Meghan Markle & Prince Harry Unveil the Name of Their New Foundation

Erica Gonzales
Photo credit: Pool - Getty Images

From Harper's BAZAAR

  • Meghan Markle and Prince Harry are launching their own foundation called Sussex Royal.
  • A month ago, news broke that the royal couple was breaking away from The Royal Foundation, the charitable vehicle they shared with Prince William and Kate Middleton.
  • The directors of Sussex Royal will reportedly be the Duke and Duchess of Sussex, PR director Sara Latham, and a former Royal Foundation staff member.

It seems like things are starting to come together for Prince Harry and Duchess Meghan's charity. Today, royal correspondent Emily Andrews exclusively shared that the couple's new foundation is called Sussex Royal The Foundation of the Duke and Duchess of Sussex, according to official documents. The directors of the company are Meghan and Harry, along with their PR manager Sara Latham, and Natalie Campbell, a former staffer at the Royal Foundation.

According to the certificate of incorporation obtained by Andrews, Sussex Royal was registered as a private company. The duke and duchess made a good choice with the name; it's also their Instagram handle, @sussexroyal. (Consistency is key!)

In June, it was announced that Harry and Meghan were parting ways from the Royal Foundation, the charity vehicle they previously shared with Prince William and Kate Middleton. Through the organization, which the Harry and William started in 2009, the two couples supported various causes from mental health issues, to conservation, and more.

William and Kate will continue to lead the Royal Foundation while Harry and Meghan move onto their separate endeavor; but that doesn't meant the two duos won't work together on projects in the future.


The Duke and Duchess of Sussex are "very excited" for this next chapter of their royal work, a Buckingham Palace source previously told BAZAAR.com. It's the couple's latest move in paving thier own path of royal life, from moving out of Kensington Palace to starting their own royal household.

"This is their chance to stamp their own personality on their charitable work," another insider told us. “Not only will their new foundation stand the test of time, but it will allow them to do some very ambitious things. Their charity will provide them with an opportunity to create something that will be their defining work—and it’s entirely theirs."

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    CBC

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  • 'Kids will fall through the cracks:' Advocates critical of child-welfare changes
    News
    The Canadian Press

    'Kids will fall through the cracks:' Advocates critical of child-welfare changes

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    The Canadian Press

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  • Marking 30 years since the Montreal Massacre
    CBC

    Marking 30 years since the Montreal Massacre

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    News
    CBC

    'Should I be taking these pictures?': Photojournalist recalls aftermath of Polytechnique shooting

    Christopher Morris, a Vancouver-based photographer, was 24 and relatively new to photojournalism when he arrived with his camera at the aftermath of Canada's deadliest mass shooting 30 years ago. On Dec. 6, 1989, a gunman walked into École Polytechnique de Montréal and killed 14 women — most of them young engineering students. Many more were injured during the anti-feminist rampage. Decades later, the memories are still hauntingly vivid for Morris. "There was a dead young woman sitting there in a chair, slumped over, and there was a police officer who was reaching up and pulling down a banner that said 'Joyeux Noel' [Merry Christmas]," he said. "I remember that scene so very vividly."Allen McInnis, another photographer on scene and a friend of Morris's, captured the moment in a photo that later became emblematic of the attack. Morris witnessed many such horrific scenes as he walked around the premises that night and, later, the emotional distress at the women's funerals. "A number of times, I asked myself 'Should I be here? Should I be taking these pictures? Is this the right thing to do?" he told Gloria Macarenko, the host of CBC's On The Coast."At the time, and now 30 years later, I still feel very strongly that taking those pictures was absolutely the right thing to do."The impact of photos Despite the emotional toll of taking and seeing the images, Morris says he believes they are necessary to capture the truth of the tragedy and prompt change. "You can draw a straight line between some of the pictures that were made that day that remind people of that tragedy and the fact that we have more restrictive gun laws here in Canada than elsewhere," he said. "People were shocked and appalled at what happened and the photos were part of that."One of the things Morris remembers most vividly from the scene was the reaction of families who lost their loved ones in the shooting. "It never ceases to amaze me how dignified people are during times of incredible stress," he said. "It's incredible how, when somebody has lost someone close, they still just say 'Yes, I want to tell their story. I don't want it to be meaningless.'"Thirty years later, that's what Morris hangs on to as Canada marks the anniversary of the massacre. "We need to try to make the world a better place and remembering things like this, when we were perhaps at our worst, helps us to be our best," he said.

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    News
    CBC

    LRT sewer snafu a real stinker, city says

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    News
    CBC

    Your gift guide to supporting Indigenous artists and businesses this holiday season

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    CBC

    Lawyer doesn't buy why London Diocese kept names of 4 priests secret

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  • Why Buddhist nuns try to avoid 'awkward' handshakes
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    CBC

    Why Buddhist nuns try to avoid 'awkward' handshakes

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    News
    The Canadian Press

