his military stint, Harry's brother, William, worked as an air ambulance pilot before focusing full-time on his royal duties.)WATCH: Who will pay for Harry and Meghan's security?"What a great story that would be.You're injured. You fall down and then you get rescued by a prince," Musgrove said.Or, for something a little different, why not train to fly commercial airlines?"If John Travolta can fly for Qantas, the prince can fly me from Calgary to Toronto," Musgrove said.Musgrove also said Harry could get involved in Canadian rugby, leading the Canadian rugby organization to elevate the level of sport in the country.And if Harry and Meghan settle in the West, a perfect gig for him, said Musgrove, would be ski instructor or a lift operator "if he wants to be among the people."Michael French, regional manager, Robert Half Harry's upbringing has groomed him for some sort of leadership role, French said. And his military experience means he comes with a lot of "fantastic skills.""The ability to get things done. Tremendous perseverance. A lot of integrity," French said.He said he could certainly see Harry headlining a global initiative, or landing at several "very small but very deserving organizations.""They may not be big companies, but they may be some not-for-profits that need an elevation. I think he's going to follow his heart," French said. "I think he's going to be really focusing on organizations that are doing great work that are probably underfunded, underserviced that are making a change."But Harry could also hit the speaking circuit, French said."He will be a very hot, in-demand speaker and he's an excellent speaker, he said. "I can see him being very selective of who he speaks for. I can't see him speaking at an Apple or Microsoft event."French said their firm always advises companies to hire "for fit, not for skill," meaning they seek those who possess leadership qualities and can be trained for the missing skills.Companies are full of people who can tick all the task boxes, French said."What they're looking for is someone who can lead them and be the front, I think [Harry's] got a lot of that."

  • Spacewalking astronauts wrap up battery improvements
    News
    The Canadian Press

    Spacewalking astronauts wrap up battery improvements

    CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. — A pair of spacewalking astronauts successfully wrapped up battery improvements outside the International Space Station on Monday, completing a job begun last fall.NASA's Jessica Meir and Christina Koch installed the last new battery in a set of six launched to the orbiting lab in September. They also removed two old batteries in their second spacewalk in under a week to upgrade the station's solar power grid.This marked the women's third spacewalk together. They conducted the world's first all-female spacewalk last October, replacing a failed charging device that bumped the battery replacements into this year.The women had just completed the battery work when Koch inadvertently deployed the hand controller on her emergency jet pack, called a Safer. Meir hurried over to get the controller back in its proper place. Koch called her “my hero.”Mission Control cautioned that, given the current set-up, “we would not count on Christina's Safer" in an emergency. NASA's spacewalking astronauts always wear small Safer jet packs in case they become untethered from the station and float away. It's never been needed.During last Wednesday's spacewalk, Koch's helmet lights and camera came loose. She later found a faulty latch in the helmet assembly and replaced it before floating out Monday.Koch has been aboard the space station for more than 10 months, the longest single spaceflight by a woman. She returns to Earth in just over two weeks.NASA gradually has been replacing the space station's 48 aging, original-style nickel-hydrogen batteries with new and more powerful lithium-ion batteries. Only half as many of the new batteries are needed. So far, 18 new batteries have been installed over the past three years and 36 old ones removed.Another batch of six new batteries will be launched to the orbiting lab this spring to complete the power upgrade. The old batteries, meanwhile, will be discarded in a supply ship.These oversized, boxy batteries keep all the space station's systems running when the outpost is on the night side of Earth, drawing power from the sprawling solar wings. They're not easy to handle: Each is about a yard, or a meter, tall and wide, with a mass of about 400 pounds (180 kilograms.)In all, five spacewalks were needed to complete the battery work this time around. Monitoring the action from inside, NASA astronaut Andrew Morgan congratulated his “astro-sisters” for a mission accomplished.As Monday's seven-hour spacewalk drew to a close, Meir and Koch paid tribute to slain civil rights leader Martin Luther King Jr. on the holiday marking his birth. Koch noted how she and Meir often say how much they owe the pioneering female astronauts who came before them and everyone else working for civil rights and inclusion.“That's why it's so meaningful for us today to be out here, on the day we honour Martin Luther King Jr., who paved the way not only for us, but so many that have a dream,” Koch said.It was their last spacewalk together, at least during this mission.Morgan and Italian astronaut Luca Parmitano will venture outside Saturday to complete repairs to a cosmic ray detector on the space station. The science instrument's cooling system had to be replaced, an intricate job requiring four spacewalks.___The Associated Press Health and Science Department receives support from the Howard Hughes Medical Institute’s Department of Science Education. The AP is solely responsible for all content.Marcia Dunn, The Associated Press

  • Complimenting Others Can Make Us Feel Closer To Each Other
    News
    HuffPost Canada

    Complimenting Others Can Make Us Feel Closer To Each Other

    *Starts doling out compliments left and right*

  • Rejection of claim 'appalling,' says NDP MP
    Canadian Press Videos

    Rejection of claim 'appalling,' says NDP MP

    A woman who alleges she was raped at age 15 while being transported to a residential school has had her settlement claim rejected for a fourth time — a case New Democrat MP Charlie Angus says highlights major gaps in the settlement agreement for survivors. Last week, a B.C. Supreme Court judge ruled the woman’s claim falls outside the scope of the Indian residential schools settlement agreement, because the woman was not yet enrolled at residential school at the time of the alleged sexual assault, and because the accused was not an employee of the school. Angus called the case “appalling,” and called on Crown-Indigenous Relations Minister Carolyn Bennett to intervene.

