Uvalde shooting as it happened: Families prepare to bury victims of school attack that left 21 dead

·81 min read
A view from the makeshift memorial in front of Robb Elementary School in Uvalde, Texas, on May 25, 2022.
A view from the makeshift memorial in front of Robb Elementary School in Uvalde, Texas.Yasin Ozturk/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images
  • At least 19 children and two adults were killed Tuesday at a Texas elementary school.

  • The killing sent shockwaves through US society and prompted intense criticism of the police.

  • A father whose child was killed in the shooting has spoken out against the sale of assault rifles.

First 2 funerals for victims set to take place on Tuesday

Uvalde, Texas, is preparing to bury the first of the victims in last week's deadly attack on an elementary school.

The first two of the funerals are due to take place Tuesday, for 10-year-old Amerie Jo Garza and 10-year-old Maite Rodriguez, The Associated Press and Reuters reported.

Seventeen other children and two adults were killed when a gunman stormed into Robb Elementary School and opened fire in the classrooms. The gunman was later shot dead by police, who have faced backlash for lingering inside the school for more than an hour before confronting the shooter.


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Mo Brooks says people need guns to 'take back' the government should it ever turn 'dictatorial'

Republican Rep. Mo Brooks of Alabama, his right index finger raised, addressed a Capitol Hill press conference while standing against a backdrop of several American flags.
GOP Rep. Mo Brooks said he would only consider proposals about guns that guarantee Americans their Second Amendment right to bear and keep them.Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty Images

Rep. Mo Brooks said this weekend that he would not support any new gun control restrictions, arguing that people would need their guns if they ever had to take back power from a "dictatorial" government.

"The Second Amendment is designed to help ensure that we, the citizenry, always have the right to take back our government should it become dictatorial," he said during an appearance on Fox News Sunday.

Sandra Smith, the show's host, had asked Brooks if he was open to changes being made to existing gun laws in the wake of last Tuesday's mass shooting at the Robb Elementary School in Uvalde, Texas.

"As long as we enjoy un-infringed Second Amendment rights, then we don't really have to worry that much about the government ever becoming dictatorial," Brooks said.


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The father of a 10-year-old killed in the Uvalde mass shooting says 'assault rifles shouldn't be sold'

robb elementary school
A Texas State Trooper receives flowers for the victims of a mass shooting at Robb Elementary School.Jordan Vonderhaar/Getty Images

The father of a child who was killed in the shooting in Uvalde, Texas, last week said that "assault rifles shouldn't be sold," the Independent reported.

"We understand having an assault rifle for the military, not personal use," Jessie Rodriguez told the outlet. "Not to gun down our children … all the children gunned down like they were animals."

His daughter, 10-year-old Annabell, died in the mass shooting at Robb Elementary that left 19 children and two teachers dead. Annabell was described by family members as an honor roll student.


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School in Uvalde mass shooting may be torn down and rebuilt, Texas state senator says

Crosses bearing the names of the victims of a mass shooting in front of Robb Elementary School on May 26, 2022 in Uvalde, Texas. The rural Texas community is in mourning following a shooting at Robb Elementary School which killed 21 people including 19 children.
Crosses bearing the names of the victims of a mass shooting in front of Robb Elementary School.Photo by Jordan Vonderhaar/Getty Images

Robb Elementary School may be torn down and rebuilt after the mass shooting there last week, Texas State Sen. Roland Gutierrez told local TV station KSAT 12 on Sunday.

Gutierrez, a Democrat who represents Uvalde, told KSAT 12 that President Joe Biden promised him his support during a visit to a makeshift memorial site outside the school in Uvalde, Texas.

According to Gutierrez, Biden told him: "I'm going to bring you resources. We're going to look to raze that school down and build a new one."


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Uvalde school shooter's grandmother may never be able to speak again after he shot her in the face, relative says

texas school shooter house
The home of the suspected gunman is cordoned off with police tape.Jordan Vonderhaar/Getty Images

The Texas school shooter's first victim, his own grandmother whom he shot in the face, may never be able to talk again, a relative told The New York Post.

The 18-year-old gunman lived with his grandmother in Uvalde, Texas. He shot her on May 24 shortly before he drove to Robb Elementary School, barricaded himself in a fourth-grade classroom, and opened fire. He killed 19 children and two adults before he was shot dead by US Border Patrol agents.

His grandmother, Celia "Sally" Martinez Gonzales, is lucky to be alive, her second cousin, Jason Ybarra, told the Post.

"The bullet went into Sally's jaw just next to her mouth and shattered all her teeth," Ybarra said. "If the bullet was an inch in another direction, it would have blown her head off."


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Gunmaker whose rifle was used in Uvalde shooting reportedly runs direct-to-consumer ads aimed at younger buyers

Crime scene tape surrounds Robb Elementary School in Uvalde, Texas, Wednesday, May 25, 2022.
Crime scene tape surrounds the Robb Elementary School in Uvalde, Texas.AP Photo/Jae C. Hong

The gunmaker that made the rifle used in the Texas elementary school shooting uses online direct-to-consumer advertising tactics to attract young buyers, according to the New York Times.

Daniel Defense also runs ads modeled after the popular video game "Call of Duty," likely also aimed to appeal to a younger audience, per the Times. The Uvalde shooter bought the rifles used in the attack days after his 18th birthday.

The Times reported how Daniel Defense also runs a buy-now, pay-later scheme, which is advertised on the home page of its website.

The financing program allows buyers to spread out the cost of an assault-style rifle, some models of which retail for more than $1,800, over multiple pay periods in "three easy steps."


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Uvalde funeral homes are overwhelmed after the school shooting, so it could take weeks to bury the children killed, CNN reported

Members of the community gather at the City of Uvalde Town Square for a prayer vigil in the wake of a mass shooting at Robb Elementary School on May 24, 2022 in Uvalde, Texas.
Members of the community gather at the City of Uvalde Town Square for a prayer vigil in the wake of a mass shooting at Robb Elementary School on May 24, 2022 in Uvalde, Texas.Getty Images

Funeral homes in Uvalde, Texas, are so overwhelmed by the school mass shooting that it will take weeks to bury some of the people killed, CNN reported.

NBC News also reported that Uvalde's funeral homes are overwhelmed.

Jimmy Lucas, president of the Texas Funeral Directors Association, told NBC News that workers from further afield,  like embalmers and morticians, were coming to volunteer their time.

A funeral home in Texas also donated caskets to Uvalde.


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The parents of a child killed rejected a meeting with Texas Gov. Greg Abbott over his stance on gun control

Texas Gov. Greg Abbott speaks at a news conference in Austin, Texas on June 8, 2021.
Texas Gov. Greg Abbott speaks at a news conference in Austin, Texas on June 8, 2021.Eric Gay/AP

The parents of a 10-year-old girl killed in the Uvalde elementary school mass shooting said they declined an invitation to meet Texas Gov. Greg Abbott.

The parents of Alexandra "Lexi" Aniyah Rubio said they rejected the offer because of his refusal to support new laws to restrict access to firearms.

In an interview with The New York Times, her parents Kimberly and Felix Rubio said Abbott's officer called offering them a meeting on the day after the shooting. They said they turned it down.

"My first thought was, 'My Lexi doesn't even like him," Kimberly Rubio told the Times. "She was really little, but we talked about this stuff at home."


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Gov. Abbott announces that an anonymous donor covered funeral expenses for all Uvalde victims

People visit a memorial for the victims of the Robb Elementary School mass shooting at the City of Uvalde Town Square on May 29, 2022 in Uvalde, Texas. 19 children and two adults were killed on May 24th during a mass shooting at Robb Elementary School after man entered the school through an unlocked door and barricaded himself in a classroom where the victims were located.
People visit a memorial for the victims of the Robb Elementary School mass shooting at the City of Uvalde Town Square on May 29, 2022 in Uvalde, Texas. 19 children and two adults were killed on May 24th during a mass shooting at Robb Elementary School after man entered the school through an unlocked door and barricaded himself in a classroom where the victims were located.Michael M. Santiago/Getty Images

Texas Gov. Greg Abbott announced Friday that an anonymous donor will cover all funeral costs following the mass shooting in Uvalde, Texas.

Abbott said an anonymous individual donated $175,000 to ensure that families could pay funeral costs.


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Demonstrators outside Robb Elementary plead 'do something!' during Biden visit

US President Joe Biden and First Lady Jill Biden pay their respects at a makeshift memorial outside of Robb Elementary School in Uvalde, Texas on May 29, 2022. (Photo by CHANDAN KHANNA/AFP via Getty Images)
US President Joe Biden and First Lady Jill Biden pay their respects at a makeshift memorial outside of Robb Elementary School in Uvalde, Texas on May 29, 2022.CHANDAN KHANNA/AFP via Getty Images

President Joe Biden and First Lady Jill Biden on Sunday faced calls by protestors to take action against gun violence as the pair visited Robb Elementary School to pay respects to the 21 victims who died during a May 24 attack.

"Do something!" CNN reported demonstrators yelled at the president as he left mass at Sacred Heart Catholic Church.

"We will," Biden replied.


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Abbott blamed Texas school shooting on a lack of mental health resources. But he reportedly cut more than $200 million from the department that handles them.

Greg Abbott at vigil
Texas Governor Greg Abbott attends a vigil for the victims of the mass shooting at Robb Elementary School in Uvalde, Texas on May 25, 2022. - The tight-knit Latino community of Uvalde was wracked with grief Wednesday after a teen in body armor marched into the school and killed 19 children and two teachers, in the latest spasm of deadly gun violence in the US.ALLISON DINNER/AFP via Getty Images

Texas Gov. Greg Abbott blamed the Uvalde school shooting on mental health but cut close to $2o million from the Texas Health and Human Services Commission, which oversees mental health services, CNN reported.

In a press conference on Wednesday, Abbott attributed the rise in mass shootings to mental-health challenges. However, it's not known if the 18-year-old gunman who killed 19 children and two adults had a history of mental illness.

CNN's Pamela Brown reported that despite Abbott's assertion that the issue is tied to mental health, he's cut more than $117 million from the state's Health and Human Services Commission in 2021 to a little more than $93 million in 2022.

Across the two years, more than $200 million was cut from the departments funds to go towards supporting the National Guard and efforts on the border, per the outlet.

Mental Health America, a non-profit tracking mental health resources across the country, however, ranked Texas 50 out of 51 territories for mental health access in 2021. It also ranked 15 for adults and 30 for youth — indicating that it had high prevalence of mental health illnesses but limited care.


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Justice Department launches review into law enforcement response to the Uvalde school shooting

closeup of FBI on back of jacket
Victor Escalon, Regional Director of the Texas Department of Public Safety South, speaks during a press conference on May 26, 2022 in Uvalde, Texas.Photo by Eric Thayer/Getty Images

The Justice Department announced on Sunday that it will investigate the Uvalde school shooting that left 19 children and two teachers dead.

It comes after several lawmakers and officials have issued calls for an official investigation after local law enforcement changed their timeline of the shooting multiple times.

In at least 12 instances, police have changed the narrative of how law enforcement reacted to the 18-year-old gunman's rampage in which he killed 19 children and two teachers last Tuesday.  Local authorities claimed they responded "within minutes" to the shooting.

However, by Wednesday, officials said roughly 40 minutes to an hour passed between the time the shooter entered the premises and when he was shot and killed by a Border Patrol agent.


