Manure manoeuvre: Lingering Stratford sewage sludge bound for farmers' fields

·2 min read
Some liquid and sludge remains at the bottom of the lagoon in Stratford. (Tony Davis/CBC - image credit)
Some liquid and sludge remains at the bottom of the lagoon in Stratford. (Tony Davis/CBC - image credit)

There is a small stench lingering around the former sewage lagoon in Stratford, P.E.I.

Sewage from the town is now being pumped along the Hillsborough Bridge to be treated in Charlottetown — but some liquid and sludge remains at the bottom of the lagoon.

However, there is a plan to dispose of that leftover human waste.

"It will be fanned out to farmers' fields," said Gary Clow, deputy mayor of Stratford.

The wastewater lingering at the bottom of the lagoon will be used as fertilizer by farmers in the area.

"We do have farmers in the area that are interested in it, and possibly we will be using it for ourselves, mixed with the soil that will be going into the waterfront."

The town plans to establish a green space where the lagoon is now.

The town also had 15 Blue Frog circulation units used in the lagoon. Almost all of them have been bought by farmers, says Gary Clow, deputy mayor of Stratford.
The town also had 15 Blue Frog circulation units used in the lagoon. Almost all of them have been bought by farmers, says Gary Clow, deputy mayor of Stratford.(Tony Davis/CBC)

The town hopes to remove the sludge within the next month and start filling in the lagoon with soil, Clow said.

Dried waste from the lagoon has been kept in large bags near the site. It has taken on the consistency of coffee grounds, Clow said, and the town hopes to mix it with soil to create fertilizer.

Farmers aren't just taking the sludge away. The town also had 15 Blue Frog circulation units in the lagoon — Clow said almost all of them have been bought by farmers.

Waterfront green space

Plans are still in development for the green space that will replace the lagoon.

An online survey for residents resulted in lots of suggestions for the space for the town to consider.

"We will be putting in, possibly boardwalks and benches," he said. "There could be a gazebo there to put on a small little concert at night — nothing confirmed yet."

Clow hopes the waterfront park can be established within the $1 million budget the town has allocated.

However, it could take a while. First, a building for workers and a building with a pump station inside to keep the sewage headed for Charlottetown has to be established on the site, Clow said.

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