You knew Idahoans were split on vaccine mandates. See what Republicans, Dems say in poll

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Idahoans have a lax view toward COVID-19, according to a new survey.

Forty-five percent of Idahoans surveyed by Boise State University said that to have no COVID-19 vaccination or testing requirement for large businesses, organizations and public events is the most sensible protocol to protect people’s health while allowing for personal freedom.

Twenty-nine percent said a choice between proof of vaccination and regular testing is most sensible. Twenty percent said vaccination should be required for everyone without a medical or religious exemption.

The university’s seventh annual Idaho Public Policy Survey was conducted from Nov. 13-21, and 1,000 Idahoans were surveyed.

Republicans and Democrats mostly disagreed on vaccination mandates. Of the 1,000 people polled, 39% identified themselves as Republicans or strong Republicans, and 14% as Democrats or strong Democrats.

Sixty-three percent of Republicans supported no COVID-19 vaccine or testing requirements, while just 13% of Democrats did.

Twenty percent of Republicans preferred a choice between the vaccine and regular testing, while 11% of Republicans thought a vaccine requirement would be best.

Forty-six percent of Democrats supported vaccine requirements, while 37% of Democrats supported a choice between a vaccine and regular testing.

Forty-five percent of Idahoans said they think the most sensible COVID-19 response for large businesses, organizations and public events is to not have any vaccine or testing requirements. The survey was conducted by Boise State University in November.
Forty-five percent of Idahoans said they think the most sensible COVID-19 response for large businesses, organizations and public events is to not have any vaccine or testing requirements. The survey was conducted by Boise State University in November.

Idaho Republican Gov. Brad Little has encouraged Idahoans to get vaccinated but has stopped short of making it a requirement. He has criticized President Joe Biden for attempting to require employees of large companies to get vaccinated. The city of Boise has required some city employees to get vaccinated for COVID-19.

The release of the survey results coincided with another spike in COVID-19 cases throughout Idaho at a time when vaccines remain a crucial part of combating the virus.

When asked if they would recommend the COVID-19 vaccine, 51% of respondents said they would and 26% said they wouldn’t. The rest of the respondents didn’t answer the question.

This question also had a strong relationship with party affiliation: Thirty-six percent of Republicans would recommend getting the vaccine, while 35% would recommend against it. The other 29% didn’t answer the question.

Among Democrats, 82% said they’d recommend the vaccine, while 13% said they wouldn’t.

Just more than half of survey respondents said they would recommend getting the COVID-19 vaccine to a friend or family member. Responses differed significantly based on political party affiliation, according to survey results.
Just more than half of survey respondents said they would recommend getting the COVID-19 vaccine to a friend or family member. Responses differed significantly based on political party affiliation, according to survey results.

The survey also asked how COVID-19 affected Idahoans economically.

As a result of the pandemic, 26% of respondents said they’ve had trouble paying bills, 15% said they’ve gotten food from a food bank or charitable organization, and 11% said they’ve received unemployment benefits.

Just more than a quarter of all respondents (26%) said their financial situation is worse now than it was when the pandemic began. Fifty-eight percent said their situation is about the same, and 15% said their situation is better.

Researchers said the sample of people surveyed was representative of the states’ population geographically and demographically. The survey had a simple random sampling margin of error of 3.1%. The survey reached respondents by cell phone (43%), landline phone (17%), online (30%) and text message (10%).

More than half of Idahoans surveyed said their financial situation is “about the same” now as it was at the start of the COVID-19 pandemic. About a quarter of Idahoans said they’ve had trouble paying bills as a result of the pandemic.
More than half of Idahoans surveyed said their financial situation is “about the same” now as it was at the start of the COVID-19 pandemic. About a quarter of Idahoans said they’ve had trouble paying bills as a result of the pandemic.

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