    B.C. treaty commissioner expects UNDRIP bill to speed treaty talks, more deals

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"I also think it's complementary to the negotiation process because everything that's envisioned in the declaration is available in the treaty process, and UNDRIP and Bill 41 provide a framework to move forward in B.C. and that's whether in treaty talks or not," said Haldane.She said the B.C. legislation could provide the final impetus for reaching 37 treaty agreements with Indigenous nations who are in the final stage of talks with the provincial and federal governments.Haldane said Indigenous nations from Vancouver Island, the northwest coast and the Interior have reached stage five in the six-stage process."I would say the treaty negotiations process will be complementary to the legislation in B.C., and why I say that is because in our process our mandate has changed to include the implementation of UNDRIP," she said. "We are already seeing that happen at treaty tables where treaty negotiations are incorporating the declaration into negotiations and into their treaties."Haldane said she did not want to put time estimates on when the 37 nations will reach treaty settlements, but suggested once stage five is reached, final treaties are signed within two years.B.C. introduced modern-day treaty making in the early 1990s and seven Indigenous Nations have reached treaty agreements since then. The Nisga'a Nation in B.C.'s northwest negotiated a treaty outside of the process.Of B.C.'s more than 200 Indigenous nations, only about two dozen have signed treaties, with most dating back to the 1800s when the province was a British colony.Last month, B.C. became the first province in Canada to pass legislation to implement the UN declaration, mandating the government to bring its laws and policies into harmony with the declaration's principles.The federal government said in its throne speech this week that it will also introduce legislation to implement UNDRIP."I see the legislation finally putting a place marker in B.C. to level the playing field when it comes to human rights issues," Haldane said. "I don't think we're taking away from anyone. I think in B.C. we're looking at ensuring there's equity and equality between everyone."The declaration was adopted by the General Assembly of the UN in 2007 after 20 years of debate. Canada was originally one of four countries that voted against it. Among other things, the declaration says Indigenous Peoples have the right to self-determination, which means they can determine their political status and pursue economic, social and cultural development.The declaration requires governments to obtain "free and informed consent" from Indigenous groups before approving any project affecting their lands or resources, but B.C. Indigenous Relations and Reconciliation Minister Scott Fraser said neither the legislation nor the declaration includes wording that grants a veto over resource development projects.Haldane said the B.C. legislation brings all parties in treaty talks closer together."It's not about a veto," she said. "I believe it's about moving to consent. It's about having a seat at the table at the same time as everyone else when you are looking at decision making. It's not something to be scared of."Haldane said recent moves by the federal and B.C. governments to reform the negotiation process have also improved the climate and flexibility to reach settlements.A Recognition and Reconciliation of Rights Policy for Treaty Negotiations in B.C. announced last September features a B.C.-specific policy that Indigenous rights guaranteed in the Constitution cannot be modified, surrendered or extinguished when a treaty is signed.Haldane said federal forgiveness of loans for Indigenous groups to fund treaty negotiations this year also eased the financial burden involved in negotiations.Judith Sayers, president of the 14-member Nuu-chah-nulth Tribal Council on Vancouver Island, said provincial adoption of the bill is a step forward but many are waiting for the federal government to implement UNDRIP legislation.Sayers says five of the tribal council's 14 nations have signed modern treaties and the Ditidaht First Nation is in the final stage, but the eight other nations are not ready to enter treaty talks."I'm assuming as long as we've got the provincial government on side, that is going to make it easier," she said. "The federal government says it's going to pass legislation. They are all promising UNDRIP legislation, whether they get it through is another question."This report by The Canadian Press was first published Dec. 7, 2019. Dirk Meissner, The Canadian Press

  • Get ready for the most active meteor shower of the year
    News
    CBC

    Get ready for the most active meteor shower of the year

    It's that time of the year again, when the night sky lights up with meteors as part of the Geminid meteor shower.This year, the meteor shower runs from Dec. 4 to Dec. 17, peaking on the night of Dec. 13 to 14, when roughly 150 meteors per hour can be seen from a clear, dark-sky location.The Geminids are produced as Earth moves through a stream of debris left over from asteroid 3200 Phaethon. This interactive map shows how Earth passes through the remains shed by the asteroid.While it's possible to see meteors every night, meteor showers increase those chances, sometimes by a lot. That's the case with the Geminids, which can produce more than 100 meteors an hour in ideal conditions, and the other best meteor shower of the year, the Perseids, which occur every August.Meteors are small particles of dust or tiny rocky debris left over from passing comets or asteroids. As they burn up in our atmosphere, they cause a streak of light among the stars. (Meteorites are ones that reach the ground, while meteoroids remain debris in space.)How to see themIf you're hoping to catch them on the peak night of Dec. 13 to 14, there's one slight problem: We have an almost-full moon to contend with.Meteor showers are named after their radiant point, or the constellation from which the meteors appear to originate. In this case, it's the constellation of Gemini. But that's exactly where the moon will lie during the peak night. This composite video shows meteors observed in the skies over Daytona Beach, Fla., during the 2018 Geminid shower.The good news is that you don't have to be looking directly at Gemini to catch the meteors, though the full moon means only the brightest will be visible. Also, the Geminids tend to produce bright fireballs, so those would at least punch through the moonlight.If you're willing to take your chances and want to venture out into the cold night to see how many you can catch, there are some things that you can do to improve your chances.First and foremost, bundle up. There's nothing worse than having cold hands and feet when scouring the sky for some meteors. If you're not warm, you're likely to give up early on. Second, get to a dark-sky location. Moon or not, you increase your chances of seeing faint meteors in dark skies away from light pollution.This leads to probably the hardest task: Turn off your phone and give yourself at least 30 minutes to allow your eyes to adjust to the (relative) darkness.While it may be an obvious tip, don't forget to keep your eyes up and on the sky. These meteors are moving through the atmosphere at 35 kilometres a second — so turn away even for a moment and you might miss one. Finally, be patient. You can try either earlier in the evening, when the moon is low in the east (it rises around 6 p.m. local time), or you can try in the wee hours of the morning.You also don't have to save viewing for the peak night. You can try in the days leading up to the peak or the days following.And it's good to know that while the moon is going to make viewing a bit more challenging this year, next year's show will be moon-free.

  • Test your travel knowledge: What are you allowed to pack before getting on that flight?
    News
    CBC

    Test your travel knowledge: What are you allowed to pack before getting on that flight?

