Man's theory on life after death goes viral

Samuel Murray took to Facebook to pose his own theory on life after death. Photo from Getty Images.

A Facebook user with a theory on life after death appears to be onto something, after his late night musing went viral.

Samuel Murray posted a run-on sentence speculating what he thinks might happen when you die:

What if when we die the light at the end of the tunnel is the light to another hospital room, there we are born and the only reason you come out crying is because you remember everything from your past life and you’re crying at the fact that you died and lost everything, as you grow you start to forget your past life and focus on the life you have now, but patches of memory stay behind and that memory causes deja vu. Think ’bout that for a second.

It seems his hypothesis has made many people think, as it was shared more than 126,000 times and accumulated nearly 30,000 comments.

Some people felt relieved they weren’t the only ones to come up with such a seemingly ‘out there’ theory.

“That’s my belief too…surprised to see someone else think exactly the same,” wrote Sharla Kehoe.

Others shared equally ‘out there’ theories.

“(Explanation) for population increase: what appears to be instant transference from one body to another, is actually years. Seconds in this life are years in death, time differential,” wrote Jonathan Nay.

But some Facebook users tried to poke holes in Murray’s theory.

“Or, the light is just life itself and you don’t necessarily come back as a human,” wrote Boogie Mobbin.

“Think about how many extinct species there are. Where did their souls go?”

Whatever your thoughts are on Murray’s theory, one thing is for sure: it makes you think.

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