How many homers could Kris Bryant reach after becoming fastest Cubs player to 100?

The Chicago Cubs might not win the World Series as often as the New York Yankees or St. Louis Cardinals, but they still have a history that rivals any other in Major League Baseball. That’s what makes the milestone Kris Bryant reached during Wednesday’s game mighty impressive.

[Yahoo Fantasy Football leagues are open: Sign up now for free]

Three years to the day that Bryant hit his first MLB home run at Miller Park in Milwaukee, the Cubs third baseman slugged No. 100 in his career in Chicago’s 13-4 win against the Marlins at Wrigley Field. In doing so, Bryant became the fastest Cubs player ever to reach 100 homers in terms of games played. Bryant reached 100 homers in 487 games. That bested Cubs Hall of Famers Ernie Banks (500) and Billy WIlliams (611).

The feat cements Bryant as one of the biggest power threats in MLB today, alongside other stars like Giancarlo Stanton, Bryce Harper and Mike Trout. It also begs this question: Just how many home runs could Kris Bryant potentially hit before his career is over?

One of the best barometers given Bryant’s age and production might actually be Ernie Banks. The man known as “Mr. Cub” hit 512 career home runs during his legendary career, with each and every one coming in a Cubs uniform. To this point, 500-515 seems like a reasonable bar for Bryant, but perhaps we can find a path to a higher number.

Banks got a slight headstart on Bryant, debuting as a 22-year-old in 1953. By the end of his age 23 season he’d hit 21 total homers in 164 games. As for Bryant, he debuted as a 23-year-old in 2015, and would go on to win National League Rookie of the Year after hitting .275/.369/.488 with 26 homers and 99 RBIs in 151 games.

Things get a little more interesting though following the age 24 season for each player. At that point, both had hit 65 career homers. Following their age 25 season, Bryant was at 94 home runs while Banks was at 93.

It’s obviously a different game now than it was 65 years ago. Strikeouts were not as prevalent in those days. Banks, for example, only reached 100 strikeouts one time during his career. Bryant led MLB with 199 in 2015, and has added another 282 since. There were also no such things as launch angle readings to clue players in on how to adjust their swings for increased power.

When you factor in the changes in philosophy and statistical analysis, chances are they end up offsetting each other and again make Banks’ pace one that could easily apply to Bryant’s career arc. The next big question(s) then might revolve around Bryant’s durability and longevity. Banks played in 2,528 games over 19 seasons, and hit 93 home runs after the age of 35.

Kris Bryant is the fastest Chicago Cubs player ever to hit 100 home runs. How many more will follow? (AP)

To this point, Bryant has been durable. He’s played in at least 151 games in each of his first three seasons. He’s a bigger man than Banks at 6-foot-5, 230 pounds. But he’s also arguably a more versatile athlete. When it comes time for Bryant to change positions like Banks did late in his career, he should be able to handle it. All of those things play in Bryant’s favor, and there’s no reason to believe his power will decrease over time.

With that said, is it possible Bryant hangs around and challenges for 550 or even 600 home runs?

Yes, it’s possible. However, suggesting Bryant or anyone is a lock for 400 homers, let alone 500 or 600 or anything beyond is obviously a stretch. A lot would have to go right for that to happen, and baseball’s not exactly a game that lends itself to things going right or as expected. The not knowing though is what makes looking ahead all the more fun and interesting.

What we do know is that at age 26, Bryant already has several remarkable achievements on his résumé. We noted his Rookie of the Year award in 2015. He followed that up with an MVP season in 2016. More importantly, he was part of the franchise’s first World Series victory in 108 years. It’s fun to talk about home runs and Hall of Fame chances, but Bryant has already cemented a notable legacy in both Cubs and MLB history.

  • What you need to know about legally ordering marijuana online
    News
    CBC

    What you need to know about legally ordering marijuana online

    As of Oct. 17, each person of legal age in their province can legally purchase and possess 30 grams of marijuana. From the RCMP: Canada Post has standard operating procedures in place related to the inspection of mail while in transit. From Canada Post: Canada Post has been delivering medical cannabis safely since 2013.

  • Turkish official: Police found evidence of Khashoggi slaying
    News
    The Canadian Press

    Turkish official: Police found evidence of Khashoggi slaying

    Police searching the Saudi Consulate found evidence that Saudi writer Jamal Khashoggi was killed there, a high-level Turkish official said Tuesday, and authorities appeared ready to also search the nearby residence of the consul general after the diplomat left the country. The comment by the Turkish official to The Associated Press intensified pressure on Saudi Arabia to explain what happened to Khashoggi, who vanished Oct. 2 while visiting the consulate to pick up paperwork he needed to get married. The crown prince "told me that he has already started, and will rapidly expand, a full and complete investigation into this matter.