    You have a carton of milk in your carry-on, more than 100 millilitres, and then get to security screening: will it get tossed? Keep reading to learn the answer.It's one of many travel rules that are important to know before you get to the airport.It's not just milk that may stump people, but also items as wide-ranging as batteries, cannabis and cough syrup.In advance of the busy holiday travel season, the Canadian Air Transport Security Authority (CATSA) has laid out some of the items it's confiscated recently as a reminder to travellers who don't want to lose any of their valuables.Among the odd ones: a power drill, a wine-bottle holder made of two fake handguns and an aerosol air horn.For that first item, the power drill, you can travel with it, said CATSA spokesperson Christine Langlois, but you'll need to take it apart first."Lithium batteries should go in [your] carry-on," she said. "The tool itself should go in checked [baggage]. It's really a question of preparing."The wine bottle holder made from guns should also be checked, she explained."They are fake, obviously, but we don't like ammunition or gun replicas in carry on. They don't fly."Aerosols also don't go in your carry-on.Along with large containers of liquids and gels above the 100-ml maximum, they are an item that's most commonly confiscated, Langlois said.As for cannabis, for domestic flights it can go in either your carry-on or checked luggage if you have up to 30 grams. Medical marijuana users are allowed to take up to 150 grams, but will have to show proof of a medical allowance. But even though it's now legal in Canada, cannabis is always prohibited when crossing an international border, even if you're flying from Canada to another place where the drug is legal.You can find these types of answers on CATSA's website or app by searching individual items.If you're taking along Christmas gifts, save the wrapping for your destination: "As much as we like unwrapping gifts, we'd much prefer not to unwrap yours," said LangloisSome items aren't allowed in a carry-on or in checked luggage. They include things like a fuel camping stove or other flammable liquids.If you do get one of those unwanted notes in your luggage from CATSA stating that they've seized an item, don't contact the safety agency to try to retrieve it. It's the airline that takes control of confiscated objects, and you should get in touch with them, instead.Langlois explained that CATSA has an airline representative look at the item before the decision is made whether to seize it.WestJet said it would not make anyone available for an interview for this story, but directed CBC News to its website, which includes a search tool for item categories.Air Canada did not respond to CBC's interview request, but Its website also includes a list of items that can reach 35,000 feet as well as those that must remain on the ground.If you're unsure of whether you can fly with an item and you can't find it on CATSA's app, Langlois said you can send CATSA a picture and description and they'll try to figure it out, though you need to leave time, as they're only available during office hours. "In some cases it requires research, if something is really new. We take the time to research and make a decision."Can you ever take more than 100 ml of liquid in your carry-on?As for that large container of milk: go ahead and pack it in your carry-on if you're travelling with a child two years old or younger. Otherwise, stick to 100 ml or less in a small bottle.It's one of the few exemptions for taking liquid measuring more than 100 ml. Another one is any liquid medicines, such as cough syrup.

  • New health team model will improve patient care, minister pledges
    News
    CBC

    New health team model will improve patient care, minister pledges

    A new health care system unveiled in Ottawa Friday will help free up hospital beds and improve care for patients, including those who need home care and long-term care, the Ontario government says.The Ottawa Health Team is one of 24 such organizations that will initially take over responsibilities from Ontario's Local Health Integration Networks, which are in the process of being dissolved. The new health teams aim to better connect community health care centres with hospitals, meals-on-wheels services, addiction recovery supports and long-term care facilities, said Health Minister Christine Elliott.They will also help hospital patients return to the community, she added."It just makes it a lot easier for people," Elliott said.'Connected, integrated care'Elliott said that eventually, each patient will have a single record and care plan that will help the team address their specific needs — and hopefully provide better care. "The team is going to work together to make sure when somebody is admitted to hospital, for whatever procedure they need to have, they're already looking at their recovery and how they can be returned home," Elliott said.The new system will hopefully also prevent needless trips back to the emergency room departments, Elliott added."What people will notice, when the health team is fully up and running, is that they're having more connected, integrated care [so] that those issues with respect to transitions, will be dealt with," she said."They will have care navigation services and one number to call if they have any concerns."The teams will initially focus on helping frail or elderly people, as well as those with mental health issues and addictions, said Simone Thibault, executive director of the Centretown Community Health Centre."Often those are the people who end up in emergency that could have been better cared for in the community," said Thibault, whose organization is one of the team's initial partners.Thibault said the Ottawa Health Team will first monitor the success of their approach by evaluating "a few hundred" patients, and then expanding until it includes everyone within its region. "We know the system's not working," she said. "It's complicated, and we just want to simplify the system."Skepticism remainsNatalie Mehra, executive director of the Ontario Health Coalition, remains skeptical of the province's strategy. "I've been doing this for 20 years, and governments have been saying that … this plan or that plan or what have you will facilitate moving people out of hospitals," said Mehra, whose group advocates for public health care.She believes patients are already shifted into home care as soon as spots are available, and that they only languish in hospital when long-term care beds don't exist. "We don't see how the health teams are going to actually help the demand and supply problems," said Mehra.She also has questions about oversight, arguing more could be done to make the teams transparent and accountable to both patients and the public."We are quite concerned because [with] the previous iterations of these types of things there was at least public governance. There was a written plan, there was public oversight, there were meetings," she said."The Ontario Health Teams have no such thing. There's no meeting to [attend], there's no minutes of the meeting, there's no clarity around what they're planning."Won't save province moneyOntario Health will continue to be the governing body over the health teams, including Ottawa's, Elliott said. Money will flow from Ontario Health to the local teams, the minister added, and they can organize in anyway they see fit, be it partnerships or corporations."They will have a budget that they will receive for the care of all of the people within their geographic area, and there will be an agreement between Ontario Health and the local team that sets standards and expectations that go along with the money," Elliott said.The new model is not expected to save the province money, Elliott said.The initial partners behind the Ottawa Health Team are: * Bruyère Continuing Care * Carefor Health and Community Services * Carlington Community Health Centre * Centretown Community Health Centre * Ottawa Inner City Health, Inc. * Ottawa Public Health * Pinecrest-Queensway Community Health Centre * Sandy Hill Community Health Centre * Somerset West Community Health Centre * South-East Ottawa Community Health Centre * The Ottawa Hospital