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The uncle of a Uvalde victim says he forgives the gunman

image of people at church
People gather at the Sacred Heart Catholic Church to pray for the victims of the mass shooting at Robb Elementary School in Uvalde, Texas on May 25, 2022.Photo by CHANDAN KHANNA/AFP via Getty Images

The uncle of a Uvalde school shooting victim says he has forgiven the gunman who killed his niece.

"I forgive him. As powerful as that, I forgive him," Adrian Alonzo told CNN about the 18-year-old gunman who killed 19 school children and two teachers at Robb Elementary school last Tuesday.

"The Bible says in Ephesians 4 that we must forgive one another, just as God has forgiven. And I hold no hatred toward him... I am filled with anger, but I feel no hatred towards him," he added.

"I can't explain the joy I had when I saw my son walk out of those doors, and I finally had him," Alonzo told CNN. "But as a parent, I wanted to squeeze him right there, but I wanted to get him out because I didn't want him to see all that."

His relief was short-lived after he found out his niece, Ellie Garcia, was unaccounted for. He begged officials for information.


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GOP Rep. Adam Kinzinger says it's a 'no brainer' to raise age requirement to purchase guns

Adam Kinzinger
Rep. Adam Kinzinger (R-IL).Andrew Harnik-Pool/Getty Images

GOP Rep. Adam Kinzinger said that raising the age requirement for gun purchases to 21 is a "no brainer" in an interview on ABC's "This Week" Sunday.

"If you look at the Parkland shooting, you look at Buffalo, you look at this shooting; these are people under the age of 21," Kinzinger said. "We know that the human brain develops and matures a lot between the age of 18 and 21."


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Families whose kids survived the Uvalde school shooting turn to crowdfunding to afford therapy

Young girls pay respect at a memorial for Uvalde shooting
Young girls pay their respects at a memorial to the victims of the Robb Elementary School mass shooting on May 28, 2022 in Uvalde, Texas.Michael M. Santiago/Getty Images

Parents and relatives of the children who survived the school shooting in Uvalde, Texas, are turning to crowdfunding websites to afford therapy.

The fundraisers came despite Texas Gov. Greg Abbott pledging state support for the victims on Friday, including a mental-health phone line.

(Abbott has a history of diverting money away from mental-health programs in Texas.)

Insider found three GoFundMe pages set up on behalf of kids who were in the classroom the gunman attacked on Tuesday. Traumatized survivors described playing dead as they watched their friends and teachers killed.

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Online threats made by Uvalde shooter went unreported to parents and were dismissed as harmless: 'kids joke around like that'

Law enforcement officers guard the scene of a shooting at Robb Elementary School in Uvalde, Texas, U.S. May 24, 2022. REUTERS/Marco Bello
Law enforcement officers at Robb Elementary School in Uvalde, Texas, on May 24, 2022.Marco Bello/Reuters

The gunman who killed 21 during a shooting at Robb Elementary School in Uvalde, Texas, on Tuesday frequently threatened people he spoke to online, but the threats were never reported to parents or authorities, The Washington Post reported.

Users who interacted with the 18-year-old shooter on the social networking apps Yubo and Instagram say he would post images of dead cats and joke about sexual assault in addition to making threats.

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Uvalde school police chief who hindered response to shooting had recent active shooter training

Uvalde Consolidated Independent School District Police Chief Pete Arredondo
Uvalde Consolidated Independent School District Police Chief Pete Arredondo.CTV News

The school district police chief who hindered the response to the mass shooting at an Uvalde, Texas, elementary school completed an active shooting training course multiple times, NBC News reported.

Texas Commission on Law Enforcement records obtained by the outlet showed Pete Arredondo completed "Active Shooter Training Mandate" in December 2021 and in August 2020. The course covers "an active shooter event and a hostage or barricade crisis."

Officials said Friday Arredondo ordered police not to confront the gunman because he thought he was barricaded and there were no more children in danger. Director of Texas Department of Public Safety Steven McCraw said it was the "wrong decision."
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An Uvalde officer said 'there was almost a mutiny' outside of the school as they debated ignoring order to not go in

Police officers stand near a makeshift memorial for the shooting victims at Robb Elementary School in Uvalde, Texas, on May 26, 2022.
Police officers stand near a makeshift memorial for the shooting victims at Robb Elementary School in Uvalde, Texas, on May 26, 2022.Chandan Khanna/AFP/Getty Images

A police officer with the Uvalde Consolidated Independent School District told People there was almost a "mutiny" as officers outside Robbs Elementary School almost ignored orders not to enter the school.

"We were like, 'There's a f---ing gunman in the school, we hear gunshots, and we're just going to stand here with our thumbs up our asses?' We wanted to go in and save lives. It was the most frustrating situation of my entire career," he told the outlet.
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Texas Lt. Gov. Dan Patrick says officials 'were not told the truth' about shooting timeline

Texas Lt. Gov. Dan Patrick speaks to Fox News about the Uvalde school shooting.
Texas Lt. Gov. Dan Patrick speaks to Fox News about the Uvalde school shooting.Fox News

Texas Lt. Gov. Dan Patrick said state officials "were not told the truth" about the timeline of the mass shooting at an Uvalde elementary school that left 21 people dead this week.

The Republican told "Fox & Friends Weekend" on Saturday that it was unclear if the officials were intentionally misinformed or if details were mis-remembered by those relaying them.

"We were told a different set of facts than we now know," he said.Read Full Story

Video: Ted Cruz was confronted after NRA conference by ex-House candidate at Houston restaurant: '19 children died! That's on your hands!'

Sen. Ted Cruz was confronted by a former congressional candidate on gun control while dining at a Houston restaurant.
Sen. Ted Cruz was confronted by a former congressional candidate on gun control while dining at a Houston restaurant.Courtesy of Benjamin Hernandez.

A video shows Sen. Ted Cruz of Texas being confronted at a restaurant following his appearance at the National Rifle Association convention in Houston.

The tense exchange came days after an 18-year-old gunman killed 19 school children and two teachers at Robb Elementary School in Uvalde, Texas on Tuesday.

"Why did you speak tonight? Why did you come here to the convention to take blood money? Why, when 19 children died? 19 children died! That's on your hands!" the video shows Benjamin Hernandez yelling at Cruz, who waved while Hernandez was dragged away by security.


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More than $2 million raised for the family of slain Uvalde teacher and husband

Robb Elementary School in Uvalde, TX
Law enforcement officers speak together outside of Robb Elementary School following the mass shooting at Robb Elementary School on May 24, 2022 in Uvalde, Texas. According to reports, 19 students and 2 adults were killed, with the gunman fatally shot by law enforcement.Brandon Bell/Getty Images

More than $2 million has been raised for the family of a Uvalde, Texas teacher, who was among those who were killed during the mass shooting earlier this week.

The GoFundMe was set up by family members of Irma Garcia, a fourth-grade teacher at Robb Elementary  School, who reportedly shielded her students during the attack. In a tweet on Tuesday, Garcia's nephew called her a "hero."

Just two days later, Garcia's husband, Joe died due to a medical emergency on May 26.

"I truly believe Joe died of a broken heart and losing the love of his life of more than 25 years was too much to bear," the fundraiser said.

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Sister of Uvalde shooter refused to buy him a gun last year, officials say

Emergency personnel gather near Robb Elementary School
Emergency personnel gather near Robb Elementary School following a shooting, Tuesday, May 24, 2022, in Uvalde, Texas.Dario Lopez-Mills/AP

The sister of the gunman who authorities say opened fire at an elementary in Uvalde, Texas declined to buy him firearms in 2021.

At a press conference on Friday, the Texas Department of Public Safety Director Colonel Steven McCraw said that he tried to get a weapon the year before, The Independent reported.

"We know that by his digital footprint that (the gunman) asked his sister to help him buy a gun, she flatly refused, that was in September 2021," McCraw said, per the outlet.

Officials previously said that the gunman, who turned 18 on May 16, bought two weapons and ammunition just after his birthday. In Texas, individuals as young as 18 can purchase rifles.

Authorities said the gunman had 60 magazines during the attack, noting that he left 31 in a bag that he did not bring inside the elementary school.


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Father of a Texas elementary shooting victim says more kids would be alive if police engaged shooter sooner

Law enforcement personnel stand outside Robb Elementary School
Law enforcement personnel stand outside Robb Elementary School following a shooting, Tuesday, May 24, 2022, in Uvalde, Texas.Dario Lopez-Mills/AP

Alfred Garza, whose 10-year-old daughter Amerie Jo was killed at Robb Elementary School in Uvalde, Texas, on Tuesday, told CNN he was in disbelief over how long it took for police to enter the school.

"It doesn't take a genius to figure out that it just took too long to get in there and, you know, had they gotten there sooner, and someone would have taken immediate action, we might have more of those children here today," Garza told CNN. "Including my daughter."

Law enforcement officials have given conflicting accounts of what happened in the approximate hour the gunman was inside the school.

While officials said that officers responded to the scene "within minutes," they didn't specify how long it took for police to engage with the shooter.

Reports and images of parents trying to push through law enforcement to rescue their children surfaced in the days following the shooting, and some parents have said police did not immediately respond when urged to enter the school.


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Trump mourns Texas school shooting victims at NRA convention, defends mass gun ownership

Former President Donald Trump speaks during the National Rifle Association (NRA) annual convention in Houston, Texas.
Former President Donald Trump speaks during the National Rifle Association (NRA) annual convention in Houston, Texas, on May 27, 2022.Brandon Bell/Getty Images

Former President Donald Trump mourned the 19 children and two teachers who were killed in Uvalde, Texas, by reading out their names to the sound of gongs on Friday.

He was speaking at the National Rifle Association annual convention in Houston, Texas.

Trump said that "evil" is the reason to arm citizens, telling attendees that "cynical politicians" now seek to "exploit the tears of sobbing families" to take away 2nd Amendment rights.

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Police chief who delayed tactical response to Uvalde school shooting to join city council

Uvalde Consolidated Independent School District Police Chief Pete Arredondo
Uvalde Consolidated Independent School District Police Chief Pete Arredondo.CTV News

Peter Arredondo, the school district police chief who officials said orders delayed the officer response to the shooting at Robb Elementary School, will join the Uvalde City Council, according to NBC News.

Arredondo was elected to the Uvalde City Council three weeks ago with nearly 70% of the vote, the Uvalde Leader-News reported.Read Full Story

Uvalde gunman's co-workers nicknamed him 'school shooter' prior to the attack

A former co-worker of the Uvalde school shooting suspect told The New York Times they and other workers at the local Wendy's had nicknamed him "school shooter" prior to the attack.

One of the co-workers said he would snap at colleagues and customers and that his long hair, dark clothing, and hostile behavior led them to call him names.Read Full Story

Uvalde gunman's mother begs people not to judge him: 'Forgive me, forgive my son'

Adriana Martinez, the mother of the Uvalde school shooting suspect, begged for forgiveness for herself and her son in a Friday interview with CNN affiliate Televisa.

"I have no words. I have no words to say. I don't know what he was thinking," Martinez said. "He had his reasons for doing what he did. And please don't judge him. I only want the innocent children who died to forgive me."Read Full Story

11-year-old Uvalde shooting survivor who played dead after calling 911 said she doesn't understand why the police stayed outside as the gunman's rampage continued

Police officers stand near a makeshift memorial for the shooting victims at Robb Elementary School in Uvalde, Texas, on May 26, 2022.
Police officers stand near a makeshift memorial for the shooting victims at Robb Elementary School in Uvalde, Texas, on May 26, 2022.Chandan Khanna/AFP/Getty Images

Amid disturbing reports that Texas police refused to send officers into the elementary school where a mass shooting was unfolding for nearly an hour on Tuesday, a fourth-grade girl who survived the massacre said she can't understand why law enforcement officials didn't come rescue her and her classmates sooner.