  • 'No surprises' in coming Ontario budget, Ford tells rural leaders
    News
    The Canadian Press

    'No surprises' in coming Ontario budget, Ford tells rural leaders

    TORONTO — There will be "no surprises" for municipalities in Ontario's spring budget, Premier Doug Ford said Monday, sounding a conciliatory tone following the cuts to services and programs that infuriated local leaders last year.Ford made the comments during a speech at a conference of the Rural Ontario Municipal Association taking place in Toronto two months ahead of the release of his Progressive Conservative government's second spending package."I've told the caucus and our ministers — no surprises," Ford said. "No surprises to municipalities, just lay it on the line. Get their input. 'Cause again, I walked a mile in your shoes. I was a municipal councillor. (There was) nothing I hated more when the province would come up and say, 'Do this, do that.'"During its first year in power, the Tory government slashed public health and child-care funding to municipalities, a move civic leaders said was made without notice or consultation. The backlash forced the government to backtrack on the changes months later.Instead, new cost-sharing arrangements were implemented at much lower levels on Jan. 1, and municipalities were offered transitional funding as they dealt with the changes.On Monday, Ford and his ministers announced $5 million in new funding for economic development partnerships with rural communities, and confirmed a current $500-million municipal partnership fund would remain in place through 2021."We're giving tons of money away, I feel like Santa Claus here," Ford said. "Tons of money. Tons of funds."Finance Minister Rod Phillips said governments learn as they go along and they have heard from municipalities about their need for fiscal certainty."What we learned is that working closely with our partners, and ensuring they understand the direction we're going in ... helps them do a better job," he said. The president of the Association of Municipalities of Ontario said the group has met with the province nearly a dozen times over the past year to give their perspective on policies."We can give that information to the province and hopefully come up with better solutions, better legislation," Jamie McGarvey said.At the conference, NDP Leader Andrea Horwath said the Ford government is failing to fix problems that impact municipalities across Ontario, outlining areas where the province has cut funding, including to public health."This Conservative government is plowing ahead with major cuts to essential programs, and leaving municipalities to pick up the pieces," she said in a statement.This report by The Canadian Press was first published Jan. 20, 2020.Shawn Jeffords, The Canadian Press

  • Ontario elementary teachers kick off week of rotating strikes
    News
    The Canadian Press

    Ontario elementary teachers kick off week of rotating strikes

    TORONTO — Elementary, high school and Catholic teachers in Ontario are engaging in a series of strikes this week, which are shutting down schools after months of increasing tensions and unproductive negotiations with the government.The Elementary Teachers' Federation of Ontario kicked off the week by targeting some of the province's largest school boards — Toronto, York Region and Ottawa-Carleton. The union is planning one-day strikes at other boards throughout the province all week.Teachers carrying signs gathered outside schools in the frigid weather, at times joined by parents and other community members. Other parents dropped children off at day-long "strike camps," set up at art galleries, martial arts clubs, community centres and attractions such as the Toronto Zoo.On Tuesday, the Ontario Secondary School Teachers' Federation is holding a one-day strike at some boards, as is the Ontario English Catholic Teachers' Association. The union representing teachers in the French system has started a work-to-rule campaign.All four major teachers' unions are engaged in job action as they negotiate new collective agreements with the Progressive Conservative government and still seem far apart — an "extremely unusual" situation, one expert said."It's been over 20 years since there was action of this level and this week is exceptional to have rotating strikes every day involving three of the main unions," said Carol Campbell, an associate professor at the University of Toronto's Ontario Institute for Studies in Education.The last time there was this level of labour disruption was under the previous Progressive Conservative government, she said.Campbell doesn't think full strikes are inevitable at this point, but noted the parties are quite far apart and most unions don't have any more bargaining dates scheduled."It's deeply concerning if talks are not happening, because if talks are not happening a deal is not going to be reached and like all relationships people need to keep talking," she said.The unions say that class size increases and the introduction of mandatory e-learning courses in secondary school are among the sticking points — elementary teachers also want guarantees on the future of full-day kindergarten."We know that this is a hardship for parents but it is crystal clear that to date, (Education Minister Stephen) Lecce is only interested in cuts to education," Joy Lachica, president of the Elementary Teachers' of Toronto said in a statement.Lecce insists they're stuck on wages, with the unions asking for increases of around two per cent, and the government offering one per cent. The government passed legislation last year capping salary increases for public sector workers at one per cent for three years, and the teachers' unions are challenging it in court.Lecce repeated his refrain Monday that strikes hurt kids."I think we owe it to the students of this province to not withdraw services from them and to ensure there's a continuum of learning," he said.As the unions ramp up their labour action, the province has sought to strike back.The government announced last week that it would compensate parents affected by the elementary teacher strikes.Under the plan, parents whose kids aren't yet enrolled in school but attend school-based child-care centres affected by the strikes will get the most money — $60 per day — while those with children in grades 1 through 7 will get the least — $25.While parents of secondary school students won't get any funding, those with children with special needs up to age 21 will get $40 per day — the same amount as parents whose kids are in kindergarten.The Ministry of Education has said more than 139,000 parents have signed up for that program, which could cost the government $48 million per day if teachers from all school boards were to strike. That's less than the $60 million per day the government spends in teacher compensation.A petition calling on the government to take the offered "bribe money" and put it back into education has garnered more than 25,000 signatures.This report by The Canadian Press was first published Jan. 20, 2020.Allison Jones, The Canadian Press