  • 5 tips to get your kids reading, from the head librarian of The Montreal Children's Library
    News
    CBC

    5 tips to get your kids reading, from the head librarian of The Montreal Children's Library

    Tablets and smart phones find their way into children's hands quite easily these days, but that doesn't mean getting kids excited about the printed word has to be a struggle, says Paula Lebrasseur.As a child, reading came naturally to Lebrasseur — the head librarian at The Montreal Children's Library.Her father worked for a publishing house, and she grew up in a home so filled with books that it felt like a library.But that's not the case for everyone. So here are Lebrasseur's professional tips: Get to know what they like Choose books for them (and ideally with them) at the library, the bookstore, a friend's house, according to what they like in life (sports, astronomy, travel), want to learn about, or what they are going through — like starting school or being a teen. A good question to ask is, "What is the last thing that you read and liked?"Then you can search online, ask a bookseller or ask a librarian for similar titles. Eventually, by looking at their books, you will understand better what genre or style they are looking for, what type of illustrations they prefer, and so on.Let them read for funDon't force them to read. You want to create a positive relationship with reading. Manga and comic books are good ways to start.Even if they "don't read but just look at the pictures," the images are a way to learn to make deductions, in order to understand the story. They can be a very important form of reading.  Leave books everywhere Yes, even there! The more accessible books are, the more likely they will get picked up by your kids.Diversity is key Use different techniques to get your kids to read — leave nice notes for them to read, have different sorts of reading materials around the house: posters, magazines, comic books, non-fiction and picture books, novels. Explore interactive e-reading, too.Let them read instructions for your recipes or board games. Read with them, and let them read to you. You can even try fan fiction.Lead by exampleTake this opportunity to revive your passion for reading if it's faded, and speak to your children with enthusiasm about the books you like to read for yourself. They will see that reading is fun and useful for adults as well. Kids learn by mimicking, and reading is a good habit to pick up.In recognition of the important work The Montreal Children's Library does, CBC Montreal has chosen the library as the beneficiary of its 2019 charity drive. Donations can be made online and at the CBC Sing-In.

  • Step inside the works of van Gogh with immersive exhibit in Montreal
    News
    CBC

    Step inside the works of van Gogh with immersive exhibit in Montreal

    A new immersive art exhibit in Montreal lets visitors feel like they're stepping into the works of Vincent van Gogh.Brushstrokes appear several feet wide, as more than 200 works, such as Starry Night and The Yellow House, are blown up and split into panels, giving visitors a 360-degree view of the paintings projected onto the walls and floor.Annabelle Mauger, one of the artistic directors behind the exhibit, titled Imagine Van Gogh, says she tests this type of exhibition by seeing how her young children react to it."When I saw them just running [at] the image, running into the paintings, I think, this is the most fantastic thing I can do," she told CBC News.Mauger said she wanted to create a space where people could experience van Gogh's art in ways traditional museums don't allow. Classical music plays as you move around the warehouse space, where you can reach out and touch the simulated canvas or sit on the floor and watch the artwork swirl around you.That feeling of being surrounded by the artwork is building on French photographer Albert Plécy's concept of "image totale," which Maugler studied while in Provence, France at the Cathédrale d'images."This is something you need to live to understand," she said.The Montreal showing of Imagine Van Gogh is its North American debut, with 40,000 tickets sold before it opened at the Arsenal Contemporary Art centre on Dec. 5.But not everyone is a fan of such immersive art exhibitions, which seek to attract audiences to contemplate works of art by presenting them in an accessible format.Artist Joseph Nechvatal, reviewing a similar digital art exhibition in Paris titled Van Gogh, Starry Night, decried it as "a nasty bit of metaphorical necrophilia" that degrades van Gogh's daring works.He called the show "one of the greatest banalizations of painting I have ever seen, matched only by van Gogh kitchen hand towels now being sold around town."In that exhibit, the paintings came to life through the use of computer-generated animation. But in Imagine Van Gough, they retain their static quality as they're projected on the walls, which lets the art express motion, Mauger says, while still remaining immobile."I don't want the birds flying, you know," said Mauger. "I don't want to see the [self]-portrait of van Gogh smoking. No, for me, this is nonsense."Hrag Vartanian, the Canadian-born editor-in-chief and co-founder of the influential art criticism website Hyperallergic, is more generous than Nechvatal in his assessment of the growing trend of immersive digital art shows."A lot of these artworks are sometimes disappointing when you're in a museum and you realize it's much smaller than you imagined it, or there's a huge crowd and you don't get a moment of contemplation you were hoping for," he said in an interview from New York.Vartanian believes these large-scale projections can make a viewer feel closer to the artist and the work than you otherwise might get from standing in a museum, seeing the original."It takes away the pretension, which I think is one of the barriers museums have with the public; [people] still see them as this kind of rarefied place that sort of holds up a certain idea of our culture. And I think anything we can do to break that down is a good thing," he said.Imagine Van Gogh continues at the Arsenal Contemporary Art centre until Feb. 2, 2020.

