'I dropped my son on his head....': Star opens up about 'traumatic' accident

Jenny Mollen and Jason Biggs. Image via Getty Images.

Jenny Mollen’s is opening up about a traumatic accident that caused her five-year-old son, Sid, to fracture his skull.

In a new Instagram post, the actress and writer reveals her eldest son, whom she shares with husband Jason Biggs, was taken to hospital after she accidentally dropped him on his head.

“On Saturday evening, I dropped my son on his head causing him to fracture his skull and landing him in the ICU,” Mollen wrote. “I am forever grateful to Lennox Hill Downtown and New York-Presbyterian Hospital for their immediate response and aid.”

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The mother-of-two, who does not share photos of her children on social media to protect their privacy, is understandably shaken by the incident.

“It has been a traumatic week but Sid is home now and taking things slowly and recovering nicely,” she said. “He is also eating a lot of chocolate dipped ice cream cones and plans to try cherry dipped soon.”

Head injuries are one of the most common causes of pediatric deaths and disabilities. In the United States, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reports that traumatic brain injuries in particular, send nearly half-a-million children to hospital each year.

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Skull fractures occur when there is a break in the skull bone. Although they may not result in an external wound, it’s important that skull fractures be treated immediately.

Image via Getty Images.

Symptoms of skull fractures include headache where impact occurred, bump or bruising at impact point, bruising behind the ears or under the eyes, bleeding from a would, clear fluid leaking from the nose or ears, drowsiness, confusion, slurred speech and impaired vision.

In some cases, the child who sustained injury may convulse, have difficulty breathing, begin vomiting or become unconscious.

The risk of brain damage or injury depends on the location and severity of the fracture. According to a 2014 study, a majority of pediatric skull fractures can be managed and treated without surgery.

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The “Live Fast Die Hot” author went on to thank hospital staff and her husband for their support, before sharing a message to other parents who may be wrestling with the guilt of causing an unintentional injury to their child.

“My heart goes out to all parents who have or will ever find themselves in this kind of position,” she said. “You are not alone…”

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