Eleven-year-old Miah Cerrillo shared a heartbreaking account of the time that passed in her classroom at Robb Elementary School in Uvalde, Texas after an 18-year-old gunman opened fire, killing 19 of her classmates and two teachers.

As the attack unfolded Cerrillo covered herself in her dying friend's blood to play dead in a desperate attempt to survive. The ordeal felt like three agonizing hours, the young girl told CNN this week.

Despite calling 911 and speaking with dispatch, Miah said she initially thought the police somehow hadn't arrived yet as she lay waiting among her classmates for nearly an hour.

It was only after the shooting, that Miah said she heard grownups talking about how the police had actually been standing outside the school while the gunman's rampage continued.

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Federal agents eventually decided to ignore local police and enter the school: report

Police walk near Robb Elementary School following a shooting, Tuesday, May 24, 2022, in Uvalde, Texas.
Police walk near Robb Elementary School following a shooting, Tuesday, May 24, 2022, in Uvalde, Texas.AP Photo/Dario Lopez-Mills

The federal agents that killed the gunman waited 30 minutes before disobeying orders and entering the school, NBC News reported.

Senior officials from the tactical unit of US Customs and Border Protection had been told not to enter the school by local police, but ultimately "of their own volition," led additional officers inside the school, per the outlet, citing a report.


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10-year-old Uvalde survivor says 'almost all' of his friends died in the shooting

Crosses with the names of Tuesday's shooting victims are placed outside Robb Elementary School in Uvalde, Texas, Thursday, May 26, 2022.
Crosses with the names of Tuesday's shooting victims are placed outside Robb Elementary School in Uvalde, Texas, Thursday, May 26, 2022.Jae C. Hong/Associated Press

A 4th-grade boy who survived the Uvalde shooting by hiding with his classmates near students' backpacks said "almost all" of his friends were killed in the "terrifying" attack.

Jayden Perez, 10, described his experience trying to hide from the shooter with several of his classmates, telling CNN that concealing themselves with backpacks or under a table didn't stop some of the children from getting hurt.

"The shooter shot through the window and hurt my friend and teacher," he told the outlet.


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Abbott said he is 'livid' about receiving inaccurate Uvalde shooting info from law enforcement, who have changed timeline at least 12 times since Tuesday

Texas officials sit on a stage giving a press conference.
Texas Gov. Greg Abbott speaks during a press conference at Uvalde High School on May 25, 2022 in Uvalde, Texas.Photo by Jordan Vonderhaar/Getty Images

During a press conference in Uvalde on Friday, Texas Governor Greg Abbott claimed that law enforcement officials who responded to the scene of the Robb Elementary School shooting provided him with inaccurate information.

"Yes. I was misled. I am livid about what happened," Abbott said. "The information I was given turned out, in part, to be inaccurate, and I am absolutely livid about that."

He claimed that partially false information he may have shared was just a "recitation" of his handwritten notes from early briefings after the shooting.

Local and state law enforcement agencies who responded to the shooting have changed their timeline of events at least twelve times since Tuesday, orchestrating a slow, at times conflicting flow of information about the tragic shooting, according to an Insider review of statements.


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The Uvalde school police chief refused to send cops into the building during the massacre: authorities

Uvalde Consolidated Independent School District Police Chief Pete Arredondo
Uvalde Consolidated Independent School District Police Chief Pete Arredondo.CTV News

The chief of police of the Uvalde, Texas, school district initially told the public there were "some deaths" in the wake of the Robb Elementary School mass shooting that left 19 children and two teachers dead.

Now a top Texas law enforcement official says that that same person — Uvalde Consolidated Independent School District Police Chief Pete Arredondo — was the on-scene commander during Tuesday's massacre who authorities said wrongly made the call to delay authorities from breaching the classroom where the gunman carried out the deadliest US school shooting in a decade.


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Fox News contributor defends police response, saying it's 'a little unfair' how reporters are questioning authorities

Former Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) acting director Thomas Homan pictured daily briefing at the White House in 2017.
Former Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) acting director Thomas Homan pictured daily briefing at the White House in 2017.Jonathan Ernst/Reuters

A Fox News contributor defended the police response to Tuesday's mass shooting at Robb Elementary School in Uvalde, Texas, that left 19 children and two adults dead, saying it's "a little unfair" how reporters are questioning authorities' shifting timelines.

"There's a lot of cops here that did a lot of the right things and overall saved a lot of lives," Tom Homan, former acting director of Immigration and Customs Enforcement, said on air on Friday. "There's going to be lessons learned — I think there's going to be some mistakes that were made."

Police have faced backlash over allegations that officers did not go after the 18-year-old gunman quickly enough. Officials have also given conflicting accounts about the timeline of the shooting.

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A school police officer drove past the Texas gunman and accidentally confronted a teacher instead, cops say

Law enforcement officers speak to a man outside of Robb Elementary School in Uvalde, Texas, on May 24, 2022
Law enforcement officers speak to a man outside of Robb Elementary School in Uvalde, Texas, on May 24, 2022Allison Dinner/AFP via Getty Images

Texas law enforcement officers said a school resource officer drove past the 18-year-old gunman outside Robb Elementary School and accidentally confronted a teacher instead.

After a teacher called police to report that the gunman had crashed his vehicle in a ditch at 11:30 a.m. on Tuesday, the gunman then began shooting at the school, Director of Texas Department of Public Safety Steven McCraw told reporters on Friday

The school resource officer — who was not at Robb Elementary at the time — heard the 911 call and drove to the back of the school. The officer sped over to who he thought was the gunman, but it turned out to be a teacher, McGraw said.

The officer actually drove right past the gunman — who was hiding behind a vehicle and then started shooting at the school before entering the building through an open door, McGraw said.

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A Texas student begged 911 twice to 'send police now' as the gunman lurked in the school for nearly an hour

Police walk near Robb Elementary School following a shooting, Tuesday, May 24, 2022, in Uvalde, Texas.
Police walk near Robb Elementary School following a shooting, Tuesday, May 24, 2022, in Uvalde, Texas.AP Photo/Dario Lopez-Mills

One elementary school student in Uvalde, Texas, begged 911 twice to "send police now" as the gunman lurked in her school, killing 19 students and 2 teachers before police finally stopped him.

Students at Robb Elementary School made at least eight calls to 911 after the gunman burst into classrooms and opened fire on Tuesday.

Speaking to reporters Friday, Director of Texas DPS Steven McCraw, gave a timeline of 911 calls that took place between the time the shooter entered rooms 111 and 112 at Robb Elementary and the time a US Border Patrol Agent shot and killed him.

The first 911 call from inside the school came at 12:03 p.m. from a girl in room 112, McCraw said. Though he did not identify her, it has been widely reported that a student grabbed her dead teacher's phone after the woman was shot and made a call to 911.

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Authorities say security video shows the back door of Texas school was propped open by a teacher just before the gunman attacked the school

Crime scene tape surrounds Robb Elementary School in Uvalde, Texas, Wednesday, May 25, 2022.
Crime scene tape surrounds Robb Elementary School in Uvalde, Texas, Wednesday, May 25, 2022.AP Photo/Jae C. Hong

Security footage from Robb Elementary School in Texas shows that a back door was propped open by a teacher before Tuesday's deadly mass shooting, Texas law enforcement officials said.

At 11:27 a.m. on Tuesday morning, the door that police believe was used by the 18-year-old gunman to enter the school was propped open by a teacher, Director of Texas Department of Public Safety Steven McCraw said at a Friday press conference.

McCraw said the detail was confirmed through "video evidence."

After the gunman crashed his vehicle in a ditch just a minute later, the teacher ran to get a phone and walked back to the propped-open door.

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Texas authorities says cops didn't go in to stop the shooter because the commander thought 'there were no more children at risk'

Robb Elementary School in Uvalde, TX
Law enforcement officers speak together outside of Robb Elementary School following the mass shooting at Robb Elementary School on May 24, 2022 in Uvalde, Texas. According to reports, 19 students and 2 adults were killed, with the gunman fatally shot by law enforcement.Brandon Bell/Getty Images

A Texas law enforcement official said police who arrived at Robb Elementary School didn't immediately confront the gunman because the commander, Uvalde Consolidated Independent School District Police Chief Pete Arredondo, thought the risk to school children was over.

"The on-scene commander at the time believed that it had transitioned from an active shooter to a barricaded subject," Director of Texas Department of Public Safety Steven McCraw said at a Friday press conference, adding that the commander "considered a barricaded subject and that there was time and there were no more children at risk."

McGraw added: "Obviously, based upon the information we have, there were children in that classroom that were at risk and it was still, in fact, an active shooter situation."


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Police deny GOP congressman's allegation that the Texas school gunman was previously arrested and warned he'd shoot up a school in 2022

A view from the makeshift memorial in front of Robb Elementary School in Uvalde, Texas, on May 25, 2022.
A view from the makeshift memorial in front of Robb Elementary School in Uvalde, Texas, on May 25, 2022.Yasin Ozturk/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images

Texas law enforcement authorities on Friday denied claims by a local GOP congressman that the Uvalde elementary school gunman was once arrested years ago for threatening to "shoot up" a school once he turned 18.

Texas GOP Rep. Tony Gonzales claimed during a Fox News interview earlier Friday that he "found out" that the 18-year-old gunman was arrested four years ago "for having this plan, for basically saying, you know, 'when I'm a senior in 2022, I am going to shoot up a school.'"

Officials with the Texas Department of Public Safety said during a press briefing that the allegations by Texas GOP Rep. Tony Gonzales were not correct.


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Texas police wouldn't let a tactical squad of federal agents go into the school to stop the gunman, NYT reports

Law enforcement officers guard the scene of a shooting at Robb Elementary School in Uvalde, Texas, U.S. May 24, 2022. REUTERS/Marco Bello
Law enforcement officers at Robb Elementary School in Uvalde, Texas, on May 24, 2022.Marco Bello/Reuters

Texas police who responded to Tuesday's mass shooting at a Uvalde, Texas, elementary school wouldn't let a tactical squad of federal agents immediately go into the school to stop the gunman, two officials briefed on the situation told New York Times.

The officials told the Times that the Border Patrol and Immigration and Customs Enforcement tactical team was forced to wait nearly an hour before they went in and shot and killed the gunman, who massacred 19 children and two adults at Robb Elementary School.


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Abbott cancels plans to attend NRA event in person

In this June 8, 2021, file photo, Texas Gov. Greg Abbott speaks at a news conference in Austin, Texas.
In this June 8, 2021, file photo, Texas Gov. Greg Abbott speaks at a news conference in Austin, Texas.AP Photo/Eric Gay, File

Texas Gov. Greg Abbott canceled plans to give an in-person speech at an annual NRA event held just 300 miles from the site of the deadly Uvalde school shooting.

Abbott had faced questions of whether he would attend the gun-focused event just days after a shooter killed 19 children and 2 adults at a Texas elementary school.

However, Abbott will send a pre-recorded speech to be screened at the gun-rights lobby's annual meeting.

Former President Donald Trump, meanwhile, said he wouldn't cancel plans to attend the meeting and will still give his speech.


