Local social worker speaks out against spanking on International No Spank Day

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Local social worker speaks out against spanking on International No Spank Day

As part of International No Spank Day, a local clinical social worker is encouraging parents to not spank their children.

"It simply teaches them that the bigger person will be able to use violence or aggression towards the smaller person, said Michelle Welgarz, a social worker and a mother-of-two, who recognized the global event on April 30.

Weglarz says there are better ways in which people can discipline their children — like issuing time-outs and providing natural consequences.

"If you spill a glass of milk, you clean it up. If you leave your dirty shoes on the floor, you sweep it up," she said.

Weglarz says even though parents are better educated today, she wouldn't be surprised if more people were spanking their children.

"People are so busy that they don't have time to think and react in a way that is appropriate and helpful in the long term," Weglarz said.

According to Weglarz there could be lasting psychological effects on children who get spanked as a child. She says children should have respect for their parents and not be fearful.

Dell Price, a mother visiting Windsor from Detroit, says she spanked her children when they were growing up.

"Spanking worked. It taught some discipline, they knew not to do it again, and it wasn't like it was a beating," Price said.

Price says she doesn't spank her grandchildren, however — all she has to do is give them "the look."