  • News
    CBC

    N.W.T. courts' travel policy sets accused up to fail, defence lawyer says

    A prominent Yellowknife defence lawyer is protesting a change in the application of a court travel policy that, he says, is going to leave people who have been released on bail either stuck in jail or homeless on the streets of Yellowknife."It does seem bizarre that you can get released to live on the streets in Yellowknife, but they're not prepared to ship you back to a community that is a safer place for you to be ... and it's - 40 C," said defence lawyer Peter Harte.Harte said, previously, the N.W.T. government would pay the airfare to transport people who have been released on bail to the community they're supposed to be staying in, under their bail conditions. Now, the N.W.T. government — with the courts setting up the travel arrangements — will only pay for airfare to the community where the alleged crime occurred, Harte said.Harte said he became aware of the change last week.For example, Harte said he is representing one man facing charges out of Fort Simpson, N.W.T. The man's bail was agreed to, on the condition he goes to Hay River.But with the way the policy is being applied, the government would only pay for airfare back for Fort Simpson, Harte said, even though it would cost less to fly the man to Hay River.On Friday, after Harte explained the situation his client was in, the warden of the North Slave Correctional Centre agreed to pay the cost of flying the man to Hay River out of the warden's budget.Beaufort Delta man unable to get home In another case currently before the courts, a man from the Beaufort Delta region is facing charges being dealt with in court in Inuvik.The court said he could be released on bail, on the condition that he goes to Yellowknife.However, the accused man cannot afford the airfare — approximately $500 — to return to Inuvik from Yellowknife. The courts have, so far, refused to help him, said Harte.If he does not make it back to Inuvik, he will likely be charged with failing to attend court and breaching his bail condition to attend court as required. He will end up being kept in jail until his case is concluded, according to Harte. It costs approximately $280 per day to house inmates in the N.W.T.Justice Department officials were not immediately available for comment.

  • Public to get more time to file formal complaints against police
    News
    CBC

    Public to get more time to file formal complaints against police

    The province plans to give people in Nova Scotia more time to file an official complaint against police. Right now, someone who wants to file a complaint with the independent Office of the Police Complaints Commisioner has six months to do so. The province plans to extend the time limit to one year.The change would apply to all municipal police forces in Nova Scotia. The time limit on complaints against the RCMP is already one year.The current police complaints process has come under fire in the last year in some high-profile instances, such as Carrie Low, a woman who said Halifax Regional Police failed to properly investigate a rape committed against her.The complaints process was also identified as a concern in the Wortley report, which was released by the Nova Scotia Human Rights Commission last year and examined street checks by police on the black community."I think a year is far more consistent with other policing services across Canada, and a six-month time limit is just ultimately too short," said Emma Halpern, the executive director of the Elizabeth Fry Society of Mainland Nova Scotia. "It doesn't allow people to process what's happened and their concerns and complaints in order to bring it forward. So I think it's definitely a positive all around to see the complaints process amended."However, Halpern said for sexual assault survivors, a one-year time limit on complaints may be too short."Because of the incredible trauma associated with sexual assault, the time at which you might discover that you've had a mishandling of the case or a harm committed by the policing agency, that might happen at a later date once you've had a chance to process the trauma that you've been going through. Really, that shouldn't be limited to a year." Low's complaint against Halifax police was not heard because she filed it outside the six-month time limit. She has launched a court challenge and wants a judge to order the police complaints commissioner to investigate her complaint.The anticipated changes to legislation, however, would not be retroactive and won't help her."I'm certainly delighted to see that there is going to be a change made, however I do feel that there does need to be some alternate changes to that," Low said.One issue is that a person might not discover police have been negligent until much later. Even if they quickly file a complaint, it may still be too long after the negligence actually occurred."For future, people that need to bring complaints against police services, I think it's great, it's a good step in the right direction. But I will be up for a lengthy battle in mine," she said.The province told the Nova Scotia Federation of Municipalities in a letter that the police complaints commissioner will have the ability to extend the timeline beyond one year if there's a good reason to do so, in the public interest.The province hasn't decided exactly what date the change will take effect, but the earliest it could happen is Dec. 19, 2020. Last May, the Halifax board of police commissioners decided to ask the provincial minister of justice to extend the six-month period for complaints to one year, following concerns brought forward in the Wortley report.  The police complaints commissioner, Judith McPhee, also asked for the six months to be extended.'We need to increase the dialogue'Halifax Regional Police Chief Dan Kinsella told reporters at a board of police commissioners meeting Monday that he was not certain how the proposed change would affect the number of complaints and the cost of responding to them. "We will respect any changes that are brought forward," he said. "As far as costing goes, it remains to be seen. Intuitively you would say that there will be an increased cost because there's more of an opportunity for people to bring these matters forward." Kinsella said he thinks it is "exceedingly important" for people to bring their concerns about police forward.  "We need to increase the dialogue, we need to increase community members' opportunities to come forward whenever they want to bring any information in regards to police conduct or activity," he said.  MORE TOP STORIES

  • Moosehead Breweries pledges up to $20K for new Tyne Valley arena
    News
    CBC

    Moosehead Breweries pledges up to $20K for new Tyne Valley arena

    Moosehead Breweries pledged Monday to donate $1 for every case of beer the company sells on P.E.I. for the next month to a fund to rebuild the Tyne Valley arena. The arena burned to the ground in late December, and the fire marshal said it was impossible to determine the fire's cause. "We join the people of Tyne Valley in mourning this heartbreaking loss. The centre was more than a skating rink — it was home to countless community events and provided a real gathering place for people from Tyne Valley and beyond," said Socke MacDonald, territory manager for P.E.I. with Moosehead, in a written release. The company said it hopes the pledge will help kick-start the public donation drive launched by the community to rebuild the rink. Moosehead, based in Saint John, N.B., is the official beer sponsor of Tyne Valley's Oyster Festival and the Rock the Boat Music Festival. A dollar from every case of Moosehead beer, in six-packs or larger, sold at P.E.I. liquor stores from Jan. 20 to Feb. 29 will be donated to the Rally for the Valley campaign, to a maximum of $20,000.Eligible products are Moosehead Lager, Moosehead Light, Moosehead Pale Ale, Moosehead Premium Dry, Moosehead Radler or Alpine."In our own history, Moosehead has experienced devastating fires at our breweries on two occasions," said Moosehead president Andrew Oland in the release. "We understand the impact of these catastrophic events and are proud to lend our support."The Tyne Valley arena is also bidding to become the next Kraft Hockeyville. Last week, organizers with the Sackville Flyers withdrew their bid in an effort to support Tyne Valley — they said Tyne Valley needed it more. That contest comes with the $250,000 prize to be put toward arena upgrades. More P.E.I. news