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Playing dead and hiding: Traumatized children who survived the shooting recount the horrors

A girl sits in front of a cross holding her knees and crying.
A girl mourns at a makeshift memorial outside Uvalde County Courthouse in Uvalde, Texas, on May 26, 2022.Photo by CHANDAN KHANNA/AFP via Getty Images

First-hand accounts from the tragedy and its aftermath have begun to emerge.

A fourth-grade boy who survived the shooting told KENS 5 about the harrowing moments he and his classmates first realized they were under attack. After firing a shot at an adjoining door, the shooter walked into the young boy's classroom, he said.

"He came in and he crouched a little bit and he said, he said 'It's time to die,'" the fourth-grader told the outlet.

He said that he and his friends hid: "I was telling my friend to not talk because he is going to hear us."

Families also described learning about the shooting.


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Sen. Bill Cassidy claims people need AR-15s to defend themselves from 'feral pigs'

Bill Cassidy
Sen. Bill Cassidy of Louisiana.AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite

Louisiana Sen. Bill Cassidy said he thought people still needed assault weapons to kill "feral pigs," inadvertently echoing an old meme about gun control.

He was asked by Vice News why someone would ever need an AR-15 — the weapon used by the gunman in Tuesday's mass shooting.

"If you talk to the people that own it, killing feral pigs in the, whatever, the middle of Louisiana. They'll wonder: 'Why would you take it away from me?'" Cassidy told Vice.

Cassidy's remarks inadvertently referenced a meme from 2019 involving a hypothetical argument on Twitter made in support of keeping assault weapons legal.


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Video shows Ted Cruz storming off after British journalist asks why mass shootings happen 'only in America'

Ted Cruz at CPAC
Sen. Ted Cruz of Texas attends the Conservative Political Action Conference on February 24, 2022 in Orlando, Florida.Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Sen. Ted Cruz of Texas walked away in the middle of an interview when he was asked by a British journalist why mass shootings take place so often "only in America."

In the video, Sky News journalist Mark Stone asked Cruz if this was "the moment to reform gun laws."

Cruz responded by saying "You know, it's easy to go to politics."

Stone later asked Cruz: "But why does this only happen in your country? I really think that's what many people are around the world, just they cannot fathom why only in America? Why is this American exceptionalism so awful?"

Cruz responded: "You know, I'm sorry you think American exceptionalism is awful. You know what? You get your political agenda, god love you," and walked away.


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Debunking the baseless QAnon conspiracy theory that the Texas school shooting was a false flag operation

A young girl prays in front of a memorial site.
Children pray and pay their respects at a memorial site for the victims killed in this week's elementary school shooting in Uvalde, Texas, Thursday, May 26, 2022.AP Photo/Dario Lopez-Mills

A baseless conspiracy theory is brewing in QAnon circles, positing without evidence that Tuesday's Texas school shooting was a false flag attack.

The ridiculous claims began brewing on Telegram groups hours after the attack, with QAnon influencers weighing in on the massacre that has claimed the lives of at least 21 people, including 19 children.

Both the Poynter Institute and Politifact have debunked the false claims that the shooting was staged. However, that has not stopped QAnon influencers from casting doubt on the tragedy.


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Trauma surgeon chokes up while talking about how her team is treating injured victims

Crosses with the names of Tuesday's shooting victims are placed outside Robb Elementary School in Uvalde, Texas, Thursday, May 26, 2022.
Crosses with the names of Tuesday's shooting victims are placed outside Robb Elementary School in Uvalde, Texas.Jae C. Hong/Associated Press

A trauma surgeon in Texas became emotional while talking about how she and other medical staff were treating victims of Tuesday's mass shooting at the Robb Elementary School in Uvalde.

In an on-air interview with CBS News, Lilian Liao, the director of pediatric trauma at the University Hospital in San Antoni, gave an update on the victims received at the hospital.

"I think our current focus is taking care of the patients that we did receive," she told the outlet while choking up. "And taking care of them in a way that we can help them, first of all, get out of the hospital, but also to be able to live their life to the fullest."


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Texas official sparks outrage after saying investigation into Uvalde school shooting was keeping him away from his children

Robb Elementary School in Uvalde, TX
Law enforcement officers speak together outside of Robb Elementary School following the mass shooting at Robb Elementary School on May 24, 2022 in Uvalde, Texas. According to reports, 19 students and 2 adults were killed, with the gunman fatally shot by law enforcement.Brandon Bell/Getty Images

A top Texas law enforcement official sparked outrage when he suggested that investigation work on the Uvalde school shooting kept him away from his children.

"I'm a father. I can't go home tonight and hug my kids. That hurts," Victor Escalon, the South Texas regional director for the state Department of Public Safety, said during a press conference on Thursday.

Pointing to his colleagues standing behind him, he added: "The members behind me — our family members. Their kids. It's tough. It's hard. But that gives us the motivation to move on to do good work for Uvalde, Texas."

Escalon's comments sparked fury on social media, with people calling him out for being insensitive.


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Texas gunman's father says his son should have killed him instead of massacring elementary school students

A man prays in front of a makeshift memorial outside Robb Elementary School in Uvalde, Texas, on May 25, 2022.
A man prays in front of a makeshift memorial outside Robb Elementary School in Uvalde, Texas.Photo by Yasin Ozturk/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images

The father of the gunman who killed 21 people — including 19 children — at the Robb Elementary School in Texas said that his son should have killed him instead of shooting up the school.

In an interview with The Daily Beast published on Thursday, Salvador Ramos, 42, said that he never expected his son, who shares his name, to do something so violent.

"I just want the people to know I'm sorry man, for what my son did," Ramos told the outlet.


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It took an hour for cops to stop the Texas school shooter. Experts say seconds matter when dealing with shooting victims.

Experts told Insider that urgency matters when responding to a crisis situation.

"The understanding is, the longer the threat and suspect is allowed to be on the premises, the more lives will be lost," Alex del Carmen, an associate dean of Tarleton State University's School of Criminology, told Insider. "If you have someone armed and shooting at victims there is no 'let's pause and get backup.'"

Del Carmen said that officers are trained to "engage with or shoot at the suspect and neutralize the threat."

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Police told kids at Texas school to 'yell if you need help.' When one did, the gunman came over and shot her, another student says

Law enforcement officers guard the scene of a shooting at Robb Elementary School in Uvalde, Texas, U.S. May 24, 2022. REUTERS/Marco Bello
Law enforcement officers at Robb Elementary School in Uvalde, Texas, on May 24, 2022.Marco Bello/Reuters

A fourth-grader who survived the shooting shared harrowing details of what they saw to local outlet KENS 5.

The boy told the local news station that he and a classmate hid from the gunman under a table.

"When the cops came, the cop said: 'Yell if you need help!' And one of the persons in my class said 'help.' The guy overheard and he came in and shot her," the boy told KENS 5. "The cops barged into that classroom. The guy shot at the cops. And the cops started shooting."

He told the local outlet that he didn't come out from under the table until the gunman stopped shooting and the cops entered the room.

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If guns were the solution, 'we would be the safest country in the world' White House Press Secretary Karine Jean-Pierre says

Karine Jean-Pierre
White House press secretary Karine Jean-Pierre.AP Photo/Andrew Harnik

During a briefing Thursday, White House Press secretary Karine Jean-Pierre noted that America has more guns than any other country in the world.

"If more guns were indeed the solution, we would be the safest country in the world," she said. "But we are not."

"They should be losing their first teeth, not losing their lives," she said, adding that some parents had to give DNA samples to help identify their children. "These parents should be planning their kids' summer, not their child's funeral,"

A mother who was handcuffed outside the Texas school shooting later ran into the school and pulled her two children to safety: report

Members of the community gather at the City of Uvalde Town Square for a prayer vigil in the wake of a mass shooting at Robb Elementary School on May 24, 2022 in Uvalde, Texas.
Members of the community gather at the City of Uvalde Town Square for a prayer vigil in the wake of a mass shooting at Robb Elementary School on May 24, 2022 in Uvalde, Texas.Getty Images

A Texas mother of two students at Robb Elementary School pushed past a police line and jumped a fence, rescuing her two children during Tuesday's mass shooting in Uvalde, according to The Wall Street Journal.

Angeli Rose Gomez, a farm supervisor working nearby who has children in second and third grade at Robb, told the Journal that she drove 40 miles to the school when she heard about the shooting, only to see an apparent lack of response from law enforcement as the gunman barricaded himself in a classroom.

"The police were doing nothing," Gomez told The Journal. "They were just standing outside the fence. They weren't going in there or running anywhere."


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Meghan Markle laid flowers to honor the Texas school shooting victims in a surprise visit to a Uvalde memorial

Britain's Duchess of Sussex, Meghan Markle pays respect at a makeshift memorial outside Uvalde County Courthouse in Uvalde, Texas, on May 26, 2022.
Britain's Duchess of Sussex, Meghan Markle pays respect at a makeshift memorial outside Uvalde County Courthouse in Uvalde, Texas, on May 26, 2022.Yasin Ozturk/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images

Meghan Markle made a surprise visit to Uvalde, Texas, to pay tribute to the victims of the Robb Elementary School shooting, a spokesperson for the Duchess of Sussex told Insider.

As part of her visit, the Duchess of Sussex laid flowers at a memorial outside the Uvalde County Courthouse on Thursday. She placed the bouquet in front of the memorial for 10-year-old Uziyah Garcia.

As a mother of two, Meghan took the trip in a "personal capacity" to offer condolences and support the grieving community in person, the spokesperson said.


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CNN reporter calls out Texas police official at school shooting press conference: 'We've been given a lot of bad information'

Victor Escalon, Regional Director of the Texas Department of Public Safety South.
Victor Escalon, Regional Director of the Texas Department of Public Safety South.AP Photo/Dario Lopez-Mills

A CNN reporter on Thursday called out a Texas law enforcement official, saying reporters have been given "bad information" during a press briefing about the shooting.

"Our job is to report the facts and later we can answer those questions. I don't have enough information," Texas Department of Public Safety South Texas Regional Director Victor Escalon admitted during the press conference as he was unable to provide solid answers to several pressing questions about Tuesday's massacre.

Reporters at the briefing nearby Robb Elementary School grew increasingly frustrated when Escalon could not answer certain questions about the police response to the carnage and were given conflicting reports by the state agency.


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Texas police now say a school district police officer did not confront the gunman before the Uvalde school shooting

Robb Elementary School in Uvalde, TX
Law enforcement officers speak together outside of Robb Elementary School following the mass shooting at Robb Elementary School on May 24, 2022 in Uvalde, Texas. According to reports, 19 students and 2 adults were killed, with the gunman fatally shot by law enforcement.Brandon Bell/Getty Images

Victor Escalon, the South Texas regional director for the state Department of Public Safety, told reporters at a Thursday press conference that a school district police officer did not confront the suspect before he entered Robb Elementary School, disputing previous reports.

"It was reported that a school district police officer confronted the suspect," Escalon said. "That's not accurate," he added. "[The gunman] walked in unobstructed initially."

"I just want to clear that up, that's very important," he continued.


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Police chief says Uvalde police responded 'within minutes' to Texas school shooting but doesn't address accusations that cops refused to enter the building

A Texas State Police officer walks outside Robb Elementary School
A Texas State Police officer walks outside Robb Elementary School following a shooting, Tuesday, May 24, 2022, in Uvalde, Texas.Dario Lopez-Mills/AP

The Uvalde Police Chief said in a statement shared Thursday that officers responded to the shooting at Robb Elementary School "within minutes," but did not address whether those officers went inside the school building.

