Las Vegas may become the first U.S. city to ban ornamental grass

Cheryl Santa Maria
·1 min read
 Las Vegas may become the first U.S. city to ban ornamental grass
Las Vegas may become the first U.S. city to ban ornamental grass

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Las Vegas may become the first city in the U.S. to ban the use of ornamental grass.

It's one way the desert-locked region is hoping to conserve water following a record-breaking 2020, a year so dry that 240 days passed without measurable rainfall in the city.

The Southern Nevada Water Authority estimates there are about square 21 square kilometres of “nonfunctional turf” in the metropolitan area and says it requires four times as much water as drought-tolerant foliage like cactus and succulents.

Getting rid of that grass could save about 53 litres of water per person a day.

Justin Jones, a Clark County commissioner who serves on the water authority’s board, tells the Associated Press (AP) officials aren't targeting homeowner properties or public parks but rather, grass that's inaccessible to pedestrians, like in the middle of a parkway.

As of now, the Southern Nevada Water Authority doesn't think the idea will catch on in other municipalities, AP says, but given the recent pattern of dry conditions affecting all communities relying on water in the Colorado river, other areas may have to enact conservation tactics in the future as well.

Thumbnail image: File photo courtesy of Pexels.