  • Terra Nova oil platform ordered to stop all work in confined spaces
    News
    CBC

    Terra Nova oil platform ordered to stop all work in confined spaces

    Suncor Energy has been ordered to immediately stop all confined-space work at its Terra Nova oil platform.It's the third restriction issued by the Canada-Newfoundland and Labrador Offshore Petroleum Board related to safety aboard the Terra Nova, about 350 kilometres off the coast of Newfoundland, in just over a month.The provincial oil and gas regulatory board has also ordered that all confined-space work policies and procedures be reviewed by Suncor and updated for compliance with regulatory requirements.The measures are to ensure worker safety, said a release from the C-NLOPB.On Dec. 19, Suncor was told to stop production due to defective redundant fire-water pumps on the Terra Nova.Less than two weeks later, on Dec. 29, a worker aboard the Terra Nova fell from a ladder inside a tank while conducting gas testing aboard the Terra Nova. The employee was flown to hospital after suffering what the board called sustained "non-life-threatening injuries."As Suncor submitted its review of the incident, the C-NLOPB ordered the company to implement a fall protection system for all ladders above six metres.The board's most recent order, issued Saturday, comes following the completion of its own review of the incident, and the C-NLOPB has started an inquiry. All issued orders will remain in effect until its completion. At that time, the C-NLOPB will also determine if additional enforcement action is warranted."Our investigation into the incident is ongoing. Once the investigation is complete, learnings will be evaluated and appropriate actions will be implemented. Our first priority is always the safety of our team and we're committed to taking necessary actions to keep them safe," a Suncor spokesperson said in an email to CBC on Monday evening."We are taking this action from the C-NLOPB seriously and assessing our procedures for confined space entry in accordance with the order received."Read more from CBC Newfoundland and Labrador

  • News
    CBC

    Kingston firefighters call off 'dog' rescue

    Firefighters in Kingston, Ont., responding to a call about a stranded dog Monday called off the rescue when they realized they were dealing with a different kind of canine altogether.In a statement, the Kingston Department of Fire & Rescue said it received a call at 10:18 a.m. from a concerned resident who thought they had spotted a domestic dog on the ice of the Great Cataraqui River, north of the LaSalle Causeway and just east of the city's downtown.The "dog" later turned out to be a wild coyote and the rescue was called off."Respecting the health and safety of our first responders, a rescue was not attempted," the fire department said in a statement.The department said it's in the process of contacting the Ministry of Natural Resources to follow up on the situation.Fire officials used the incident to remind people to stay off the ice, and to keep their pets off, too. If you see an animal in peril, call in the professionals instead of attempting a rescue yourself.

  • Canadian woman spends savings helping animals injured in bushfires
    News
    Yahoo News Canada

    Canadian woman spends savings helping animals injured in bushfires

    A Canadian university graduate has used most of her savings to travel to Australia to donate $1200 worth of medical supplies for injured wildlife.

  • News
    CBC

    Teen almost freezes to death in Miramichi snow bank

    Miramichi Police say a teen almost froze to death on Friday after laying exposed in the snow with the temperature at -22 C.An officer was dispatched Friday morning, said a statement from the force, after a report of what appeared to be clothing spotted in the snow in a residential driveway."The responding officer saw footprints and then waded through knee-high snow," said the police.The officer found a 16-year-old girl who was almost totally covered by snow."She was not wearing a coat or shoes and was almost non responsive," said police."Her hands were purple and her clothing was frozen."The girl was rushed to the hospital where she was treated for an extreme case of hypothermia.Police said officers made a follow-up visit and were told the teen is expected to make a full recovery.There is no word on the address where she was found, why the girl was in the snow or how long she had been there.

  • News
    CBC

    Switch glitch, jammed doors and smoke: A weekend to forget for Ottawa's LRT

    Ottawa's Confederation Line experienced several serious problems during the biggest snowfall of the season this weekend, from tripped switches to jammed doors to smoke filling the tunnel.The most significant delay for riders occurred around 6:30 p.m. Saturday — only a few hours after the snow began falling — when track switches were "disturbed" at the eastern end of the Confederation Line, triggering replacement bus service for two hours.OC Transpo tweeted about the delay at the time, and on Sunday morning emailed CBC News a statement explaining that "snow interfered with the normal operation of a switch at Blair station."The email, attributed to transit operations director Troy Charter, explained safety sensors that are supposed to detect whether people are on the tracks were being activated by snow, and could cause trains to come to a sudden halt. To get around this problem, train operators were instructed to move slowly, which would have contributed to the delays for customers.A persistent problemAnother switch issue caused the Confederation Line to shut down on Sunday evening, again between Hurdman and Blair. This time, according to OC Transpo's Twitter feed, replacement bus service lasted 40 minutes.Switch problems are among the four main issues that have been plaguing the LRT system, along with jamming doors and two separate computer problems.City officials have known about the potential problem posed by snow on the switches for some time.Fibreglass switch covers installed by Rideau Transit Group (RTG) to prevent snow buildup have actually caused some recent delays, and have since been removed along the line. The city has urged RTG to post extra staff on the ground this winter, especially at those switches.According to Charter, the maintenance arm of RTG "did have staff at various points," but that the oversight didn't appear to be enough to prevent the switch issues.Door, smoke issue not reportedThere were other issues on the Confederation Line this weekend that were not made public, CBC has learned.On Sunday morning, a train was disabled at Tunney's Pasture station, shutting down service for a while. Around midday, the doors on a train at Hurdman station failed to open, and customers were unable to board or exit the train. It's unclear how long this problem lasted.Far more concerning was the presence of smoke on the line. According to social media, smoke filled part of tunnel shortly after 10 a.m. on Sunday. An internal incident report shown to CBC indicated the smoke and a burning smell were caused by a "wheel flat" — a wheel that has ceased turning and is grinding against the track.Charter confirmed reports of the smoke to CBC, and said the issue is being investigated.According to a CBC source, another train was removed from Blair station Monday morning after reports of a burning smell and "train slippage."OC Transpo said in a statement on Monday afternoon that the Confederation Line is down to 10 trains from "the required 13" because of a series of mechanical issues, including the problems with air compressors and wheel issues.As well, the train that pulled down 80 metres of electric cable last Thursday is being inspected to try to figure out the cause of the alarming incident.