The department is facing backlash after parents alleged that police officers at the school wouldn't go inside to stop the shooter.

"It is important for our community to know that our officers responded within minutes alongside Uvalde CISD officers," Chief of Police Daniel Rodriguez said in the statement. 

Rodriguez said that two UPD officers that responded to the scene were shot by the suspect. Neither is facing life-threatening injuries.

It is also not clear when the pair of officers were shot, and whether the gunman had already breached the building at the time.

"I understand questions are surfacing regarding the details of what occurred," Rodriguez said in the statement. "Rest assured that with the completion of the full investigation I will be able to answer all the questions that we can."


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Police training experts say if the Uvalde cops didn't storm the school, they weren't following industry-standard protocols

Experts on police training told Insider that officers in Uvalde, Texas — whom onlookers accused of delaying storming Robb Elementary School after a gunman entered the building — would not have been following the industry standard of training.

Alex del Carmen, the associate dean of the School of Criminology at Tarleton State University in Stephenville, Texas, told Insider that the "universally accepted standard is that when an active shooter shows up, what will happen is law enforcement will engage the suspect until he is neutralized."

Del Carmen said police are often taught to follow and engage a suspect until there is no longer a threat.

Kalfani Turè, policing expert and assistant professor of criminology at Mount Saint Mary's University in Maryland, agreed, telling Insider: "You've got to pursue."


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The Texas school shooter was able to barricade himself in a classroom despite the district's security plan including police officers and locked doors

A gunman who fatally shot 19 children and two adults at Robb Elementary School in Uvalde, Texas, earlier this week was able to barricade himself into a classroom despite the district's comprehensive security plan that includes employing police officers, monitoring social media, and locking doors.

According to the Uvalde Consolidated Independent School District's preventative security measures, the 21-point plan is in place to address and eliminate "problems of violence, vandalism, disruptions, and fear" in its classrooms.

The plan says that the UCISD employs four police officers — a chief, a detective, and two officers. There is also supposed to be security staff on "secondary campuses," the plan says, who "patrol door entrances, parking lots and perimeters of the campuses."

The plan says that Robb and other elementary schools are fenced in to limit who has access to the campus. District schools also have security vestibules with outside door buzz-in systems at their front doors, the plan says.

The plan also says that staff and students are regularly trained on what to do when there is a threat on campus, and teachers are "instructed to keep their classroom doors closed and locked at all times."


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Local Uvalde newspaper prints blank front page two days after school shooting left 21 dead

Two days after a gunman attacked Robb Elementary School in Uvalde, Texas, the Uvalde Leader-News ran a blank front page.

An image of the May 26 issue, tweeted by NBC News reporter Suzanne Gamboa, shows a plain black front page.

The only words on the page read "May 24, 2022" in white — the day of the shooting.

 

Desperate onlookers urged police to charge into the school where their children were trapped. Instead, police massed outside the building for 40 minutes and waited.

Onlookers urged the police to charge into the school school after the gunman.

The gunman was killed at the scene by law enforcement around 40 minutes after he first entered the building, officials said, the AP reported.

Javier Cazares, whose fourth-grade daughter, Jacklyn Cazares, was killed in the attack, said he raced to the school when he heard about the shooting and he arrived as officers collected outside the building.

He was annoyed that police were not moving in and raised the idea of charging into the school with several other bystanders.

Other witnesses shouted at officers to go in.

Police said there was not enough manpower at the scene when the gunman first barricaded himself in a classroom to engage with him.


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'American Pie' singer Don McLean pulls out of performing at NRA convention after the shooting.

Don McLean
Don McLean in New York in March 2018.REUTERS/Brendan McDermid

The singer Don McLean said he will no longer perform at the National Rifle Association's convention in Houston, Texas, after a mass shooting in a Texas elementary school.

The Tuesday mass shooting at the Robb Elementary School in Uvalde, Texas left at least 19 children and two teachers dead. The suspected gunman was killed at the scene by law enforcement officers. The NRA convention is set to be held from May 27 to May 29.

A representative for McLean said in a statement to the Portland Press Herald on Wednesday: "In light of the recent events in Texas, I have decided it would be disrespectful and hurtful for me to perform for the NRA at their convention in Houston this week."


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Comfort dogs are being deployed to Texas to offer support to people impacted by the shooting

LCC K-9 Comfort Dogs serving Uvalde
Facebook/LCC K-9 Comfort Dogs, @LCCK9Abner

Eight comfort dogs have been deployed to Uvalde, Texas, to offer support to anyone affected by Tuesday's mass shooting at the Robb Elementary School.

The dogs, all golden retrievers, are part of the K-9 Comfort Dog Ministry, a program run by Lutheran Church Charities to provide support to people impacted by disasters. They were due to arrive in Uvalde on Wednesday.

The dogs will be there "to be with the families, survivors, and all of the first responders who serve them," the post read.


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2 Republican lawmakers are skipping the NRA's upcoming event but said it's not because of the Texas school shooting

Rep. Dan Crenshaw, a Republican of Texas, stands outside the US Capitol
Texas Rep. Dan Crenshaw will still be in Ukraine when the NRA's leadership conference in Houston kicks off.Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call

Two Republican lawmakers confirmed on Wednesday that they would not be attending an upcoming event hosted by the National Rifle Association in Houston, Texas.

However, the reasons they cited for missing the NRA's leadership conference this weekend were unrelated to Tuesday's mass shooting at the Robb Elementary School in Uvalde, Texas.


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Texas shooter's grandfather says he wasn't aware his grandson had purchased AR-15 rifles

Police walk near Robb Elementary School following a shooting, Tuesday, May 24, 2022, in Uvalde, Texas.
Police walk near Robb Elementary School following Tuesday's shooting.AP Photo/Dario Lopez-Mills

The grandfather of the gunman behind Tuesday's mass shooting at the Robb Elementary School in Uvalde, Texas, has spoken out about his grandson.

In a video interview, Rolando Reyes, 72, told ABC's Matt Gutman that he did not know his grandson had recently bought two AR-15 rifles.

"I don't like weapons. I cannot be around weapons," Reyes told the outlet. "I hate when I see all the news, all those people that get shot. I'm against all that."

"If I had known, I would've reported him," he said.


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Texas Gov. Greg Abbott says the Uvalde school massacre 'could've been worse'

Texas Governor Greg Abbott speaks during the Houston Region Business Coalition's monthly meeting on October 27, 2021 in Houston, Texas.
Texas Gov. Greg Abbott on Wednesday suggested that the Texas school massacre "could've been worse."Photo by Brandon Bell/Getty Images

Texas Gov. Greg Abbott said at a press conference on Wednesday that the Uvalde school massacre "could've been worse."

Speaking about the events of the shooting, Abbott lauded law enforcement officers, saying that without their intervention, the tragedy would likely have had worse consequences.

"Let me emphasize something that I know you all know. The reality is, as horrible as what happened, it could have been worse," Abbott said.

"The reason it was not worse is because law enforcement officials did what they do. They showed amazing courage by running toward gunfire for the singular purpose of trying to save lives," he added.


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Desperate parents urged police to charge into the school where their children were trapped

Group of young people at a prayer vigil in Uvalde, Texas.
People listen to a message during a prayer vigil for the Robb Elementary School shooting victims in Uvalde, Texas.AP Photo/Jae C. Hong

Frustrated onlookers urged police officers to charge into the Texas elementary school where a gunman's rampage killed 19 children and two teachers, witnesses said Wednesday, as investigators worked to track the massacre that lasted upwards of 40 minutes and ended when a Border Patrol team killed the 18-year-old shooter.

"Go in there! Go in there!" nearby women shouted at the officers soon after the attack began, said Juan Carranza, 24, who saw the scene from outside his house, across the street from Robb Elementary School in the close-knit town of Uvalde.

Carranza said the officers did not go in.


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A group of students was watching a Disney movie when the Texas school shooting began, says teacher: report

A view from the makeshift memorial in front of Robb Elementary School in Uvalde, Texas, on May 25, 2022.
A view from the makeshift memorial in front of Robb Elementary School in Uvalde, Texas, on May 25, 2022.Yasin Ozturk/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images

A group of students was watching a Disney movie when gunfire began at Robb Elementary School on Tuesday, a teacher told NBC News.

Speaking to the outlet on condition of anonymity, the teacher said that her students had been enjoying the film on Tuesday morning as part of their year-end celebration. Then, shooting exploded down the hall.

Immediately, the teacher ran to lock the classroom door and ordered the kids to stay under their desks, per NBC.

"They've been practicing for this day for years," the teacher told the outlet, referring to their active shooter exercises. "They knew this wasn't a drill. We knew we had to be quiet or else we were going to give ourselves away."


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Texas State Sen. gets emotional describing the 'uncontrollable crying' of shooting victims' parents

People sit on the curb outside of Robb Elementary School as State troopers guard the area in Uvalde, Texas, on May 24, 2022.
People sit on the curb outside of Robb Elementary School as State troopers guard the area in Uvalde, Texas, on Tuesday.Photo by ALLISON DINNER/AFP via Getty Images

Texas State Sen. Roland Gutierrez recounted the harrowing experience of hearing the "uncontrollable crying" of the parents of shooting victims waiting at the reunification center in Uvalde to find out if their children were still alive.

"I went to the reunification center, and I saw families that were waiting to hear whether their child was dead or alive," Gutierrez told MSNBC on Wednesday. "As people were informed that their child was deceased, you heard uncontrollable crying."

"They were sitting there huddled with their families praying. I cannot believe that we're living in this nightmare right now," Gutierrez said.


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Texas med aide says he learned about his daughter's death from one of her classmates who was 'covered in blood'

robb elementary school
UVALDE, TX - MAY 25: A Texas State Trooper receives flowers for the victims of a mass shooting yesterday at Robb Elementary School.Photo by Jordan Vonderhaar/Getty Images

A father whose 10-year-old daughter was killed in the Tuesday mass shooting at Robb Elementary School in Uvalde, Texas, said he learned about her death when he arrived on the scene of the crime and encountered one of her friends.

Angel Garza, a med aide, told CNN's Anderson Cooper that he began assisting first responders as soon as he arrived at the school.

Garza said he saw one little girl who was "just covered in blood" from "head to toe" and went to ask her if she was okay.

"She was hysterical saying that they shot her best friend, they killed her best friend, that she's not breathing," Garza said through tears. "That she was trying to call the cops. And I asked the little girl the name and she said Amerie."


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Border Patrol agents had difficulty entering the classroom where the Texas gunman had barricaded himself, AP reported

During the Tuesday attack at Robb Elementary School, the Texas gunman had barricaded himself into a classroom by locking the door, Department of Public Safety Lt. Christopher Olivarez told CNN.

The shooter went on to shoot children and teachers inside the classroom, and all of those killed were in the same room, per Olivarez.

Rep. Tony Gonzales, who represents the district that includes Uvalde, told CNN that the gunman was in the classroom for about a half-hour, citing a briefing he received on the incident.

"And then (the shooting) stops, and he barricades himself in. That's where there's kind of a lull in the action," Gonzales said. "All of it, I understand, lasted about an hour, but this is where there's kind of a 30-minute lull. They feel as if they've got him barricaded in. The rest of the students in the school are now leaving."

