Kansas City, Kansas got a new pothole patching machine. What should the city name it?

·2 min read

Kansas City, Kansas, roads may soon be smoother and safer thanks to a new piece of equipment acquired by the city’s Public Works department.

The United Government of Kansas City, Kansas and Wyandotte County unveiled its new spray pothole patcher on Wednesday. This versatile machine fills potholes and repairs road damage quickly using the power of compressed air. Here’s what to know about this new road repair asset, and how you can help pick its name.

What is a ‘spray pothole patcher’?

A spray pothole patcher is like a Swiss Army knife of road repair: It combines multiple useful tools into one machine. These devices use the power of compressed air to do everything from clearing debris to installing signposts to filling potholes and road cracks.

Spray patchers are sold both as trailers and as truck-mounted devices. Kansas City, Kansas recently acquired a truck style patcher, which the city says can fill up to 200 potholes per day. The patcher only requires one person to operate.

After blasting out all debris from a potehole with highly compressed air, this spray pothole patching vehicle, now being used by the Kansas City, Kansas Public Works Department, sprays a hot asphalt mix into the hole and then covers it with crushed rock. The work is completed by one person, who operates the machine from the vehicle’s cab. In some cases, the new vehicle can patch potholes in as little as two minutes. KCK Public Works is having a contest to name the newfangled machine. To vote, visit wycokck.org/NameThePatcher or dial 3-1-1. Voting will close on July 1.
After blasting out all debris from a potehole with highly compressed air, this spray pothole patching vehicle, now being used by the Kansas City, Kansas Public Works Department, sprays a hot asphalt mix into the hole and then covers it with crushed rock. The work is completed by one person, who operates the machine from the vehicle’s cab. In some cases, the new vehicle can patch potholes in as little as two minutes. KCK Public Works is having a contest to name the newfangled machine. To vote, visit wycokck.org/NameThePatcher or dial 3-1-1. Voting will close on July 1.

How long do these pothole repairs last?

Schwarze Industries, which makes road repair equipment including spray patchers, estimates that repairs made by these machines last between four and seven years. They are resistant to the freeze and thaw cycles of winter and can be driven on by traffic immediately after being completed.

What is the patching vehicle’s name?

Great question. The city is conducting a poll to decide on one of four fun names for the new vehicle. Here are the options:

  • Smooth Operator

  • Patchy

  • Super Patch

  • WyCo Wonder

“To welcome the arrival of this new pothole patcher, we thought the name ‘Spray Pothole Patcher’ was a bit boring. So we want the community to vote on what we should name it,” said Dave Reno, a spokesperson for the city of Kansas City, Kansas’ Public Works department. Vote on your favorite name here. Voting closes on July 1 at 5 p.m.

After blasting out all debris from a pothole with highly compressed air, this spray pothole patching vehicle, now being used by the Kansas City, Kansas Public Works Department, sprays a hot asphalt mix into the hole and then covers it with crushed rock. The work is completed by one person, who operates the machine from the vehicle’s cab. In some cases, the new vehicle can patch potholes in as little as two minutes. KCK Public Works is having a contest to name the newfangled machine. To vote, visit wycokck.org/NameThePatcher or dial 3-1-1. Voting will close on July 1.
After blasting out all debris from a pothole with highly compressed air, this spray pothole patching vehicle, now being used by the Kansas City, Kansas Public Works Department, sprays a hot asphalt mix into the hole and then covers it with crushed rock. The work is completed by one person, who operates the machine from the vehicle’s cab. In some cases, the new vehicle can patch potholes in as little as two minutes. KCK Public Works is having a contest to name the newfangled machine. To vote, visit wycokck.org/NameThePatcher or dial 3-1-1. Voting will close on July 1.

Does Kansas City, Missouri have one of these machines, too?

According to Reno, the new patcher is currently the only one in the metro. While Kansas City has taken significant steps in recent years to improve its road conditions, some residents are still unsatisfied with the potholes and other damage on their local roads.

Last month, the city approved nearly $40 million in street resurfacing contracts. Here are some tips for getting the city to take action on a pothole in your area.

Do you have more questions about road maintenance in the Kansas City area? Ask the Service Journalism team at kcq@kcstar.com.

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