  • Environment minister calls Maritime Iron's emissions projections 'concerning'
    News
    CBC

    Environment minister calls Maritime Iron's emissions projections 'concerning'

    The company pitching an iron processing facility in northern New Brunswick acknowledges in a major regulatory filing that carbon dioxide emissions will increase in the province if the plant goes ahead.Maritime Iron's 490-page registration for a provincial environmental impact assessment, posted online Monday, shows a potential increase of more than two million tonnes of greenhouse gas emissions over current levels."It is a little bit concerning that our emissions will rise when we're trying to be on the other side of that and reduce our emissions here in New Brunswick," said Environment Minister Jeff Carr.He said he would have to balance the potential economic boost in the Chaleur region with the likelihood the plant would cause the province to miss its emissions-reduction targets. The EIA document says by linking the iron plant to NB Power's Belledune generating station, which would burn gas byproduct from the iron plant and reduce its coal consumption, the two facilities would emit a combined 4.9 million tons of greenhouse gases.That's almost double the 2.6 million tons that Belledune now emits alone, and more than the Irving Oil refinery, currently the province's largest emitter.But the document avoids that comparison. Instead, it says the 4.9 million tons of emissions would be less than the 6.5 million total if the Maritime Iron and Belledune plants operated separately. 'There's some pretty fancy math'However that scenario ignores the potential shutdown of Belledune in 2030, when NB Power must phase out coal-fired electricity generation."There's some pretty fancy math … which is, 'based in a perfect world, if we were in charge of writing all the regulations, this might be okay,'" said Lois Corbett of the Conservation Council of New Brunswick."But that's not exactly the situation that the climate faces right now. What this project will do is push New Brunswick greenhouse gas pollution way over its current cap."The province's climate plan includes a target of getting emission to within 30 per cent below 2005 levels by 2030. The province is very close to that target now. "I'd like to keep it that way," Carr said, conceding any major increase in emissions from a new industrial plant would put the goal in jeopardy.The Maritime Iron proposal was registered in the wake of 420 jobs being lost with the shutdown of the Glencore lead smelter in Belledune.If the project goes ahead, the company says it will create 1,300 direct jobs during construction and 200 permanent jobs during the plant's operations.In its EIA document, Maritime Iron says by supplying the Belledune plant with a gas byproduct as a fuel source, it can help NB Power cut coal consumption there by more than 50 per cent.That would mean Belledune "can continue beyond 2029" because reduced coal use will bring it in line with federal regulations, it says.Equivalency agreement neededBut Carr said that would require what's called an equivalency agreement, in which Ottawa would agree to exempt the plant from the national coal-phaseout deadline in return for equal emissions reductions elsewhere in New Brunswick. "I don't think anyone who wants to build a billion-and-a-half-dollar facility should assume that there's going to be an equivalence agreement and there won't be a huge price on carbon by the time this project comes to fruition, "Corbett said."They are writing a project proposal as if there were an agreement in place and that's not their decision. That's the federal government's decision." The $1.5 billion iron plant would also be subject to the federal carbon price on large industries, unless Ottawa accepts a proposal from New Brunswick's Progressive Conservative government for an alternative pricing system.NB Power CEO Gaetan Thomas said recently that the utility is working on an equivalency agreement. If Belledune closed, Maritime Iron's emissions impact alone would be 3.8 million tonnes, still a net increase to the provincial total compared to today. But it's not clear whether the company's business model is viable if it can't link to the NB Power plant and sell its gas byproduct to the utility. Company urges project be seen in global contextIn the EIA document, a legally required step to win provincial approval, Maritime Iron downplays its potential emissions of greenhouse gases in New Brunswick by urging officials to zoom out to a global perspective.Maritime Iron says its project should be considered "within a global, national, and provincial context" that allows it to argue it's climate-friendly.That includes an argument that its Finex technology, a new way of processing iron ore into pig iron, would reduce global emissions by 40 per cent — a figure irrelevant to New Brunswick's emissions target. Maritime Iron also argues that by shipping Canadian pig iron to markets now using older processing technology, the company "will be helping the world transition away from jurisdictions that use more energy intensive traditional technologies and that have higher GHG emitting electrical grids." It says Canadian iron ore from Quebec is now shipped 28,000 kilometres to China and Korea for processing. The shipping distance to Belledune would be only 425 kilometres, reducing emissions from freighters.At the same time, processed pig iron now shipped to a distribution hub in New Orleans travels 12,000 kilometres from Russia, whereas the trip from Belledune would be 4,500 kilometres.But Canada, and New Brunswick, can't earn any credit for those reductions from shipping emissions because there is no global agreement in place on how to measure and exchange such reductions. "We don't get a credit for that on the global scale," Carr said.International negotiators tried and failed to reach such a deal in the latest round of global climate negotiations in Madrid in November. Carr said a technical committee will begin assessing the proposal. He said it's "anybody's guess" how long the process will take.