  • Here's how many Canadians get a holiday bonus
    News
    CBC

    Here's how many Canadians get a holiday bonus

    More than 60 per cent of Canadian workers will get some kind of reward from their employer this holiday season, but for most, it won't be the kind they're looking for — money.A new survey conducted on behalf of human resources software company ADP Canada found that of the 61 per cent of workers who receive something extra from their employers this time of year, just 15 per cent get a financial bonus.The online survey of 1,562 employed Canadians was conducted between Nov. 1 and 4, and has a margin of error of 2.5 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.Unsurprisingly, 54 per cent of respondents said cash would be their first choice over, say, a Starbucks gift card or an underwhelming employee dinner. Alas, those whose employers do something to show staff appreciation for during the festive season are most likely to get a holiday party (40%), followed by extra time off (28%), some sort of gift (16%) or a charitable activity (7%).One-third of employers don't provide any end-of-year acknowledgement at all.Atlantic Canadians most likely to see the moneyThere were a few notable regional differences, said Heather Haslam, vice-president of marketing for ADP Canada. "Quebecers like to party," she said, noting that 51 per cent of respondents from that province said their place of work would hold a holiday bash, compared to the national average of 40 per cent.Those in Atlantic Canada were the most likely to say they'll be getting a financial bonus this year, with 23 per cent looking forward to something extra on their paycheque, compared to 15 per cent nationwide.People from British Columbia were most likely to get extra vacation time, while those in Manitoba and Saskatchewan were the most likely to say their employer does nothing at all to mark the holidays."There seems to be a bit of a disconnect between employees and employers," said Haslam.The results suggest that employers should think about tailoring their offerings to the individual, she said.'Create a more engaged team'Bosses might opt to provide individual employees with a choice to either attend the company holiday party or putting that money toward a charity, said Haslam. Or provide the option to choose between a financial bonus or some extra time off."That's creating an environment where people's individual preferences are understood and acknowledged, and it helps to create a more engaged team," she said.Glenn Zujew, executive vice-president at Toronto-based Klick Inc., a group of companies that includes the world's largest independent health marketing company, said the organization goes big with employee incentives this time of year.The company, which was the recipient of 11 best employer awards in 2019, aims to "surprise and delight" this time of year.The company holds a town hall to reflect on the past year, followed by a splashy party where all staff spouses are invited, including those who are flown in from other parts of the country. I don't have to book any vacation time off, and I get to spend all that time at home. \- Ian Marquette, Halifax tech worker and father of three"Sometimes people need to stay a little bit later and we want to make sure we thank the spouses for those kinds of things," said Zujew.At this year's party, management announced that it's organized an upcoming early screening of the new Star Wars movie. In addition to lively charitable activities, including the production and release of its annual holiday video that features staff as actors, the office will close between Christmas Day and New Year's Day so employees can have the time off without having to dip into their vacation time.Each staff member also receives a personalized, coffee table-style yearbook that captures photos and details about each individual's year.Things like financial bonuses are handled on an individual basis, said Zujew.For Ian Marquette, who started working as product designer at software company Proposify in Halifax this year, it was a delight to discover that the office will be closed for two full weeks over the holidays. Being off for the entire school break will give him time with his three kids and remove any child-care challenges the family would normally face."It's great. I don't have to book any vacation time off, and I get to spend all that time at home," said Marquette. "I'm really happy. It's very fortunate."Although the holiday closure didn't come up during the recruitment process, Marquette said he believes the company could have made it a big selling point. "I've never worked anywhere that does that."Although Haslam said it's always good to show employees appreciation, the holidays in particular offer an opportunity to pause, reflect and acknowledge the contributions of staff, which is particularly critical for engagement and retention in a tight labour market."People want to feel valued," she said.

  • A snack made of an invasive fish is coming to Toronto. Can Asian carp be far behind?
    News
    CBC

    A snack made of an invasive fish is coming to Toronto. Can Asian carp be far behind?

    Move over beef; come January there will be a new jerky in Toronto, made entirely from an invasive fish species found in Mexico. And its introduction has got some people thinking Asian carp could also show up on the menu sometime soon. The snack, El Diablito, is the brainchild of Sam Bordia, who wanted to do something with the scaly suckermouth catfish after seeing how it took over Mexican riverways. "It's done a lot of damage in terms of fishermen's livelihood because the native species they normally catch can't find food to eat because [the suckermouth catfish] is eating all their food," said Bordia, head of operations for a business called Acari Fish. There's a lot of stigma around the hard-shelled bottom-feeder, mainly because of the way it looks, says Bordia, but the meat is quite versatile and can be used as a substitute for ground beef or turkey. "The goal of our company is really to try and create an economic ecosystem around the fish that has previously been viewed as a scourge in southern Mexico," said Bordia. El Diablito, which means "the little devil" in Spanish, will be launching in Canada before anywhere else and the introduction of the dried fish product is already raising the question whether other invasive species can be turned into food.The big one under the microscope is Asian carp, an invader that's got authorities on the alert on both sides of the U.S.-Canada border. It has already infiltrated many bodies of water in the U.S. and is heading north. Canada's Invasive Species Centre is on the lookout. U.S. stores sell Asian carp "It's something that we're very worried about. They have huge appetites and they out-compete native species for food and resources," said Rebecca Schroeder, who is the centre's aquatic invasive species liaison. The fish hasn't made it into the Great Lakes yet and although it is edible, Schroeder warns against adding it to the Canadian diet. "We don't want to create a market for something that isn't here because it can increase the likelihood of introduction into the environment," said Schroeder. In parts of the U.S. where the fish is present, some restaurants and fish markets have it on the menu. Dirk's Fish and Gourmet Shop, located in Chicago, has been selling Asian carp since 2009. Since the fish has a lot of bones, the shop's owner and head fishmonger Dirk Fucik says the best way to prepare it is to grind the meat so that it can be formed into patties. Even though the shop gives out free burgers during the summer, the carp is still surrounded by a lot of stigma. "We only sell about 500 pounds of it a year," said Fucik. "When people think of carp we think about dirty bottom feeding muddy kind of fish… but the Asian carp actually feeds on plankton, so it's a clean fish." As for El Diablito, Bordia hopes launching it in Canada where there's no stigma attached to the fish will help sales.

