Jesse Plemons explains how Kirsten Dunst snuck into 'Black Mirror' episode

Kevin Polowy
Senior Correspondent, Yahoo Entertainment

Somewhat lost in all the hoopla (and anti-hoopla) over “USS Callister” (aka “The Star Trek Episode”), the Season 4 premiere of Netflix’s techno-thriller hit Black Mirror, were a couple of sly celebrity cameos. And both had connections to episode star Jesse Plemons, who headlined with dual roles of awkward video-game programmer Daly and swaggy Captain Kirk-esque ship commander.

There was the voice of Aaron Paul, Plemons’s Breaking Bad costar, who chimed in as an obsessive gamer. And there was a blink-and-miss appearance by Kirsten Dunst, Plemons’s Fargo co-star, fiancée, and future baby mama, who quickly passes by in the background during a scene at the Callister offices.

In a Facebook Live interview with Yahoo Entertainment promoting his new movie, Game Night, Plemons explained how Dunst ended up as an extra (watch above).

“I almost don’t want to say anything because there are so many theories about it, which are really fun,” he said. (For a sampling of theories, like one about Dunst’s character actually being the human form of a monster we see earlier in the episode, look no further than Reddit.)

“But she was visiting, and she decided to sneak in, pretty much.”

And Plemons, who clarified that the episode’s director, Toby Haynes, approved the sneak-on, thinks Dunst stole the moment. “It was a very intense walk. It’s a split second, but there’s something going on there.”

Game Night opens Feb. 23.

Watch Plemons reflect on Landry’s controversial murder plot in Friday Night Lights:

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