King Charles is Plotting Shake Up That Will Affect Prince Harry and Prince Andrew

·2 min read

It goes without saying that the line of succession in the British Royal family is quite complicated compared to, say, the United States government. Many of the rules and customs were created hundreds of years ago and continue to be updated as needed. For example, up until 2011,  male heirs took precedence over their sisters in succession – which would mean that Princess Charlotte would be behind both of her brothers. According to a new report, King Charles wants to amend another law, which he believes is necessary considering the current controversies surrounding the family. 

1

Counsellors of State Don't Have to Be Working Royals

Under the 1937 Regency Act, counselors of state may be deployed on official business if the King is predisposed. However, there is no law saying that these people have to be working members of the Royal family. As of now, the four counselors of state are the spouse of the monarch and the four adults next in line to the throne. 

2

But Because Three Out of Four Aren't, King Charles Wants to Make Changes

Currently, those people would be Queen Camilla, Prince William, Prince Harry, Prince Andrew, and Princess Beatrice. However, because three out of five of them aren't considered working royals, Prince Charles reportedly wants to amend the law. 

3

This Would Shake Things Up

This would make the four counselors of state Queen Camilla, followed by Prince William, Prince Edward, and Princess Anne. He may also redefine the role to incorporate Kate Middleton, the Princess of Wales, into the group. 

4

Prince Andrew and Prince Harry Were Previously in the Group

During Queen Elizabeth's reign, the Prince of Wales, the Duke of Cambridge, the Duke of Sussex, and the Duke of York, were all counselors of state. The Queen's late husband, the Duke of Edinburgh, was also one before his death. 

5

They Carry Out Official Duties of the Sovereign

Per the royal family, "Counsellors of State are authorised to carry out most of the official duties of the Sovereign, for example, attending Privy Council meetings, signing routine documents and receiving the credentials of new ambassadors to the United Kingdom."