  • Attention travellers: Despite recent ruling, U.S. border agents can still easily search your phone
    News
    CBC

    Attention travellers: Despite recent ruling, U.S. border agents can still easily search your phone

    Travellers entering the United States, be aware: American border agents can still easily search your cellphone.That's despite a much-publicized U.S. court ruling against border guards searching electronic devices without declaring prior grounds for suspicion.Two Canadian immigration lawyers warn that last month's ruling from the U.S. Federal Court in Massachusetts is extremely limited in its effect — at least for now."My usual advice to my clients would not change," said Andrea Vaitzner, a Montreal-based immigration lawyer at Norton Rose Fulbright."I would still advise them not to save anything on their devices they would not want a [U.S. Customs and Border Protection] officer to read. I would suggest that they clean their phones and laptops and to save documents remotely in cloud storage."She said U.S. border agents are not allowed to check documents that are stored remotely.Limited rulingOn Nov. 12, a Federal Court in Boston ruled that searching a phone or laptop without reasonable grounds for suspicion is a violation of the U.S. Constitution's Fourth Amendment. The decision sided with a group of plaintiffs that included 10 U.S. citizens and a Haitian-born U.S. resident, the American Civil Liberties Union and the pro-privacy Electronic Frontier Foundation.Plaintiffs alleged that border agents arbitrarily demanded access to their devices at U.S. airports and Canada-U.S. border checkpoints, including the U.S. customs preclearance zone at Toronto's Pearson Airport, the Ontario-New York checkpoint, and Quebec checkpoints with Vermont and New York.One of the plaintiffs was a lawyer, whose device contained confidential exchanges with clients. Another plaintiff was a journalist, who was concerned agents would read his confidential discussions with sources.Their suit came following evidence of a spike in U.S. border searches of travellers' personal devices.The Electronic Frontier Foundation celebrated the ruling, saying travellers could now cross the border without fear of being searched without grounds, because the court had put an end to the practice.Not so fast, say two Canadian lawyers. Vaitzner and Toronto lawyer Henry Chang warn that the scope of the ruling remains limited.They say its findings don't apply outside Massachusetts.Chang, a lawyer with the Dentons firm and an expert on Canada-U.S. immigration issues, called the case a positive step in the protection of privacy rights.But, he said, "Decisions of a federal district court are not binding in any other district."In practical terms, Chang said, that means the verdict wouldn't carry immediate weight far beyond Boston's Logan Airport."So a U.S. [Customs and Border Protection] officer at Toronto International Airport is not bound by this decision. Neither is a USCBP officer at the Detroit-Windsor land border, or even Los Angeles Airport," he said. "None of these locations are within the [Federal Court] District of Massachusetts."He said he foresees only two ways this decision ends up becoming binding on all U.S. customs officers everywhere.One is if the decision is appealed to the U.S. Supreme Court and gets affirmed by the high court.The second is if U.S. Customs and Border Protection acknowledges the validity of the Nov. 12 decision and decides to incorporate it into its own guidance to staff."If this occurs, the guidance will apply at all ports of entry and preclearance offices," Chang said."Clearly, we are not at that point yet."From the U.S. government's perspective, searches of electronic devices are essential to enforcing the law and protecting Americans, and affect less than .01 per cent of travellers who enter the country.What is 'reasonable suspicion'?The suit originally asked the court to require that border agents obtain a warrant to search an electronic device. But the court rejected that request.Instead, the plaintiffs won on a narrower question: the court said border officers must articulate grounds for "reasonable suspicion" of illicit activity, if they want to perform a warrantless search.As Vaitzner points out, the definition of that term is sufficiently vague to easily justify searches."If a traveller appears nervous, is that reasonable suspicion?" she said. "I do not think it will take much for a USCBP officer to form a reasonable suspicion and search a traveller's phone or laptop."

  • Not-so-wily coyotes spotted in Arboretum
    News
    CBC

    Not-so-wily coyotes spotted in Arboretum

    Visitors to Ottawa's Arboretum are now being warned to be on the lookout for coyotes.A new sign posted beside a pathway behind HMCS Carleton, between Dow's Lake and the Arboretum, reads: "Caution: Coyotes are a natural part of our ecosystem and usually avoid humans. Encounters are very rare. To avoid problems, please keep pets on a leash. Be cautious as coyotes can look like dogs. Do not approach or feed them."There have been several confirmed sightings of the normally elusive canines on the nearby Central Experimental Farm.CBC headed out to ask joggers, dog walkers and other visitors if they've seen coyotes, wily or otherwise, in the area.'Yeah, they're here'Blair Tucker said he saw two coyotes recently. "Yeah, there's here," he said.But Tucker's not worried about his dog, Buddy, a golden retriever-Burmese cross. "They're gonna run from us. Coyotes like fast food. They grab and go. There was a young one and an older one, and they saw us and they just ran."Samantha Fonberg hasn't seen coyotes at the Arboretum, but she wonders whether her much smaller dog, Rupert, a  cocker spaniel-poodle-shih tzu mix, might be vulnerable to the opportunistic predators."I am a little worried, now that we're having this conversation. What I've heard is that they're getting more comfortable around people," Fonberg said.Zach Langer, 14, often walks his white German shepherd, Casper, in the park. Casper likes to run in the wide-open spaces, and "to chase butterflies, squirrels and laser pointers."Langer doesn't think there are coyotes in the park, but if there were? "[Casper would] probably run away."David Arnold was out walking with his son, Sebastian, 4. "It doesn't faze me. We come from B.C.," Arnold said. Melina Jefferson has been walking around the Arboretum for years and has never seen a coyote. But the sign didn't surprise her."Maybe there was [a coyote] seen and someone made a complaint so they needed to post a sign. That kind of sounds classic."Denis Dupont has been walking the Arboretum paths almost daily since 2012, and just noticed the sign."Yeah, and I've never spotted a coyote. Lots of dogs, but never coyotes. Maybe people have seen dogs that aren't on leash thinking they were coyotes," he offered.Confirms suspicions The reports of coyote sightings come as no surprise to Mark Hooper, whose black lab-mix, Arya, loves to chase squirrels in the Arboretum."I was wondering why my dog got scared in the bush. A couple of days back, we were walking along and she got really scared and jolted back toward me. Something that's not a dog was in there. So it's confirming some suspicions I've had, actually, that there's something else in there."Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada put up eight signs at "frequently-visited Central Experimental Farm locations" to inform people about the presence of coyotes. A statement said there have been no reported incidents, but staff are aware of sightings, and told CBC in a statement the department is taking a page from the National Capital Commission's book.The NCC put up signs after a coyote attacked a dog near McCarthy Park in 2018.Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada says it's monitoring the situation "to ensure public safety." It's warning people the animals can be aggressive, and are not to be approached or fed.

