Moncton launches survey to make city more inviting for cyclists, pedestrians

·2 min read
More and more people have been discovering the joy and efficiency of cycling during the pandemic. (Adam Killick - image credit)
More and more people have been discovering the joy and efficiency of cycling during the pandemic. (Adam Killick - image credit)

The City of Moncton is looking at ways to make navigating the city more attractive to cyclists and pedestrians.

The city has posted an active transportation survey on its website that focuses on linking trails to different neighbourhoods within the city.

"It's knowing where people are and where they want to go," said Catherine Dallaire, general manager of recreation and culture for the city.

The survey is trying to find out where residents want to travel by bike, and identify gaps in infrastructure that make it difficult to do so.

The city also wants to know what is preventing cyclists and pedestrians from accessing a trail in their neighbourhood or across town.

"Where do you find the most challenging areas to commute or to cycle or to walk?" she said. "What infrastructure is needed to allow you to … take your bicycle to work or walk to work."

Inspiring more people to walk, cycle

This is phase two of the city's active transportation plan, which was adopted in 2003.

The plan will look at the width of sidewalks and where they will be located. It will also look at potential bike lanes, trails and programs to support everyday active transportation.

She said the city is hopeful the new plan will inspire more people to walk or cycle to work or local restaurants for the next 10 years.

"We have to step back and look at the entire city as a network," she said.

"We know how people move by car. But we don't know how they move yet by bicycle."

The deadline to fill out the city's survey is Thursday at 12 p.m. and feedback will be included in the city's active transportation plan.

Improving transit service in Saint John

In Saint John, a cycling enthusiast is trying to encourage more people to get out and cycle or walk, along with finding new ways to mitigate climate change.

"I'd really like to see people appreciating Saint John transit the same way we appreciate other community services," said Nick Cameron.

The avid cycler is the new chair of the city's transit and parking commission.

Nick Cameron and his young daughter often bike around the city of Saint John.
Nick Cameron and his young daughter often bike around the city of Saint John.(Submitted by Nick Cameron)

"Something that's accessible to all of us is how we choose to get around in the run of a day," he said. "Bikes are pretty accessible."

Cameron said he's looking forward to finding a way to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. He's hoping to do this by introducing better transit services for people.

He's also hoping for collaboration between the city and the Saint John Transit Commission, an organization that's independent from the city.

"It's something that people really should be thinking about," he said.