Border Patrol agents responding to the shooting had difficulty breaching the classroom door, eventually entering after a staff member opened the room with a key, a law enforcement official told the Associated Press.

Texas suspect was in school during shooting for 40 to 60 minutes, per CNN

Flowers are placed on a makeshift memorial in front of Robb Elementary School in Uvalde, Texas, on May 25, 2022.
Flowers are placed on a makeshift memorial in front of Robb Elementary School in Uvalde, Texas, on May 25, 2022.Photo by CHANDAN KHANNA/AFP via Getty Images

CNN reported that when a Uvalde school district resource officer "engaged" the shooting suspect as he arrived at the school, the gunman dropped a black bag filled with ammunition and ran into the school, opening fire between 11:30 a.m. and 11:41 a.m. local time.

"They breached it, engaged the active shooter, and continued to keep him pinned down in that location afterwards until a tactical team could be put together," Texas Department of Public Safety Director Steve McCraw said on Tuesday, noting the tactical team included border patrol agents, local police officers, and sheriffs.

On Tuesday, McCraw said that the gunman was shot and killed roughly 40 minutes after his encounter with the school resource officer, and CNN reported that the shooting suspect was inside the school for 40 to 60 minutes before he was shot and killed.

 

Two 10-year-old-cousins in the same class were among the students killed in Texas school shooting

Law enforcement personnel stand outside Robb Elementary School
Law enforcement personnel stand outside Robb Elementary School following a shooting, Tuesday, May 24, 2022, in Uvalde, Texas.Dario Lopez-Mills/AP

Two young cousins in the same classroom at Robb Elementary School were both killed in the Tuesday mass shooting that left 21 people dead, including 19 children, in Uvalde, Texas.

Family members confirmed that Jacklyn Cazares and Annabell Rodríguez, both 10, were fatally shot.

Polly Flores, who was Jackie's aunt and Annabelle's great-aunt, told The New York Times the girls were so close that Annabell's twin sister, who was home-schooled, was often jealous of their relationship.

"We are a very tight family," Flores told the outlet. "It's just devastating."

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Texas shooter texted German teenager that he planned to 'shoot up a elementary school,' said he ordered ammunition online

Robb Elementary School in Uvalde, TX
Law enforcement officers speak together outside of Robb Elementary School following the mass shooting at Robb Elementary School on May 24, 2022 in Uvalde, Texas. According to reports, 19 students and 2 adults were killed, with the gunman fatally shot by law enforcement.Brandon Bell/Getty Images

The 18-year-old who killed at least 21 people at a Texas elementary school told a teenage girl he befriended online that he shot his grandmother and ordered ammunition from the internet, according to text messages obtained by The New York Times.

"I just shot my grandma in her head," the shooter said in a text message to the friend, a 15-year-old in German that he met on the social networking app Yubo, the Times reported. "Ima (sic) go shoot up a elementary school rn," he added.

The text messages were shared with law enforcement after the mass shooting. According to The Times, the recipient, identified only by her nickname "Cece," said she understood the gravity of the messages after seeing the shooting on the news, at which point she asked a friend to contact US authorities.

The gunman also told her that he had purchased an AR-15 on his birthday, May 16, and had more recently bought ammunition that would expand on impact, purchased online and delivered the night before the shooting spree.

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The Robb Elementary School shooting is the US's 27th school shooting so far this year

People react outside the Ssgt Willie de Leon Civic Center, where students had been transported from Robb Elementary School after a shooting, in Uvalde, Texas, U.S. May 24, 2022. REUTERS/Marco Bello
People sit outside a civic centre near Uvalde, Texas, on May 24, 2022.REUTERS/Marco Bello

A database from Education Week has recorded 27 school shootings resulting in injury or death so far in 2022.

According to the database, 27 people have died in 2022 as a result of school shootings, with 24 deaths being students or children and three being school employees or adults.

The database shows that 119 school shootings have occurred in the US since 2018, killing 88 people and injuring at least 213.


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The Uvalde coroner is releasing the 21 victims' bodies to their families

Members of the community gather at the City of Uvalde Town Square for a prayer vigil in the wake of a mass shooting at Robb Elementary School on May 24, 2022 in Uvalde, Texas.
Members of the community gather at the City of Uvalde Town Square for a prayer vigil in the wake of a mass shooting at Robb Elementary School on May 24, 2022 in Uvalde, Texas.Getty Images

The 21 victims from the Texas school shooting are beginning to be released to their families, according to reports from Uvalde.

CBS News reporter Lilia Luciano confirmed that "all of the victims have been identified and as soon as the San Antonio Medical Examiner finishes autopsies, the Uvalde coroner will release the victims' bodies to their families."

Funeral homes will collect the bodies, which will continue to be released Wednesday evening and Thursday, according to Newsy's Sasha Ingber.

NRA blames the Texas school shooting on a 'lone, deranged criminal' and says its annual meeting will carry on as planned

A convention goer passes the NRA desk at the 2015 NRA Annual Convention.
A convention goer passes the NRA desk at the 2015 NRA Annual Convention.KAREN BLEIER/AFP via Getty Images

The National Rifle Association blamed a "lone, deranged criminal" for Tuesday's mass shooting at a Texas elementary school that left 19 children and two adults dead — and said its annual meeting will go on as planned.

In a Wednesday statement, the NRA said it would still hold its annual meeting beginning Friday in Houston.

Houston is just under 300 miles from Robb Elementary School in Uvalde, where Tuesday's massacre — which claimed the lives of 19 children and 2 adults — took place.

"As we gather in Houston, we will reflect on these events, pray for the victims, recognize our patriotic members, and pledge to redouble our commitment to making our schools secure," the NRA said. Read Full Story

A Texas sheriff's deputy's daughter was killed in the Uvalde school shooting that left 19 children dead, Abbott says

Law enforcement officers gather outside of Robb Elementary School following the mass shooting there on May 25, 2022 in Uvalde, Texas.
Law enforcement officers gather outside of Robb Elementary School following the mass shooting there on May 25, 2022 in Uvalde, Texas.Photo by Brandon Bell/Getty Images

the Uvalde elementary school shooting on Tuesday, Texas Gov. Greg Abbott said.

"One deputy sheriff lost a daughter in that school," Abbott said at a press conference at Uvalde High School on Wednesday, a day after an 18-year-old gunman opened fire at Robb Elementary School, killing 19 children and two adults.

"The entire community is in utter shock about this," Abbott said. "Some physical wounds that were sustained by the officers — they're going to heal in the coming days. The mental and emotional wounds are far harder to see and last far longer."


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Texas school gunman wrote in Facebook messages that he would shoot his grandmother and attack an elementary school moments before the shooting

People gather at Robb Elementary School, the scene of a mass shooting in Uvalde, Texas, U.S. May 25, 2022.
People gather at Robb Elementary School, the scene of a mass shooting in Uvalde, Texas, U.S. May 25, 2022.Nuri Vallbona/Reuters

The Texas school gunman wrote on Facebook that he would shoot his grandmother and attack an elementary school just moments before the attack that left 19 children and 2 adults dead.

Texas Gov. Greg Abbott said at a press conference on Wednesday that the 18-year-old gunman posted on Facebook about 30 minutes before he reached Robb Elementary School in Uvalde, Texas.

In his first message, he said he was going to shoot his grandmother. That post was followed by a second, saying he had shot his grandmother.

The third post — which was posted less than 15 minutes before arriving at the school — said "I'm going to shoot an elementary school," according to Abbott.

Andy Stone, a communications director at Facebook's parent company Meta, later clarified that the messages sent by the shooter were private and were discovered only after the "tragedy" occurred. Stone said Meta was cooperating with law enforcement as they investigate the shooting.

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Texas Gov. Greg Abbott blames mass shootings on mental health concerns, despite noting that there's no evidence yet that the Texas school gunman had mental health issues

Texas officials sit on a stage giving a press conference.
Texas Gov. Greg Abbott speaks during a press conference at Uvalde High School on May 25, 2022 in Uvalde, Texas.Photo by Jordan Vonderhaar/Getty Images

Texas Gov. Greg Abbott attributed the rise in mass shootings to mental health challenges, despite previously noting that the suspected shooter in a Tuesday elementary school attack that left 21 people dead did not have a known history of mental health issues.

"The gunman was 18 years old and reportedly a high school dropout. Reportedly, there has been no criminal history identified yet," Abbott said. "He may have had a juvenile record, but that is yet to be determined."

He added: "There is no known mental health history of the gunman."

But minutes later, when asked a question about the role that Texas gun laws might have played in the gunman's ability to purchase the weapons he used in the massacre, Abbott pivoted the conversation away from guns and back to mental health.

"What I do know, in talking to the leaders here, as well as leaders around the state, one thing that has substantially changed is the status of mental health in our communities," he said. "We as a state, we as as a society, need to do a better job with mental health."

"Anybody who shoots somebody else has a mental health challenge, period," Abbott added.

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Beto O'Rourke interrupts Texas Gov. Abbott's elementary school shooting press conference and accuses him of 'doing nothing'

Beto interrupts press conference in Uvalde
Texas Democratic gubernatorial candidate Beto O'Rourke disrupts a press conference held by Governor Greg Abbott the day after a gunman killed 19 children and two teachers at Robb Elementary school in Uvalde, Texas.Veronica G. Cardenas

Former Texas congressman and Democratic gubernatorial candidate Beto O'Rourke confronted Texas Gov. Greg Abbott during a press conference over Tuesday's mass shooting at a Uvalde elementary school, accusing him of "doing nothing" about gun violence.

As Abbott was wrapping up his statement, O'Rourke approached the stage and began speaking.

"You're doing nothing. You are offering us nothing. This is totally predictable," O'Rourke told the Republican governor during the Wednesday briefing at Uvalde High School.

As O'Rourke interrupted the press conference, one Texas official behind the governor shouted that O'Rourke was "out of line" and a "sick son of a bitch."

O'Rourke was ultimately escorted out by security. After leaving the building, O'Rourke addressed a crowd of reporters and continued to rail against Abbott.

"He's refused to champion 'red flag laws,'" O'Rourke said. "He's refused to support safe storage laws so young people cannot get their hands on their parent's guns. He's refused to support a ban on AR-15s and AK-47s."

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Gov. Abbott gives press conference on Robb Elementary school shooting, saying the victims' families need 'love' and 'uplifting'

Greg Abbott
Greg Abbott promises to build a wall along the southern border.Camila DeChalus

Texas Gov. Greg Abbott gave a press conference Tuesday afternoon to offer updates on the Robb Elementary School shooting in Ulvade.

"The reality is, as horrible as it is what happened, it could have been worse. The reason it was not worse is because law enforcement officials did what they do. They showed amazing courage, by running toward gunfire for the singular purpose of trying to save lives and it is a fact that because of their quick response getting on the scene, being able to respond to the gunman and eliminate the gunman they were able to save lives, unfortunately not enough," the governor said Tuesday.

"What Uvalde shooting victims' families need most now is 'love' and 'uplifting,'" he added.

Abbott confirmed that in addition to the 21 people killed — 19 children and two teachers — 17 have been injured though they are not facing life-threatening injuries.

Abbott said the gunman posted on Facebook 30 minutes before arriving at Robb Elementary.

"I'm going to shoot my grandmother," he wrote. Then, "I shot my grandmother," followed by, "I'm going to shoot an elementary school."

The gunman shot his grandmother in the face. She then called 911. After this incident, the gunman went to the school.

Abbott confirmed that a Border Control officer killed the gunman at the scene.