  • News
    CBC

    Alberta post-secondary funding will be tied to performance

    The Alberta government announced Monday that it intends to tie post-secondary funding to performance measures. Advanced Education Minister Demetrios Nicolaides said each institution in the province will be consulted on the measures and will be able to establish their own priorities, alongside some system-wide targets. The top priority for the University of Calgary, for example, would likely be different from the top priority for the Alberta University of the Arts. That said, the government does have some ideas. "There are, indeed, several indicators that government would like to see, which include graduation and completion rates, graduate employment, experiential learning, enrolment both domestic and international, commercialization of [intellectual property], research capacity, quality of teaching and student experience and student satisfaction," said Nicolaides. April 1 deadlineOnce the metrics are established, the government will tie Campus Alberta Grants — approximately 40 per cent of funding — to those metrics, starting April 1. If, for example, a university meets only 90 per cent of its targets, it will receive only 90 per cent of its provincial funding. Those funding agreements will be in place for three-year intervals rather than annual renewals. "Changing course every year does not allow our institutions the flexibility and freedom that they need to improve and reach their targets," said Nicolaides.The government will implement the new policy in stages, with 15 per cent of funding tied to the measures starting in April, and ramping up to the full 40 per cent by 2022-2023.'Unintended consequences'Sadiya Nazir, chair of Council of Alberta University Students, which represents students at Alberta's universities, said it's cautiously optimistic about the move but that more information is needed. "Our concerns are that any metrics that are in place, we don't want them to negatively impact students at the end of the day," she said. "And so our hope is that any metrics that are implemented in this model have data that is sound and will not lead to any unintended consequences."Her organization's main concern is around transparency and ensuring the public has access to information on why the metrics were chosen and how they might impact students.Garrett Koehler, with the Alberta Students' Executive Council, which represents students at Alberta's colleges, said his organization is excited about the changes. "I think it's going to force institutions and admin to really start thinking a little bit more closely on what they're spending their money on, what strategic directions are gonna be going towards, which ultimately save students, institutions and taxpayers money," he said. Bad dataNot everyone, however, is sold on the new measures. The Alberta Graduate Provincial Advocacy Council said that while funding transparency should be applauded, it shouldn't come at the cost of adequate funding. "We need safeguards to ensure an institution doesn't get caught in a downward spiral. If a university isn't able to reach its performance targets, its funding shouldn't be immediately cut," said the organization's chair, Marcela Lopes. Peter Schryvers is the author of a new book called Bad Data: Why We Measure the Wrong Things and Often Miss the Metrics That Matter. It looks at how decisions are made based on faulty criteria, including decisions in post-secondaries. "One of the things, actually two of the things that [the UCP] are proposing to evaluate schools on are the income of their graduates later in the future and then also graduation rates," he said. "So with graduation rates, one way it skews organizations is that one of the easiest ways to actually increase graduation rates is to make it easier to graduate."He also points to jobs that are important in society but which make less money, such as social work and nursing. "So what will happen is that post-secondary institutions will start to look at ways to manage those admissions," said Schryvers. One thing Alberta did better than other jurisdictions, he said, is allowing each institution to tailor its own metrics. "Having broad brush strokes is never a good idea," he said. "However, you also have a situation when people can choose their own metrics, they're going to choose ones that they're really good at, and they're going to downplay ones that they're bad at."Schryvers said that beyond relying on bad data to make decisions, there's also value in that which cannot be quantified. "You have to be careful not to only care about the things that you measure, but also care about the things that you just can't count," he said. Opposition responseThe opposition NDP said the moves will force post-secondaries to track additional metrics. "The UCP's record when it comes to Advanced Education is tuition hikes, the elimination of education and tuition tax credits, increasing the interest on student loans, and cutting grants for universities and colleges, all to pay for this government's $4.7-billion, no-jobs corporate handout," said MLA Sarah Hoffman in a news release."Rather than trying to distract from his failures on this file and binding our institutions and students with greater amounts of red tape, Minister Nicolaides should be focusing on undoing the devastating cuts they've already imposed."

  • Tesla rebuffs U.S. safety recall petition, says no unintended acceleration in vehicles
    News
    Reuters

    Tesla rebuffs U.S. safety recall petition, says no unintended acceleration in vehicles

    The petition urged the agency to recall all Tesla vehicles, the Model S, Model X and Model 3, produced beginning in 2013. It cited media reports of crashes attributed to unintended acceleration and complaints filed with NHTSA.

  • A growing job market but more part time work: A picture of employment in Toronto
    News
    CBC

    A growing job market but more part time work: A picture of employment in Toronto

    The city just released the results of its employment survey for 2019, which gives a snapshot of Toronto's job market.On the whole, jobs are up. The survey counted just over 1.5 million jobs in the region, which is an increase of 3.1 per cent from 2018. That's a number that exceeds the city's five-year average employment growth rate of 2.5 per cent, as well as Toronto's 10-year average rate of two per cent.But it's important to note what kinds of jobs are seeing the most gains. Full-time employment (which amounts to 75.1 per cent of that total) grew more slowly than the city average, rising 2.8 per cent from 2018.Part time employment (which amounts 24.9 per cent of the total) rose by four per cent compared to last year."The 2018-2019 trend reflects a long term increase in the share of part-time employment in the city," the city said in its report.And though the number of jobs are rising, not every sector is seeing the same boost. After seeing growth for the last two years, employment in the manufacturing and warehousing sector declined by 920 jobs in 2019, which represents a 0.7 per cent drop.The city noted closures like the Campbell's Soup factory in Etobicoke, which previously contributed 500 manufacturing jobs, as part of the reason for that change.While manufacturing took a hit, it was at least somewhat offset by gains in warehousing, which grew by 7.1 per cent in the last year.The city found that is contributing to a demand for industrial space, which is being driven by both e-commerce and food warehousing and distribution, as evidenced by the recent expansion or planned construction of distribution centres for Amazon and Canada Post in Scarborough, and Purolator and Metro in Etobicoke.Office work continues to be the city's largest employment driver with 753,420 jobs, making up 48.0 per cent of the city's total.There were 23,470 office jobs added last year, which is half of all new jobs, and a jump of 3.2 per cent from 2018.There was also growth in the public universities and colleges sector, which added almost 7,800 jobs. The city says almost half of that increase was due to a return to full staffing numbers of teaching assistants at York University after the 2018 strike.The rest of the growth in that sector came from expansion and increases in enrollment at a range of institutions, which the city says reflects a Canada-wide trend toward higher enrollment over the last decade.

