This KC community pool closed after turning bright green. Here’s why & when it’ll reopen

While the fountains were running and the slide towered temptingly on a 90-degree day, no one could swim in the Mary Williams-Neal Community Center Pool on Tuesday.

That’s because the pool water was the same color as the frog-shaped kiddie slide: green.

The swimming pool, located at the intersection of Emanuel Cleaver II Boulevard and Cleveland Avenue, was closed. The facility, formerly known as the Brush Creek Community Center, is run by Kansas City Parks and Recreation.

The water at the Mary Williams-Neal Community Center pool turned green. A Kansas City Parks and Recreation representative said damage to the pool’s pump and motor caused the color change. June 25, 2024.
The water at the Mary Williams-Neal Community Center pool turned green. A Kansas City Parks and Recreation representative said damage to the pool’s pump and motor caused the color change. June 25, 2024.

Two workers were vacuuming the pool at 11 a.m. They added chemicals to kill algae and bacteria, a process called shocking. Midwest Pool Management, which contracts with the city, did not respond to a request for comment.

The pool is expected to reopen this week, said Lanè Johnson, Parks and Recreation spokesperson.

“The pool’s water changed color because there was no circulation for multiple days during the heat wave,” Johnson said in an email to The Star.

The water at the Mary Williams-Neal Community Center pool turned green. A Kansas City Parks and Recreation representative said damage to the pool’s pump and motor caused the color change. June 25, 2024.
The water at the Mary Williams-Neal Community Center pool turned green. A Kansas City Parks and Recreation representative said damage to the pool’s pump and motor caused the color change. June 25, 2024.

Smoke came out of the pool’s motor and pump, damaging the equipment, according to Johnson. The two elements were repaired late last week.

The Mary Williams-Neal Community Center Pool opened a new slide this year. Mayor Quinton Lucas flew down it to celebrate the start of swimming season last month. The slide, which was budgeted to cost $88,800, was funded by the city’s Public Improvements Advisory Committee.

Have more questions about public services in the Kansas City area? Ask the Service Journalism team at kcq@kcstar.com.