  • Immersive Van Gogh show opens in Montreal
    CBC

    Immersive Van Gogh show opens in Montreal

    A closer look at immersive art as Imagine Van Gogh makes its North American debut in Montreal.

  • Funding boost crucial to Yellowknife's Young Parent Program, says organizer
    News
    CBC

    Funding boost crucial to Yellowknife's Young Parent Program, says organizer

    Getting through high school is hard for most teenagers, let alone for those with a newborn baby.But as a teenager in Courtenay, B.C., Taylor Major did just that, thanks in large part to a special program at her high school for young parents."My daughter was two weeks old and I would go to class and then I would come back to the daycare — it was sort of a daycare and support program for teen parents," said Major."It was really the reason that I was able to graduate, and graduate on time with my peers."Now she's helping young mothers and fathers in Yellowknife do the same. It's our first our first donation of any kind. \- Taylor MajorMajor started the Young Parent Program at École Sir John Franklin High School last year. The free program runs every Thursday from 3:30 to 4:00 p.m. and is open to pregnant students and young parents who are attending any high school in Yellowknife. Last week, the program got a funding boost from the Yellowknife chapter of 100 Men Who Give a Damn. The group meets several times a year and each member donates $100 to a local community cause. The donation typically amounts to about $10,000.'Living two different lives'As a student and a parent, young moms and dads are "living two different lives," said Major. This makes it hard for them to relate to other people their age."Things like the volleyball tournaments that they used to go to, those may not be the reality anymore," she said. "Without a support program in the school, without a daycare in the school, without that support, often school is the first thing that teen parents will drop."The Young Parent Program offers that support. Teachers, friends and family of the young parents are welcome to participate. Student parents are encouraged to bring their schoolwork and, if they want, they can connect with a nurse.There are also snacks and activities."We finished making baby beaver mittens, which was really cool because then the parents had that opportunity to create something for their child, and … that sense of accomplishment," said Major. Getting the word outMajor said when she moved to Yellowknife, she was alarmed to learn there was no program for teen parents in high school.The greatest challenge right now is getting the word of the program out to young people who might benefit from it, she said. The money from 100 Men Who Give a Damn will help with that. Major said it will go toward marketing, as well as healthy snacks and program materials."[It's] going to go just such a long way. It's our first our first donation of any kind," she said.Major hopes that next year, student parents who take part in the program will be awarded school credit."Getting them through the door is often that first step that's so big," she said."But once they're there … It sort of creates that sense of belonging in our school, and that's really what we want to foster, but we just have to get them there."

  • Keep calm and shop on: A retail worker shares tips on surviving the holiday season
    News
    CBC

    Keep calm and shop on: A retail worker shares tips on surviving the holiday season

    Jennifer Ridgway says Charlottetown's downtown core has changed a lot over the years but there's one thing that remains the same: the holidays are a busy time.  Ridgway has been helping customers with their shopping at her Charlottetown shop, Moonsnail Soapworks, for about 24 years. She also owns Luna, located inside the Confederation Court Mall. "It's a short season and it's intense," she said. While Ridgway looks forward to the holidays, as a retailer, she also prepares herself for the season's potential challenges. "I would say in general there might be higher levels of anxiety around the holidays and sometimes that translates to people not being their most calm and relaxed selves when they're shopping," she said. Empathy and patienceRidgway has many holiday seasons under her belt and with her years of experience, she has some advice for both shoppers and retail workers. "I guess I would just ask the customers to remember that we're all human and we're all trying to, you know, get through this and and have a good day," she said.  Take 30 seconds or a minute more to … really relate to each other. — Jennifer RidgwayShe also said that exercising patience and empathy are key elements to making it through this time of year unscathed. "Everybody can put themselves in the shoes of somebody who, you know, had been on their feet all day," Ridgway said. She also said dealing with rushed customers can at times be a challenge and can lead to emotions escalating, resulting in negative interactions between customers and workers. "Take 30 seconds or a minute more to … really relate to each other. That's kind of what the holidays are all about." 'Communication'As for retail workers, Ridgway advises they make sure to prioritize self-care to avoid feeling burned out. "Make sure you're getting time for yourself and getting your feet up," she said. Keeping up good communication with your boss or manager is also important, Ridgway said.  They call them door-crasher specials for a reason —  it was literally people crashing through the doors. — Jim Cormier, Atlantic director, Retail Council of Canada"I let my staff to just have a quick walk around the mall, or go take a bit of a longer break, or go get yourself a tea," she said. "Make sure that you're having good communication with the people you're working with or working for so that everybody can get through this and you can keep your mental health intact." Jim Cormier, the Atlantic director for the Retail Council of Canada, said Canadians may have noticed more shopping events like Black Friday over the past five or six years.That's been done by many retailers in an effort to spread the stress and anxiety those sales cause workers and consumers."You'll remember that back in the day, before Black Friday even started, there used to be these massive Boxing Day sales and lineups and, you know, there were at times some unfortunate things that would happen with people — they call them door-crasher specials for a reason —  it was literally people crashing through the doors," Cormier said.He said Black Friday events, which can happen over a period of a week or sometimes even two, allow for holiday shopping to be done in a more orderly way that avoids unruly, massive crowds. "You may have to wait in some longer lineups, but [we] encourage everyone to be patient and respectful and you'll be able to get what you need for your loved ones." More P.E.I. news

