Montreal man guilty of criminal harassment receives conditional discharge

·3 min read
Adamo Bono, left, has been granted a conditional discharge by Quebec Court judge Flavia Longo. He appeared in Montreal court Wednesday with his defence lawyer Jeffrey Boro (right). (CBC - image credit)
Adamo Bono, left, has been granted a conditional discharge by Quebec Court judge Flavia Longo. He appeared in Montreal court Wednesday with his defence lawyer Jeffrey Boro (right). (CBC - image credit)

Adamo Bono, a 41-year-old Montreal man accused of criminal harassment, has been sentenced to a conditional discharge with two years probation, during which he must reside and receive treatment at a mental health facility.

Bono pleaded guilty earlier this month to criminally harassing Anastasia Boldireff, 31, in 2019, when he followed and harassed her on two different occasions while she was walking near Concordia University's downtown campus.

Bono had previously pleaded not guilty to the criminal charge in 2019.

At the time of the events, Boldireff was a student working for the university. She reported the incidents and later discovered Bono had been found not criminally responsible on two charges of sexual assault on two different women less than a year earlier, in December 2018.

Prosecutors and the defence lawyers representing Bono had submitted a joint sentencing recommendation of a two-year conditional discharge, requiring Bono to continue undergoing treatment. Details of that treatment are covered by a publication ban.

Judge accepts joint submission

In a Montreal courtroom Wednesday morning, Quebec Court judge Flavia Longo accepted the joint submission in delivering Bono's sentence.

Boldireff has been an outspoken victim since she requested a publication ban on her identity be removed earlier on in the legal process, so that she could speak to media openly.

After reciting her victim impact statement to the court on April 4, Boldireff spoke to reporters outside the courtroom, saying she felt a lack of agency over the nearly three years of legal proceedings against Bono.

CBC
CBC

"I think that the way in which victims are represented in society is that of an hysterical woman with empty thoughts in their head. And I think that being able to speak to the press has given me a sense of a voice," Boldireff said at the time.

Wednesday, Boldireff told CBC News she agrees with the judge's sentencing decision and finds it reasonable but is still processing it.

"I'm also baffled and a little bit overwhelmed," she said. "I still have a lot of concerns about what will happen in two years.… Will the public be safe?"

Jeffrey Boro, one of the criminal defence lawyers representing Bono, said he was relieved the judge had agreed that there are enough "safeguards in place so that [Bono] has the support he needs not to reoffend."

Boro said his client had been lucky to find mental health support resources, considering the dearth of them in Quebec and the rest of Canada.

Boro said he was sympathetic to the harm Boldireff experienced.

"At the end of the day, hopefully, she's going to understand that the offence that was committed was not done by somebody who wanted to be mean or malicious," the lawyer said.

"It was done by somebody who has issues and who is trying to deal with them."

In her victim impact statement, Boldireff said her life had been derailed by the incidents, which eventually pushed her to leave the province — then the country altogether — as well as lose her job and the support services it provided.

She said the incidents and ensuing legal proceedings made her lose her sense of self and purpose.

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