A timeline of how the Robb Elementary School shooting in Texas unfolded

A family grieves outside of the SSGT Willie de Leon Civic Center following the mass shooting at Robb Elementary School on May 24, 2022 in Uvalde, Texas.
A family grieves outside of the SSGT Willie de Leon Civic Center following the mass shooting at Robb Elementary School on May 24, 2022 in Uvalde, Texas.Brandon Bell/Getty Images

The shooting at Robb Elementary School on Tuesday marked the deadliest school shooting since the Sandy Hook massacre 10 years ago. Many aspects of the day's events are still being confirmed.

Here is a timeline of what officials and news outlets have confirmed about the shooting. In some cases, the exact sequence of events is unknown.

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Top Democrat Dick Durbin says Senate won't discuss gun control measures until after holiday weekend

Senator Dick Durbin
Senator Dick Durbin.Anna Moneymaker/Getty Images

Top Democrat Dick Durbin said on Tuesday that the Senate won't discuss gun control measures until after the upcoming Memorial Day weekend.

"It's too late to prevent the last shooting. We've already failed those victims and families," the Illinois senator said. "We need to act to prevent the next shooting. We need to identify the risks and threats and finally do something."

Durbin also said that Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer began the Rule 14 process for a background check bill on Monday night, which would allow the Senate to put the bill directly on the Senate calendar.

"The House of Representatives already passed a bill on this. I think it's time for the Senate to vote on it," Durbin said.

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All of the children killed were in the same fourth grade class.

Law enforcement personnel stand outside Robb Elementary School
Law enforcement personnel stand outside Robb Elementary School following a shooting, Tuesday, May 24, 2022, in Uvalde, Texas.Dario Lopez-Mills/AP

All of the victims were inside the same classroom, where the gunman barricaded himself in, officials said.

"The shooter was able to make entry into a classroom, barricaded himself inside that classroom and again just began shooting numerous children and teachers that were in that classroom, having no regard for human life," Lt. Christopher Olivarez, a spokesperson for the Texas Department for Public Safety said during an interview on the "Today" show.

Olivarez said officers began breaking windows and helping kids across the school evacuate so there wouldn't be any more fatalities. He described the gunman as "just a complete evil person by not having any regard for children, anyone that was inside that classroom."

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The gunman purchased two guns right after he turned 18.

Robb Elementary School in Uvalde, TX
Law enforcement officers speak together outside of Robb Elementary School following the mass shooting at Robb Elementary School on May 24, 2022 in Uvalde, Texas. According to reports, 19 students and 2 adults were killed, with the gunman fatally shot by law enforcement.Brandon Bell/Getty Images

Authorities said the gunman, who turned 18 on May 16 purchased a firearm the following day, The Houston Chronicle reported.

On May 18, he purchased 375 rounds of ammunition and on May 20, he bought another rifle.

On Tuesday, at least 19 children and two adults were killed at Robb Elementary School. 

Texas allows for the purchase of a rifle for anyone over 18 years old, and the state has made it easier to buy guns in recent months.

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'AGAIN': The Dallas Morning News front page highlights the frequency of mass shootings.

The Dallas Morning News released a powerful front page the day after the Uvdale shooting.

"19 kids, 2 adults massacred at elementary campus," the page read.

The mass shooting is one of the deadliest on a school campus in years, following the 2018 Parkland shooting which killed 17 people, and the 2012 Sandy Hook shooting which killed 27 people including 20 children.

Texas GOP officials respond to elementary school shooting by calling for more guns and security in schools.

Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton
Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton.Photo by Brandon Bell/Getty Images

Two top Republican officials in Texas responded to the mass shooting in Uvalde by declaring their opposition to tightening gun laws and calling for more security, including guns, in schools.

In a Tuesday interview with the conservative Newsmax TV channel, Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton said the right response was to ensure more people had access to firearms to stop shootings.

"People who are shooting people, who are killing kids, they're not following murder laws so they're not going to follow gun laws," he said.

Sen. Ted Cruz of Texas also rejected calls for tighter gun laws, suggesting that more armed police should be stationed at schools instead.

"We know from past experience that the most effective tool for keeping kids safe is armed law enforcement on the campus," Cruz told MSNBC.

And in a Tuesday interview on Fox News' "Tucker Carlson Tonight," Texas Lt. Gov. Dan Patrick said that the right response was to "harden the targets," or improve school security.


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These are the victims of the shooting who have been identified so far.

Uziyah Garcia smiles in a red t-shirt inside a home
This March 2022 photo provided by Manny Renfro shows his grandson, Uziyah Garcia, while on spring break in San Angelo, Texas. Garcia was killed in the shooting, his family said.Manny Renfro via AP

At least 19 children and two adults were killed in the mass shooting at Robb Elementary School in Uvalde, Texas, on Tuesday.

Among the victims were three children under 10 years old and two fourth-grade teachers. Here's what we know so far.


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Texas Republicans made it easier to buy and carry guns months before 19 kids were shot and killed at the elementary school.

People react outside the Ssgt Willie de Leon Civic Center, where students had been transported from Robb Elementary School after a shooting, in Uvalde, Texas, U.S. May 24, 2022. REUTERS/Marco Bello
People sit outside a civic centre near Uvalde, Texas, on May 24, 2022.REUTERS/Marco Bello

Tuesday's school shooting at Robb Elementary School came months after Republicans in Texas made it easier to buy and carry guns in the state.

The shooter legally purchased one of the rifles on May 17, the day after his 18th birthday, the Chronicle reported, citing authorities and Texas Sen. John Whitmire.

Texas has made it easier to purchase guns in recent months — despite the state's playing host to a series of mass shootings in recent memory, including the killing of a combined 30 people in El Paso and Odessa in 2019.

new state law that came into force on September 1 allowed anyone aged over 21 to carry a handgun in most places without a permit or training. The bill was put forward by Texas Republicans.

Before the change, Texans had to pass a background check, take a safety course, and take a competency test to get a license.


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10-year-old victim of the shooting was killed as she was calling 911, grandmother says.

People leave the Civic Center after a mass shooting at Robb Elementary School in Uvalde, Texas, U.S., May 24, 2022.
People leave the Civic Center after a mass shooting at Robb Elementary School in Uvalde, Texas, U.S., May 24, 2022.REUTERS/Nuri Vallbona

Ten-year-old Amerie Jo Garza was killed in the shooting, her family said.

Her grandmother, Berlinda Irene Arreola told The Daily Beast that her granddaughter was in the the fourth grade and that she was shot while she tried to call 911.

"So the gunman went in and he told the children, 'You're going to die,'" Arreola told The Daily Beast.

"And she had her phone and she called 911. And instead of grabbing it and breaking it or taking it from her, he shot her."

Arreola said she was told by authorities that her granddaughter died immediately.


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Death toll rises: At least 19 children and two adults were killed in the shooting, CNN reports.

A school employee talks through the window of a school bus at Robb Elementary School
A school employee talks through the window of a school bus to one of the parents near the scene of a suspected shooting near Robb Elementary School in Uvalde, Texas, U.S. May 24, 2022.Marco Bello/Reuters

In recent hours the death toll from the Uvalde Elementary School shooting has increased to 19 children and two adults, according to reports from CNN. Most victims have yet to be identified.

This is the deadliest elementary school shooting since the Sandy Hook Elementary School massacre in 2012, which took the lives of 20 children and six adults.

 

Records show 70% of school shootings since 1999 have been carried out by people under 18: report

People grieve outside the SSGT Willie de Leon Civic Center, where the community has gathered in the wake of a mass shooting at Robb Elementary School on May 24, 2022 in Uvalde, Texas. According to reports, 19 students and 2 adults were killed before the gunman was fatally shot by law enforcement.
Around 311,000 children in 331 schools have been exposed to gun violence in their schools since 1999, The Post reported.ordan Vonderhaar/Getty Images

At least 70% of all school shootings since 1999 have been carried out by people under the age of 18, when counting cases where the age of the shooter was recorded, The Washington Post reported.

The youngest of these was a six-year-old male first grader, who shot his classmate in 2000 with a .32-caliber handgun after saying he didn't like her.

Based on incidents during that period, the median age of school shooters on K-12 campuses is 16, excluding 86 cases where the shooter's age is unknown, per The Post.


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The families of those involved in the Texas school shooting were asked to give DNA swabs to help identify victims: report

Families gather and hug outside the Willie de Leon Civic Center where grief counseling will be offered in Uvalde, Texas, on May 24, 2022. - A teenage gunman killed 18 young children in a shooting at an elementary school in Texas on Tuesday, in the deadliest US school shooting in years. The attack in Uvalde, Texas -- a small community about an hour from the Mexican border -- is the latest in a spree of deadly shootings in America, where horror at the cycle of gun violence has failed to spur action to end it.
One of the deadliest attacks happened on Tuesday, when at least 18 children and one teacher were killed in an elementary shooting in Uvalde, Texas.ALLISON DINNER/AFP via Getty Images

Families of those involved in the elementary school shooting in Uvalde, Texas, were asked to give DNA samples to help investigators identify victims.

According to Anayeli Ruiz, a journalist with KHOU 11 News Houston, parents told her that they were "going one by one" to get swabbed by investigators.

According to Interpol, DNA swabs are commonly used to verify the identities of disaster victims, particularly in cases where bodies are not immediately identifiable.


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'The agonized screams of family members are audible from the parking lot' as parents learn of deaths, reporter says

A family grieves outside of the SSGT Willie de Leon Civic Center following the mass shooting at Robb Elementary School on May 24, 2022 in Uvalde, Texas.
A family grieves outside of the SSGT Willie de Leon Civic Center following the mass shooting at Robb Elementary School on Tuesday.Brandon Bell/Getty Images

"The agonized screams of family members are audible from the parking lot."

That's how a reporter covering the Robb Elementary School shooting in Uvalde, Texas, described the scene on Tuesday night.

In a series of tweets, Niki Griswold, a journalist with Austin-American Statesman, described the anguish at the Uvalde Civic Center, which is serving as a reunification site for families impacted by the shooting.


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Columbine survivor speaks out on Robb Elementary School shooting: 'You just kind of keep reliving the unthinkable'

Tyler Vielie walks past crosses with the names of the victims of the Columbine High School shooting next to the Columbine Memorial on April 20, 2021 in Littleton, Colorado. Twelve students and a teacher were killed in the mass shooting
Tyler Vielie walks past crosses with the names of the victims of the Columbine High School shooting next to the Columbine Memorial in Littleton, Colorado.Michael Ciaglo/Getty Images

On Tuesday, 21 people – 19 of whom were children – were killed at Robb Elementary School in Uvalde, Texas. The shooting is the deadliest school shooting since Sandy Hook, Connecticut, in which 27 were killed in 2012.

Survivors like Zach Cartaya, who lived through the 1999 Columbine High school shooting in Littleton, Colorado, are speaking out about tragic school shootings that are becoming more commonplace in the United States.

As a survivor and co-founder of The Rebels Project, a non-profit that provides survivors with mental health resources, Cartaya told Insider that survivors "just kind of keep reliving the unthinkable."


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Sen. Ted Cruz rejects calls for gun control and suggests more armed cops should be stationed at schools

Ted Cruz
Sen. Ted Cruz suggested on Tuesday that the solution to gun violence was not gun control, but more armed law enforcement officers at schools.Win McNamee/Getty Images

Sen. Ted Cruz on Tuesday proposed in the wake of the deadly mass shooting in Uvalde, Texas, that more armed officers be stationed at schools.