  • Treasure hunter finds Chipman's first neon sign buried in snow in woods
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    CBC

    Treasure hunter finds Chipman's first neon sign buried in snow in woods

    It's been nearly 70 years since the Chipman Grill and Taxi sign went missing from the small village 70 kilometres east of Fredericton.But in mid-November, two local treasure hunters found the weathered sign covered by snow in the woods outside the city."I came upon the sign and we were just sort of looking around, and there was snow on top of it at the time," said Rob Allaby, who was hiking with his brother when they found it."We just thought we'd lift it up … and it was a beautiful old double-sided neon sign that said Chipman Grill and Taxi on it."Allaby has made a pastime of searching for lost treasure. This summer, he found a 1965 Southampton High School grad ring in Killarney Lake and tracked down the family of the late owner. He returned it to the graduate's mother in July, 50 years after it was lost. He resolved to do it all again — but this time it was not only personal, it was a piece of village history."When you find a sign or something that belongs to somebody else and then you can return it to them after they thought it was lost for forever, and [it's] something that sort of takes them back to a loved one, it's a great feeling," he said.After a series of Facebook messages, phone calls and online searches, Allaby discovered the Chipman Grill belonged to Holden Sears in the 1950s."I was blindsided when they called me on the telephone," said Mike Sears, Holden's grandson. Mike lives in Durham Bridge with his father, Leslie.Mike said he remembered that his grandfather had a restaurant in Chipman, but he called his father to be sure."He said, 'Yes. Where is [the sign]?' So I said, 'Well, Robert Allaby has it and he's willing to bring it to us if you want it. And Dad said, 'Yeah. Bring it.' So it's here."Leslie remembers putting the sign up in 1949 with his father. Chipman did have a taxi service in those days, although the village of 1,200 doesn't have one now. It was great to see it because it brought back a lot of memories when we just youngsters down there. \- Leslie Sears, son of restaurant owner"It was, if I'm not mistaken, one of the first neon signs in Chipman, for that size anyway," Leslie said, who's now 87.Leslie said the Sears family really didn't know the sign disappeared."That was brought to my attention in later years," he said."It was either stolen or what, I don't know. I don't know whether it was removed from the restaurant before it burned, or anything about that because we had already sold it."The grill was sold out of the family around 1956, and it eventually burned down.Leslie said he didn't think he'd ever see the sign again. "I thought it's probably gone, junk or whatever. Back then, I suppose a lot of that stuff went for salvage, figured if you could get a few dollars out of it, they'd sell it."Leslie's son Mike has no memories of the sign but he was shocked to see it. "I was surprised it was so big," Mike said, adding that the sign stands over a metre tall and is at least a metre and a half long."The holes in it I thought were bullet holes, but then I was told later that there were neon lights in it so I said, 'That's something for a small place like that and the age of the sign.'"Mike said they offered the sign to the Chipman Heritage Centre but they didn't want it.Instead, the sign is going to be raised at Leslie's brother's home on Grand Lake, where the family will get to see it at the reunion next summer."It was great to see it because it brought back a lot of memories when we just youngsters down there," Leslie said.

  • 'People are so lost': Westcourt Place residents frustrated, desperate
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    CBC

    'People are so lost': Westcourt Place residents frustrated, desperate

    Forced out of their homes more than three weeks ago and facing the holidays staying with friends, family or in motels ... the tenants of Westcourt Place are getting desperate. Diane Khoury and James White are two tenants who are increasingly frustrated with not knowing when they'll get to go home. They created a resident's association to organize meetings"The difference between two weeks and 20 weeks ... our lives are incredibly uncertain," said White. "It's hard to know what to do next."Khoury said tenants are "couch surfing" and scattered all over the place."It's pretty sad you have to bounce between places. You can't get comfortable," said Khoury. The resident's association meets for the third time Saturday morning after the building stopped paying for residents to stay in motel rooms on Dec. 5."They're on their own now," said White. "We're all just trying to pick up the pieces."According to Khoury, tenants aren't allowed in the building at all, even into their own units. They had a few chances early on to pick up their personal items, but those were rushed circumstances."Not everyone got the communication [on when you could go back in]," said White. "And those of us who did, most of our time was unplugging appliances and cleaning out your fridge."Some residents haven't been back in their units at all and have been told they can't return anymore, despite appointments made through insurance companies for entrance. "There's a cap on [tenants insurance]. We're running out and we can't make a plan," said White, who has been staying in a motel through his insurance. Khoury does not have insurance and her family had to split up amongst other friends and family members for accommodations. White said some people, facing homelessness, are getting desperate ."We're basically slowly pushing 200 people into the city services," said White. "I don't know what the plan is to deal with that.'Khoury said the least the apartment owners could do would be to give them a timeline on being able to return. White said the fire marshall should be providing answers. "People are so lost," said Khoury. "We're trying to get more accommodations and services ... shelter is number one."University of Windsor and St. Clair College students who live at Westcourt Place can contact the school for potential accommodation options.