LGBTQ issues are human issues: here's why

·1 min read
Much more still needs to be done to accommodate the different standpoints and needs of the LGBTQ community in different facets of everyday life, advocates say. (Darryl Dyck/The Canadian Press - image credit)
Much more still needs to be done to accommodate the different standpoints and needs of the LGBTQ community in different facets of everyday life, advocates say. (Darryl Dyck/The Canadian Press - image credit)

Matters that impact LGBTQ people, like access to hormone therapy and safe gender-affirming surgeries, are often seen as unique.

But LGBTQ people also interact with areas of everyday society, such as education and health care, where their identities can affect their experiences.

Much more still needs to be done to accommodate the different standpoints and needs of the LGBTQ community in different facets of everyday life, advocates say.

To delve into this idea deeper, CBC's The Early Edition in Vancouver heard from some members of the LGBTQ community during July, ahead of Vancouver Pride.

These are a few of their stories.

Erasing the not so invisible divide

CBC's Kiran Singh and Xtra Magazine's Mel Woods join Stephen Quinn, host of CBC's The Early Edition, to talk about the importance of examining social issues through the experiences of LGBTQ people.

Submitted by Mel Woods
Submitted by Mel Woods

Diverse families in the school system

Serene Carter and Stevie Nguyen tell CBC's Kiran Singh about raising their 10-year-old Noah in a diverse family setting.

Kiran Singh/CBC
Kiran Singh/CBC

Accommodating all abilities and identities

Heather McCain sits down with CBC's Kiran Singh to explore the complexities intersecting identities can present when you are disabled, trans and asexual.

Kiran Singh/CBC
Kiran Singh/CBC

Losing a partner

The Early Edition host Stephen Quinn speaks to Tori Phillips and Lynda Dickson, now engaged to be wed, about the deaths of their respective former partners and how they found each other.

Ben Nelms/CBC
Ben Nelms/CBC

Activism is inclusive

Ellen Woodsworth and Joy Masuhara can be considered a power couple when it comes to advocating for marginalized communities. CBC's Stephen Quinn sits down with them to explore the idea of intersectionality in activism.

Ben Nelms/CBC
Ben Nelms/CBC
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