Majority supports alcohol restrictions in Baker Lake, but motion falls short of threshold

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A majority of voters in Baker Lake, the fourth largest community in Nunavut, supported liquor restrictions, but the majority was too small to move forward with the process to create them. (Jordan Konek/CBC - image credit)
A majority of voters in Baker Lake, the fourth largest community in Nunavut, supported liquor restrictions, but the majority was too small to move forward with the process to create them. (Jordan Konek/CBC - image credit)

Residents in Baker Lake, Nunavut, voted to move forward with introducing liquor restrictions in a plebiscite held Monday — but the idea did not gain enough support to meet a key threshold for imposing them.

Of those who voted, 182 people, or 54 per cent of the turnout, voted to move to an Alcohol Education Committee, which would decide who in the community may consume, possess or purchase liquor, according to a news release issued Tuesday.

However, the Liquor Act requires at least 60 per cent of voters to change the status of a community.

"At this time, there will be no changes to the liquor system in Baker Lake," said Minister of Finance George Hickes.

"I want to thank the residents for voting in the plebiscite."

The results mean there will continue to be no restriction on the consumption, possession, purchase, sale or transport of liquor in the community.

If the community wishes to revisit the matter in the future, residents can petition to request a new plebiscite.

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