  • Toronto police welcome to apply to march in Pride Parade again, organizers say
    News
    The Canadian Press

    Toronto police welcome to apply to march in Pride Parade again, organizers say

    Toronto's Pride Parade has lifted a ban on uniformed police officers participating in the colourful annual event, saying the force was welcome to apply to be a part of next summer's festivities. The relationship between Pride Toronto and city police has been tense for the past two years — uniformed officers were banned from the parade in 2017 over concerns of racial profiling, and again this year over criticism the force had not taken the disappearances of several men missing from the city's gay village seriously. Pride Toronto said Tuesday the two sides have made progress on conversations related to "policing and institutional power" and said that if police apply to march in the 2019 parade, their request will be granted providing they meet the event's rules.

  • Nunavut officials say cannabis legalization is start of longer conversation
    News
    CBC

    Nunavut officials say cannabis legalization is start of longer conversation

    Wednesday marks the start of legal cannabis in Canada and a larger conversation about its pros and cons, according to several Nunavut officials who've been preparing for Oct. 17. Iqaluit's city bylaws prohibit smoking in any place where the smoke could enter another person's residence or a public place. "Hopefully when the time comes for some revenue sharing, [the government of Nunavut will be] willing to help acknowledge that we have costs, and therefore share some of the revenue," Stevenson said.

  • Raptors banking on championship pedigree of Leonard, Green
    News
    CBC

    Raptors banking on championship pedigree of Leonard, Green

    It would've been easy for the Toronto Raptors to stick with what they had. First to go was Dwane Casey, only the winningest head coach in Raptors history. Assistant coach Nick Nurse was promoted to take his place.

  • Uber IPO proposals value company at $120 billion: WSJ
    News
    Reuters

    Uber IPO proposals value company at $120 billion: WSJ

    Ride-hailing company Uber Technologies Inc [UBER.UL] could be valued at $120 billion, when it finally goes public next year according to proposals made by U.S. banks bidding to run the offering, the Wall Street Journal reported on Tuesday. The proposed valuation of the company is about $50 billion more than the company's most recent valuation, setting the stage for what would be one of the biggest listings ever. Reuters reported in late September that Goldman Sachs and Morgan Stanley were in pole position to secure top roles in Uber IPO.

  • Building a lifelong love of opera in toddlers, one hop at a time
    News
    Reuters

    Building a lifelong love of opera in toddlers, one hop at a time

    Welcome to London's Royal Opera House, where Opera Dots, a workshop for toddlers, aims to build a future fan base, one hop at a time. Beneath an elegant iron-and-glass ceiling, a group of young guests giggle on a multi-colored play mat as they mimic a costumed performer singing and dancing her way through 'Hansel and Gretel'. According to its annual reports, attendance at the Royal Opera House has fallen by 137,000 since 2013.

  • Kativik school board in northern Quebec calls emergency meeting in wake of youth suicides
    News
    CBC

    Kativik school board in northern Quebec calls emergency meeting in wake of youth suicides

    Kativik Ilisarniliriniq, the school board serving Quebec's Inuit territory of Nunavik, has called an emergency meeting at the end of this month to respond to a spate of youth suicides over the past four weeks. One of the victims was still in elementary school. "We feel the situation requires urgent collective action at the regional level," said the head of Kativik, Robert Watt, in a letter addressed to Inuit leaders, public service workers and elected government officials.

  • First legal weed sold in Canada at Newfoundland shops
    News
    CBC

    First legal weed sold in Canada at Newfoundland shops

    The first legal recreational cannabis has officially been sold in Canada. In Newfoundland and parts of Labrador, which has a separate timezone from the rest of Canada, midnight comes earlier, and people were ready and waiting for marijuana to be sold to them over the counter. The first sales went to Ian Power and Nikki Rose, who lined up outside awaiting the opening of the Tweed retail location on Water Street in downtown St. John's.

  • Chinese electric car makers, nurtured by state, now look for way out of glut
    News
    Reuters

    Chinese electric car makers, nurtured by state, now look for way out of glut

    The company wants to find a niche in a crowded sector that already includes renewable equipment manufacturers, battery makers and property developers like the Evergrande Group, as well as established auto giants. "This (large number of firms) is inevitable, because whenever there is an emerging technology or emerging industry, there must be a hundred schools of thought and a hundred flowers blooming," said Zhou Xuan, Automagic's general manager, referring to Chinese leader Mao Zedong's ill-fated 1956 "Hundred Flowers" campaign aimed at encouraging new ideas. China is using preferential policies and brute manufacturing power to position itself at the forefront of global efforts to electrify transportation.