  • 'África's richest woman' out of Davos well before report
    News
    The Canadian Press

    'África's richest woman' out of Davos well before report

    DAVOS, Switzerland — The rapidly changing circumstances for Isabel dos Santos, widely known as “Africa's richest woman,” is evident by her absence at the the World Economic Forum in Switzerland.Instead of hobnobbing with world leaders in Davos, she is confronted with calls for her to be investigated for criminal corruption and is hotly defending herself on Twitter.Forum organizers said the participation of dos Santos, daughter of longtime Angolan strongman Jose Eduardo dos Santos, at the forum's annual gathering in Davos was cancelled this month, well before an investigation alleged that she bilked her country of more than $1 billion through unscrupulous dealings. Forum spokesman Max Hall refused to specify whether the forum or dos Santos cancelled her participation.However, the forum says it's maintaining its ties to one of the companies controlled by dos Santos.The forum said dos Santos's company, Unitel, “remains a partner.” Such partner companies can pay tens of thousands of dollars for the privilege of associating with the forum, which this week is hosting U.S. President Donald Trump and some 3,000 leaders of business, politics and civil society.The controversy surrounding dos Santos increased this week when the International Consortium of Investigative Journalists and 36 media partners accused her of “two decades of unscrupulous deals.”Dos Santos, her husband and their intermediaries put together a web of more than 400 companies in 41 countries that over the past decade were awarded consulting jobs, loans, public works contracts and licenses worth billions of dollars from the Angolan government, the investigation charged on Sunday.The allegations were based on more than 715,000 confidential financial and business records provided by the Platform to Protect Whistleblowers in Africa, an advocacy group based in Paris, as well as hundreds of interviews. The cache of documents is known as Luanda Leaks, named for Angola's capital, Luanda.Dos Santos took to Twitter to dismiss the investigation as lies.“The ICIJ report is based on many fake documents and false information, it is a co-ordinated political attack in co-ordination with the “Angolan Government”. 715 thousand documents read? Who believes that?icij lies”Last December, a Luanda court froze dos Santos's major assets, which include banks and a telecom company. The government says it is trying to recover $1.1 billion it says the country is owed by dos Santos, her husband and a close associate of the couple.Angola anti-corruption activist Rafael Marques urged Angolan and Portuguese authorities to investigate dos Santos for crimes.“Isabel dos Santos and her facilitators have to be investigated,” said Marques to the Portuguese New Agency, Lusa. "“We are talking about money laundering schemes that have harmed Angola and the Angolans and should be seriously investigated.”One of the firms that worked with companies controlled by dos Santos was accounting firm PwC. Its CEO, Bob Moritz, told The Associated Press in Davos that it is conducting an investigation and has “ceased doing work for her and the organizations around her.”“I'm personally tremendously disappointed in terms of the association we had, and the fact that we didn't get out of that relationship earlier," he said. "But I'm thankful that we're getting out of it now.”He declined to elaborate. PwC had longtime business dealings with dos Santos.Jose Eduardo dos Santos ruled the oil- and diamond-rich nation for 38 years until 2017. Human rights groups have long accused the former president of stealing vast amounts of state money during his rule. Despite the country's wealth, poverty is widespread among Angola's 30 million people and its standards of health and education are abysmally low, according to U.N. surveys.Isabel dos Santos said that she has amassed her fortune, estimated by Forbes Magazine at $2.2 billion, through hard work. She has said on Twitter that she will use all possible legal means to fight the legal actions against her and her companies.In London, Angola's Minister of Economic and Social Development, Manuel Nunes Júnior, said Monday that no one is above the law.Junior spoke in London while attending the first UK-Africa Investment Summit, opened by Prime Minister Boris Johnson and attended by Prince Harry."We need to have a true rule of law in Angola. We believe that the rule of law is the essential element for the confidence of agents in the society in which we operate," he said, according to Lusa.In response to questions from journalists the Angolan minister said that “no one can be above the law, the law must be the same for everyone."___This story was corrected to show that Prince Harry attended the opening of the investor's summit in London. Prince William hosted a reception for the summit.Jamey Keaten, The Associated Press

  • What Canadians should know about the mysterious emerging virus in China
    News
    Yahoo News Canada

    What Canadians should know about the mysterious emerging virus in China

    A mysterious virus is emerging in China, with 200 cases already confirmed and nearly 2,000 more anticipated. Here's what you need to know about this new virus.

  • Canadian Forces dispatches members to help provide assistance to Newfoundland residents under snow
    Global News

    Canadian Forces dispatches members to help provide assistance to Newfoundland residents under snow

    Canadian Armed Forces members were dispatched to various parts of St. John's, Newfoundland on Monday to assist in digging residents out from the snow that fell Friday during a major storm.

  • News
    CBC

    Car fire started in engine compartment, Charlottetown fire inspector says

    A car that caught fire on the Charlottetown bypass between Brackley Point Road and St. Peters Road on Sunday afternoon has been deemed a total loss.Charlottetown firefighters responded to the call at about 4:30 p.m.No one was injured."The fire was contained to the engine compartment, where the area of origin was," said Charlottetown Fire Inspector Winston Bryan.The car was occupied by four men in their 20s who were headed toward the West Royalty area.Front end on fire"The fire was extinguished by firefighters quite quickly," Bryan said.He said the car had been stuck in a nearby driveway just prior to the fire. The men were pulled over by a passerby who noticed their car was on fire underneath its front end. Bryan said with the plastic materials used to make cars now, they can "ignite quite easily." More car fires in winterHe said visibility on the bypass became poor as a result of smoke. Firefighters were forced to detour traffic for about 30 minutes while the fire was put out and the smoke cleared.He noted the fire department tends to respond to more engine fires in winter. "They were stuck and revving the car and moving it back and forth trying to get it out. [It] heats up the motor, heats up the transmission and the belts then the engine compartment, if not serviced over a period of time, it could cause ignition within the engine compartment."Bryan asks that Islanders take the extra time to shovel their driveways and service their vehicles regularly to avoid similar incidents.More P.E.I. news

