Lukashenko signs law suspending Belarus’ role in European arms treaty

Alexander Lukashenko
Alexander Lukashenko

Belarus’ self-proclaimed President Alexander Lukashenko has signed a law suspending the Treaty on Conventional Armed Forces in Europe, the Russian state news agency Interfax reported on May 28.

The Treaty on Conventional Armed Forces in Europe was signed on Nov. 19, 1990.

In early April, Lukashenko agreed to submit a bill to the parliament to suspend the treaty. The document was later approved by the Belarusian parliament.

Read also: Putin and Lukashenko to discuss cooperation during meeting in Belarus

Treaty on Conventional Armed Forces in Europe

The Treaty on Conventional Armed Forces in Europe was signed on Nov. 19, 1990, in Paris by 16 NATO states and six Warsaw Pact states (Bulgaria, Hungary, Poland, Romania, the USSR, and Czechoslovakia) and entered into force on Nov. 9, 1992.

Read also: Putin to urge Lukashenko to join nuclear exercises during Belarus visit

The treaty provides for limitations on the total levels of conventional armaments and equipment in five main categories: tanks, armored combat vehicles, artillery, attack helicopters, and combat aircraft. It also includes mechanisms for verifying compliance, such as information exchange and inspections.

Read also: Latvia starts to fortify its border with Russia and Belarus

The Czech Republic suspended its obligations under the treaty with Belarus in August 2022, and Poland made a similar decision in March 2023.

Belarus adopted a law in October 2023 suspending the Treaty on Conventional Armed Forces in Europe with respect to Poland and the Czech Republic.

Russia officially withdrew from the Treaty on Conventional Armed Forces in Europe on Nov. 7. On the same day, NATO countries also suspended their participation in the treaty in response to Russia's move.

We’re bringing the voice of Ukraine to the world. Support us with a one-time donation, or become a Patron!

Read the original article on The New Voice of Ukraine