  • Couple bikes from Ontario to Alberta for fresh start, fresh bud
    News
    CBC

    Couple bikes from Ontario to Alberta for fresh start, fresh bud

    From rolling hills in Ontario to golden leaves on the Prairies, Josh Millard and Chloe Chaput saw a lot of Canada over the past two months as they biked from Toronto to Edmonton. The couple decided to move to Alberta for front-row seats to a changing day in Canadian history — on the eve of legalization, they plan to be first in line to buy cannabis at an Edmonton pot shop. The 25-year-olds were lured to Alberta in part by the province's relatively lax cannabis rules.

  • China says interning Muslims brings them into 'modern' world
    News
    The Canadian Press

    China says interning Muslims brings them into 'modern' world

    China on Tuesday characterized its mass internment of Muslims as a push to bring into the "modern, civilized" world a destitute people who are easily led astray — a depiction that analysts said bore troubling colonial overtones. The report is the ruling Communist Party's latest effort to defend its extrajudicial detention of Central Asian Muslim minorities against mounting criticism. China's resistance to Western pressure over the camps highlights its growing confidence under President Xi Jinping, who has offered Beijing's authoritarian system as a model for other countries.

  • Brazil's Temer charged with corruption, money laundering
    News
    The Canadian Press

    Brazil's Temer charged with corruption, money laundering

    Brazil's federal police filed new charges against President Michel Temer on Tuesday, recommending he be put on trial for corruption, money laundering and criminal association for allegedly taking bribes to favour port management companies. The investigation report was filed to the country's top court and obtained by The Associated Press. The report signed by investigator Cleyber Malta Lopes also argues that Temer's assets should be frozen.

  • More than 200 Calgarians turn out for 1st public session on 2026 Olympic bid
    News
    CBC

    More than 200 Calgarians turn out for 1st public session on 2026 Olympic bid

    Calgary held the first of six public engagement sessions Tuesday to provide information and let people weigh in on whether or not the city should bid for the 2026 Winter Olympic Games. Barbara Hennessey was one of more than 200 people who attended the open house at the Dalhousie Community Association, hoping to gain some information to help her decide how to vote on Nov. 13. "It's a no, I don't feel Calgary is in a position to host them right now.

  • NASA astronaut describes close call following failed launch
    News
    The Canadian Press

    NASA astronaut describes close call following failed launch

    The NASA astronaut who survived last week's failed launch and emergency landing knew he needed to stay calm. Air Force Col. Nick Hague on Tuesday described the closest call of his career: His space capsule violently ripped from his damaged rocket shortly after liftoff, then with lights flashing and alarms sounding, plunged steeply back to Earth with punishing force. Hague said he and his commander, Russian Alexei Ovchinin, were flung from side to side and shoved back hard into their seats, as the drama unfolded 50 kilometres (31 miles) above Kazakhstan last Thursday.

  • Grow your own pot crop: cannabis experts explain process ahead of legalization
    Global News

    Grow your own pot crop: cannabis experts explain process ahead of legalization

    Canadians in all provinces except Manitoba and Quebec will be allowed up to four cannabis plants per household. Ryan Kessler reports.

  • Royal Canadian Legion in Regina looking to raise cash to stay afloat
    News
    CBC

    Royal Canadian Legion in Regina looking to raise cash to stay afloat

    The Royal Canadian Legion in Regina may no longer be around in two years time if it can't find a way to raise money. The organization has been dipping into savings to pay its operating costs, which are about $2,800 a month, but it only has enough cash to cover costs for the next 18 or so months. Hitchcock said people can also volunteer their time or donate cash to the legion if they want to help.

  • Photos: These are the first Canadians to buy legal weed
    Yahoo Canada News

    Photos: These are the first Canadians to buy legal weed

    As of 12:01 a.m., recreational cannabis became legal across Canada. Well before the hour struck, lineups were queueing up outside pot stores in the country’s biggest cities. Ian Power was the first person to purchase legal marijuana in Canadian history. He lined up at midnight in St. John’s during the opening of the Tweed retail location. That event was attended by Bruce Linton, CEO of Canopy Growth Corporation, which owns the Tweed brand. “I’m elated,” Power told CBC News. “I’m so excited, I can’t stop smiling. I’m not cold. It’s freezing cold out, but I’m not cold.” Power also told The Canadian Press he was not actually going to smoke the first bud he bought, and would keep it as a memento “forever.” On Wednesday morning, stores began opening in other provinces, and more Canadians made their first purchases. Among those waiting outside the store in Sydney River, N.S. was none other than Canadian fiddling legend Ashley MacIsaac. “I don’t need to be a criminal anymore, and that’s a great feeling,” MacIsaac told The Canadian Press. In 2001, he was arrested for possession in Saskatchewan. “And my new dealer is the prime minister!” But not every province and territory has brick-and-mortar locations available. Sales in Ontario will only be through the Ontario Cannabis Store’s website until April 2019 at the earliest. It was down early Wednesday morning, but was back up as of this writing. Alberta’s online pot store also received heavy traffic as soon as 12:01 a.m. hit. At 12:07 a.m. local time, the Alberta Liquor and Gaming Commission tweeted: “You like us! Our website is experiencing some heavy traffic. We are working hard to get it up and running.” Here’s a look at some of the first Canadians to get their hands on legal pot. With files from The Canadian Press.

