More Sask. young adults lived with parents last year than 2016, new census data shows

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Sydney Gust is one of many Saskatchewan residents who lived with their parents in 2021. Twenty-six per cent of young adults aged 20 to 34 in Saskatoon lived with at least one parent in 2021, as did 28 per cent in Regina, according to new census data.   (Submitted by Sydney Gust - image credit)
Sydney Gust is one of many Saskatchewan residents who lived with their parents in 2021. Twenty-six per cent of young adults aged 20 to 34 in Saskatoon lived with at least one parent in 2021, as did 28 per cent in Regina, according to new census data. (Submitted by Sydney Gust - image credit)

Canada's latest census found the number of young people living with their parents had grown in Saskatchewan.

In fact, two cities in the province had some of the highest growth, percentage-wise, of young adults living at home with their parents in the census year of 2021, compared to five years ago.

Twenty-six per cent of young adults (aged 20 to 34) in Saskatoon lived with at least one parent in 2021, and 28 per cent did in Regina. This was an increase of three and two percentage points respectively compared to the 2016 census.

Regina resident Sydney Gust was only able to move out of her parent's home in June of this year.

The 25-year-old psychology masters student said she couldn't afford to move out before that, even with a part-time job as an educational assistant.

"I work and all of my money that I make goes directly to pay for my education, so I have no leftover funding to pay for things like rent or groceries," Gust said.

Gust now lives with her partner.

"So I was able to cover the cost of living expenses without going into extreme debt," she said.

Living with parents fastest growing arrangement in Alberta

Red Deer, Alta., had Canada's most relative growth of young adults living at home from 2016 to 2021 — up seven percentage points to 27 per cent. Saskatoon, Regina and Red Deer are still below the national average of young adults living with their parents (35 per cent), which has been unchanged since 2016.

Statistics Canada analyst Claudine Provencher said more young people lived at home in Saskatchewan and Alberta because those two provinces experienced the largest declines in economic activity in the first year of the pandemic, mainly due to lower energy prices.

"So in these situations, having job losses, fewer job opportunities or fewer hours of work, young adults will tend to stay in the parental home in these circumstances," Provencher said.

Living with parents is most prevalent in Ontario, particularly Oshawa, where nearly half (49 per cent) of young adults lived with their parents in 2021, according to Statistics Canada data.

However, living with roommates is the fastest growing household type in Canada, the latest census shows.

WATCH | More Canadians living with roommates, new census data shows

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