Meghan Markle Wore a Stunning Cape Dress for the Queen’s Star-Studded Birthday

Emma Stefansky
Queen Elizabeth II marked her 92nd year with a concert at the Royal Albert Hall, featuring Tom Jones, Kylie Minogue, and more.

To celebrate the Queen’s 92nd birthday, Meghan Markle stepped out in a navy blue cape dress to match fellow royal family members Prince Harry, Prince Charles, and Lady Louise Windsor at a concert at the Royal Albert Hall in London on Saturday night.

Prince William was also in attendance, riding in the car with Harry and Markle, but his wife Kate Middleton, pregnant with their third child, opted to stay home. Markle’s dress was a £1,150 Stella McCartney number with a cape attached to the shoulders, and she also wore matching blue heels and carried a Naeem Khan Armory Zodiac Clutch, also a pretty penny at $1,490, decorated with constellations of sparkly stones.

The Queen wore gold to the concert, which began with a performance by Tom Jones of his hit “It’s Not Unusual.” During the concert, Harry took the stage to wish his mum a Happy Birthday: “Tonight we are celebrating the Queen’s Birthday, but, Your Majesty, if you do not mind me saying, you are not someone who is easy to buy gifts for.”

The concert also included a performance by pop singer Kylie Minogue and a banjo group led by Ed Balls, Frank Skinner, and Harry Hill, to which the Queen was seen nodding along. Prince Harry announced that the Queen’s Commonwealth Trust has officially launched, to “provide a platform for those working to make a difference in their communities across 53 countries.”

The Queen normally celebrates two birthdays a year—her actual birthday on April 21, and a second official birthday, usually falling on the second Saturday in June, which includes a Trooping the Color military parade in central London.

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