  • Waskimo Festival cancelled this year due to damage to bird habitat
    News
    CBC

    Waskimo Festival cancelled this year due to damage to bird habitat

    The popular Waskimo Winter Festival which held its last three events on Wascana Lake in Regina will not take place in 2020 due to shore line degradation.The festival had been held on the ice near the Conexus Arts Centre — an area the Saskatchewan government said is near a federally designated migratory bird sanctuary. "Shoreline degradation caused by the ice surface location directly impacted nesting habitat, food and protection for waterfowl," said Jonathan Tremblay, director of communications for the Ministry of Government Relations, in an emailed statement. "For Waskimo to continue using the ice surface in the Wascana marsh area, they would be required to apply for permits under the Aquatic Habitat Protection Program and the Migratory Bird Convention Act, both of which outline concerns with alterations to habitat."Tremblay said the Provincial Capital Commission also offered help in the form of an on-land ice surface on the west side of Broad Street at no cost, plus $5,000 for facility rental costs."We are sad to see the event cancelled by the organizers, but we certainly look forward to working with them on an environmentally sustainable solution in future years," Tremblay's email said.It was decided that the festival would be cancelled after the Waskimo board met with the government multiple times about the shore line concerns, said Jeremy Parnes, chair of the Waskimo Winter Festival committee."This is just the reality of having that many people on the ice at that time," Parnes said. "We are truly saddened that we are not able to do it this year."Parnes said without the ice, there wouldn't be events like the skating competition and outhouse races, which would make the event a shadow of itself, so it was cancelled.It's unclear if the festival can be moved or held in another area, Parnes said, but added the board is considering the options available."We're a passionate group. We don't give up easy and we don't take no for an answer," Parnes said. "So that bodes really well for our positive possibilities in 2021."Waskimo Winter Festival was scheduled for Family Day on Feb. 17.

  • News
    CBC

    5,000 volunteers needed for 2023 Canada Winter Games on P.E.I.

    The co-chair of the 2023 Canada Winter Games says about 5,000 volunteers will be needed to pull off the Island-wide celebration of sport.Wayne Carew, co-chair of the Games, recently announced the board of directors and will, within the next few weeks, announce the board of management — the nine senior leadership volunteers from across the province who will work to bring cultural events and the 24 sport competitions to life."It's like holding 24 national competitions under one roof," said Carew, who is working with co-chair Brian McFeely.Those nine leadership volunteers will recruit their own teams for a total of about 200 pre-Games volunteers. Then roughly 5,000 people will be needed for the $54-million Games slated for February and March three years from now. That's about one volunteer for every 31 Islanders, but Carew feels it's of no concern. "That's the least I have to worry about," he said brightly.The search for those volunteers comes later. More immediate concerns include selecting all the locations for sporting and cultural events, as well as making weather-related contingency plans. "We'll need lots of chips, of course, but we'll need to make provisions as to how we will do those events that are getting cancelled, so that everyone will have completed the Games before they go home," he said.$110M economic impactCarew said the entire Island will be involved one way or the other from tip to tip."Our mandate from the province … was that the Games be Island-wide and that's what we are endeavouring to do."He said the economic impact of the Games is predicted to be about $110 million and noted that it will serve as a kickoff to celebrations for the 150th anniversary of P.E.I. joining Confederation."It's a great way to fill up every hotel room on Prince Edward Island for three weeks," he said. "It will be a good economic impact as well as an awful lot of fun."More P.E.I news

  • Tecumseh concrete manufacturer fined $175k after 2018 worker death
    News
    CBC

    Tecumseh concrete manufacturer fined $175k after 2018 worker death

    A Tecumseh company has been fined $175,000 after the 2018 death of an employee and the critical injury of another.Prestressed Systems Inc. (PSI) pleaded guilty on Monday to failing to provide proper protections for Michael Cobb, an employee who died in an April 12, 2018 incident at the Tecumseh concrete manufacturer, after an equipment failure. Randal Sullivan, another employee, was critically injured in the same incident.  Patrick Ducharme, a Windsor-based criminal defense lawyer who represented PSI in court, said the company from the very beginning "was desirous of resolving the matter [and] they would be prepared to enter a guilty plea that would admit responsibility.""No matter what fails mechanically, it's their job to make sure that all the equipment is safe at all times," he said. Ducharme said the manufacturer of the equipment owned by PSI that failed was called in during the aftermath of the incident. "They examined the machinery and they felt that it should have been operating properly, but it failed obviously," said Ducharme. "It failed because there's particular guide wires that are supposed to keep these heavily pressured items in place and it failed."PSI won't be required to pay the fine for 12 months. According to Ducharme, the company specifically asked for special permission "because they had a number of jobs that were out at the time and there was going to be some time before it would be paid for the completion of those jobs.""They asked for the unusual request that the fine not be paid for 12 months, and the Crown agreed to that," he said. The fine will be paid to the Ontario Ministry of Labour.Crown attorney Steven Succi explained that PSI's lawyers said their client accepted responsibility and has also undertaken steps to ensure a similar event doesn't occur in the future. In this case, I believe they've decommissioned the equipment that was used and they've introduced new training standards and reinforced processes to ensure that the tasks they perform at their workplace, which involve the stressing and de-stressing of large concrete structures, don't generate hazards for their workers," Succi said. According to Succi, the penalty imposed on PSI is intended as a deterrent to prevent both PSI and other companies from "repeating this type of offence."He added that the penalty imposed on PSI is not meant to compensate for the loss of Cobb's life. The Cobb family declined to comment after the hearing.