  • Microsoft co-founder Paul Allen dies of cancer complications at 65
    News
    Reuters

    Microsoft co-founder Paul Allen dies of cancer complications at 65

    Allen left Microsoft in 1983, before the company became a corporate juggernaut, following a dispute with Gates, but his share of their original partnership allowed him to spend the rest of his life and billions of dollars on yachts, art, rock music, sports teams, brain research and real estate. Allen died from complications of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, a type of cancer, the Allen family said in a statement. In early October, Allen had revealed he was being treated for the non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, which he also was treated for in 2009.

  • Edmonton food bank sees demand rise dramatically
    News
    CBC

    Edmonton food bank sees demand rise dramatically

    The Edmonton Food Bank is seeing a dramatic increase in the number of people who need food hampers, says executive director Marjorie Bencz. Both groups need more help from the province to pay their rent and grocery bills, Bencz said.

  • Canadians prepare to usher in legal pot with parties, protests and puffs
    News
    The Canadian Press

    Canadians prepare to usher in legal pot with parties, protests and puffs

    Trevor Pott doesn't consider himself a seasoned cannabis user, or part of the vocal community that has embarked on the decades-long battle to legalize recreational use. "This is a thing that I personally believe is going to be transformative to our culture in a big way," says Pott, who spent the weekend tidying up the duplex he shares with his wife, dusting off their ceiling-mounted projector for a weed-friendly film screening. Newfoundlanders will be the first to purchase legal weed when its retailers open their doors at midnight, while Torontonians are being courted by New Year's Eve-style "bud drop" countdowns just before legalization.

  • Trash collection app crowdsources planet cleanup while collecting garbage data
    News
    CBC

    Trash collection app crowdsources planet cleanup while collecting garbage data

    With the simple act of taking a picture of a piece of trash and posting it to social media, Jeff Kirschner kicked off a global social movement to help clean the planet. Kirschner told the Calgary Eyeopener on Tuesday it all began while hiking through the woods with his kids when his daughter noticed someone had thrown a plastic cat litter tub into the river. Kirschner said he started posting photos to Instagram of trash he found in the wild.

  • Feds aiming to select preferred design for $60B warships by end of month
    News
    The Canadian Press

    Feds aiming to select preferred design for $60B warships by end of month

    Canada's most expensive military project is entering a critical new phase as the government is on the verge of picking its top design for the country's $60-billion fleet of new warships. Defence insiders say the government wants to select a design by the end of the month from among three options submitted by several of the largest defence and shipbuilding companies in the world. After that the government and Halifax-based Irving Shipbuilding, which will actually build the 15 new warships, will sit down with the selected bidder to hammer out the final cost and other details.

  • 10 cannabis-filled films to watch amid legalization
    News
    The Canadian Press

    10 cannabis-filled films to watch amid legalization

    Mary Jane and the movies have been a long-time pairing, from 1936's propaganda film "Reefer Madness" to contemporary onscreen stoners like Vancouver's Seth Rogen. "Reefer Madness": Worth watching just to see how far viewpoints on cannabis have changed since the '30s. Hijinks — and highs — ensue when they unwittingly smuggle a van constructed out of marijuana out of Mexico.

  • Home search giant Zillow adds Canadian listings to online marketplace
    News
    CBC

    Home search giant Zillow adds Canadian listings to online marketplace

    U.S. real estate website Zillow is expanding to offer listings for homes being sold in Canada. Seattle-based Zillow says it has agreements to receive more than 50,000 listings from Canadian brokerages and franchisors, which include Century 21 Canada, Right at Home Realty, Re/Max Ultimate Realty Inc., Exit Realty Corp International, Better Homes and Gardens Real Estate Signature Service, Core Assets Real Estate, and Greater Property Group. In addition, Realty Executives International, based in Scottsdale, Arizona, will send listings from its Canadian franchises to Zillow's mobile app and website.