Speaking to the media, Cruz asserted he did not believe gun control was a solution to halting gun violence in the US.

"We know from past experience that the most effective tool for keeping kids safe is armed law enforcement on the campus," Cruz said in an interview on MSNBC.


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One place you won't find guns in Texas? At the upcoming NRA leadership conference, which will be held this Friday in Houston.

An image of President Donald Trump standing in front of an NRA sign.
Then-President Donald Trump addresses the National Rifle Association (NRA) Leadership Forum in Atlanta, Georgia, on April 28, 2017.Jim Watson/AFP via Getty Images

One place you won't be able to find firearms in Texas after the Robb Elementary School massacre is the National Rifle Association's upcoming forum in Houston on May 27.

That's because the event will be attended by former President Donald Trump and Secret Service protocol won't permit "firearms, firearm accessories" or knives inside the event hall.

The leadership forum is described as "one of the most politically significant and popular events in the country, featuring our nation's top Second Amendment leaders in government, the media, and the entertainment industry."

 Texas Gov. Greg Abbott, Texas Sen. Ted Cruz, Texas Rep. Dan Crenshaw, and South Dakota Gov. Kristi Noem are all expected to attend, among others.


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There have been at least 554 school shooting victims in the US since the Columbine High School massacre: report

Families gather and hug outside the Willie de Leon Civic Center where grief counseling will be offered in Uvalde, Texas, on May 24, 2022. - A teenage gunman killed 18 young children in a shooting at an elementary school in Texas on Tuesday, in the deadliest US school shooting in years. The attack in Uvalde, Texas -- a small community about an hour from the Mexican border -- is the latest in a spree of deadly shootings in America, where horror at the cycle of gun violence has failed to spur action to end it.
One of the deadliest attacks happened on Tuesday, when at least 18 children and one teacher were killed in an elementary shooting in Uvalde, Texas.ALLISON DINNER/AFP via Getty Images

At least 554 children, educators, and school staff have been killed or injured in US school shootings since the 1999 Columbine High massacre, The Washington Post reported.

According to The Post, the shootings left 185 people dead and another 369 injured.

One of the deadliest attacks happened on Tuesday — an elementary shooting in Uvalde, Texas. At least 19 children and two adults had died from the assault, as of Tuesday night.


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Marjorie Taylor Greene takes pro-gun stance following Texas school shooting: 'We don't need more gun control.'

Marjorie Taylor Greene
Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene won her primary race in Georgia on Tuesday.Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty Images

GOP lawmaker Marjorie Taylor Greene made her anti-gun control stance clear in a tweet following a horrific mass shooting at an elementary school in Texas on Tuesday.

In a tweet following the incident, Greene speculated without basis that "sometimes meds can be the problem."

"Our nation needs to take a serious look at the state of mental health today," Greene tweeted.

"We don't need more gun control," she wrote. "We need to return to God."


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President Joe Biden empathized with parents over the pain and grief of losing a child in remarks following the deadly school shooting

Biden
Kevin Lamarque/Reuters

US President Joe Biden addressed the victims of the Texas elementary school mass shooting on Tuesday, appealing to parents who may have lost their children and calling for renewed restrictions on assault weapons.

"To lose a child is like having a piece of your soul ripped away. There's a hollowness in your chest, you feel like you're being sucked into it," Biden said. "And it's never quite the same."


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Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez calls out Sen. Ted Cruz for scheduled appearance at NRA event after Robb Elementary shooting

New York Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez
New York Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez.Brandon Bell/Getty Images

Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez criticized Texas Senator Ted Cruz for tweeting about the tragic shooting in Uvalde, Texas, after being slated to speak at a National Rifle Association meeting in Houston this weekend.

Cruz tweeted that he and his wife Heidi were "fervently lifting up in prayer the children and families in the horrific shooting in Uvalde."

Ocasio-Cortez replied: "Aren't you slated to headline a speaking gig for the NRA in three days - in Houston, no less? You can do more than pray. Faith without works is dead."

Other Republican lawmakers, including former President Donald Trump and Texas Governor Greg Abbott, are also scheduled to address the NRA event.


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Warriors head coach Steve Kerr slammed senators for not passing gun laws after the Texas school shooting

Steve Kerr seethes while speaking to reporters about gun laws in 2022.
Steve Kerr grew emotional while discussing the school shooting in Uvalde,Texas.via Warriors

Golden State Warriors head coach Steve Kerr chastised US Senators in an emotional plea for gun law reform after a school shooting in Uvalde, Texas, left 21 people dead Tuesday.

Speaking to reporters before Game 4 between the Warriors and Dallas Mavericks, an emotional Kerr slammed the table while yelling, "When are we gonna do something?"

"I'm so tired of getting up here and offering condolences to the devastated families that are out there," Kerr said, as he rubbed his hands over his face.

"I'm tired of the moments of silence. Enough! There's 50 Senators right now who refuse to vote on H.R.8, which is a background-check rule that the House passed a couple years ago. It's been sitting there for two years. And there's a reason they won't vote on it: to hold onto power."


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The New York Times reports an updated death toll: 19 people killed, including 18 children

Law enforcement officers stand in a blocked-off road.
Law enforcement work the scene after a mass shooting at Robb Elementary School where 19 people, including 18 children, were killed on May 24, 2022 in Uvalde, Texas.Photo by Jordan Vonderhaar/Getty Images

The death toll in Tuesday's tragedy has been updated to 19 people, including 18 children and one teacher, according to The New York Times, which cited state police.

Texas Gov. Greg Abbott initially reported that 15 people were killed, including 14 children, but the new death toll includes an additional four students.

The Texas Department of Public Safety did not immediately respond to Insider's request for updated numbers.

 

A nearby Border Patrol agent rushed into the school solo, shooting and killing the suspect: ABC News

Emergency personnel gather near Robb Elementary School
Emergency personnel gather near Robb Elementary School following a shooting, Tuesday, May 24, 2022, in Uvalde, Texas.Dario Lopez-Mills/AP

A Border Patrol agent who was nearby when the shooting suspect targeted the school rushed into the school without backup, shooting and killing the suspect, according to ABC News.

According to the report, the agent went into the school on his own and ahead of a tactical police squad and shot the suspect who was barricaded, killing him. The agent was reportedly wounded but was able to walk out of the school.

School district superintendent says all school events are canceled

Law enforcement personnel stand next to an armored vehicle outside Robb Elementary School
Law enforcement personnel stand next to an armored vehicle outside Robb Elementary School following a shooting, Tuesday, May 24, 2022, in Uvalde, Texas.Dario Lopez-Mill/AP

During a press conference on Tuesday, Superintendent Dr. Hal Harrell said "the school year is done," and that all school activities were canceled.

"We know graduation is on people's minds – we'll come out with a statement about that later," Harell said at the press conference, adding that the district will provide grief counseling at 10 a.m. tomorrow at the Uvalde civic center.

"We're a small community and we'll need your prayers to get us through this," he said.

Politicians respond to mass shooting at Texas elementary school, Biden expected to speak Tuesday evening

biden
President Joe Biden speaks to reporters in the Oval Office of the White House on May 9, 2022.Drew Angerer/Getty Images

US President Joe Biden has been briefed on the shooting and is expected to address the nation Tuesday evening at 8:15 p.m. ET. He spoke to Texas Gov. Greg Abbott Tuesday afternoon to offer assistance.

In the hours since gunfire erupted in the small community of Uvalde, several other politicians have made statements, offering a mixture of thoughts, prayers, and fierce calls for gun control.

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Texas Gov. Greg Abbott, Donald Trump scheduled to address NRA conference 72 hours after elementary school shooting

Texas Gov. Greg Abbott.
Texas Gov. Greg Abbott speaking at the annual National Rifle Association (NRA) convention in May 2018.REUTERS/Lucas Jackson/File Photo

Just 72 hours after at least 14 children and a teacher were shot to death at an elementary school in Uvalde, Texas, a number of Republican lawmakers are set to address a National Rifle Association meeting in Houston, including former President Donald Trump and Texas Governor Greg Abbott.

The NRA has long opposed efforts to restrict access to guns. In 2011, it sued Texas in a failed effort to force the state to lower the legal age for possessing a handgun from 21 to 18.

The NRA meeting, hosted by the group's Institute for Legislative Action – its self-described "lobbying" arm – is scheduled to begin Friday. It is open only to NRA members and runs through the weekend.

Additional scheduled speakers include Texas Sens. Ted Cruz and John Cornyn, Texas Rep. Dan Crenshaw, and South Dakota Gov. Kristi Noem. No Democrats are scheduled to be addressing the meeting.

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The incident was the deadliest elementary school shooting since Sandy Hook

Sandy Hook school
AP Photo/Jessica Hill, File

The shooting at Robb Elementary School in Uvalde, Texas, has left at least 14 students and one teacher dead, making it the deadliest mass shooting at an elementary school since Sandy Hook.

The Sandy Hook Elementary School shooting left 27 people dead on December 14, 2012, in Newtown, Connecticut. Each of the 20 child victims was aged 6 and 7.

 

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Sen. Chris Murphy once again pleads with the Senate to act on gun violence following the elementary school shooting

Chris Murphy
Sen. Chris Murphy of Connecticut.Sarah Silbiger/Pool via AP

Democratic Sen. Chris Murphy on Tuesday pleaded with his Senate colleagues to do something about gun violence, growing emotional as he discussed the similarities between the deadly elementary school shooting in Texas and Sandy Hook.

"What are we doing? What are doing?," Murphy, who is from Connecticut, said during a speech on the Senate floor. "Just days after a shooter walked into a grocery store to gun down African-American patrons, we have another Sandy Hook on our hands."


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Robb Elementary School had two days left in the school year before the mass shooting

Law enforcement personnel stand outside Robb Elementary School following a shooting, Tuesday, May 24, 2022, in Uvalde, Texas.
Law enforcement personnel stand outside Robb Elementary School following a shooting, Tuesday, May 24, 2022, in Uvalde, Texas.AP Photo/Dario Lopez-Mills

According to the UCISD calendar, students were due to start their summer break on Thursday.

Robb Elementary School enrolls students from second through fourth grade.

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Here's what we know about the 18-year-old suspect

Police walk near Robb Elementary School following a shooting, Tuesday, May 24, 2022, in Uvalde, Texas.
Police walk near Robb Elementary School following a shooting, Tuesday, May 24, 2022, in Uvalde, Texas.AP Photo/Dario Lopez-Mills

At a Tuesday press conference, Texas Gov. Greg Abbott announced that the suspect is believed to be an 18-year-old. Here's what we know so far about the suspect.


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At least 14 students and one teacher dead after shooting at elementary school, Texas governor says

In this June 8, 2021, file photo, Texas Gov. Greg Abbott speaks at a news conference in Austin, Texas.
In this June 8, 2021, file photo, Texas Gov. Greg Abbott speaks at a news conference in Austin, Texas.AP Photo/Eric Gay, File

A shooting at a Texas elementary school has left at least 14 students and a teacher dead, Texas Gov. Greg Abbott announced Tuesday.

The shooting occurred around noon at Robb Elementary School in Uvalde, Texas, just over 80 miles outside of San Antonio.

Abbott said in a press conference that the suspect, believed to be an 18-year-old male, is dead.

"He shot and killed — horrifically, incomprehensibly — 14 students and killed a teacher," Abbott said.


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