N.B. COVID-19 roundup: 14 new cases, 2 more deaths

·3 min read

Two more New Brunswickers have died from COVID-19, bringing the total number of deaths related to the pandemic to 16.

Public Health confirmed Wednesday that someone 70 to 79 in the Edmundston region and another person 70 to 79 in the Saint John region died as a result of underlying complications, including COVID-19.

The person in the Saint John region, Zone 2, lived at Lily Court at the Shannex Parkland.

"On behalf of all New Brunswickers, I extend sincere condolences to the family and friends of these two people," Health Minister Dorothy Shephard.

Public Health also reported 14 new cases on Wednesday. The cases break down in this way:

Moncton region, Zone 1, two cases:

  • an individual 20 to 29

  • an individual 40 to 49

Saint John region, Zone 2, one case:

  • an individual 30 to 39

Fredericton region, Zone 3, five cases:

  • an individual 19 or under

  • two people 50 to 59

  • two people 60 to 69

Edmundston region, Zone 4, six cases:

  • two people 19 or under

  • an individual 30 to 39

  • an individual 40 to 49

  • an individual 50 to 59

  • an individual 60 to 69

All of these people are self-isolating and their cases are under investigation.

CBC News
CBC News

The number of confirmed cases in New Brunswick is 1,175, including 327 active cases. Since Tuesday, 24 people have recovered, for a total of 831 recoveries.

Six people with COVID are in hospital, and two of them are in intensive care.

A total of 191,709 tests have been conducted, including 2,056 since Tuesday's report.

Hockey New Brunswick cancels provincial tournaments

The 2021 Hockey New Brunswick provincial tournaments, originally scheduled to be held throughout the province from March 26 to 28, have been cancelled.

In a news release Wednesday, Hockey New Brunswick referenced Public Health guidelines that currently prohibit team sport tournaments.

"With the safety of all members being of utmost importance, the hosting of provincial tournaments this season is not feasible," the organization said.

It noted the cancellation will give leagues more time to plan the current season and provide play for all teams.

"All league championships being held will need to follow a play-off format or single elimination game format as opposed to tournaments."

Robert F. Bukaty/Associated Press
Robert F. Bukaty/Associated Press

Just over the border, a much different situation

With 1.7 times the population of New Brunswick, Maine has seen 35 times the number of deaths from COVID-19, and its case rate to date is 32 times higher than New Brunswick's.

In fact, things are so bad with our neighbours to the west and south that very little followup is being done with positive cases since Nov. 25.

Before that date, according to the state's website, health officials "attempted multiple followup calls with every identified case of COVID-19 in Maine in order to assess whether their isolation period was completed."

Since Dec. 5, however, officials only follow up with those under 19, over 64, and those who meet certain criteria, including first responders and health-care workers, those living or working in congregate settings, or associated with a school or child-care facility.

Other cases are contacted only if resources allow.

As of Wednesday, the state has had 38,170 cases to date and 562 deaths.

Potential exposure notification for Air Canada flight

Public Health has identified a positive case in a traveller who may have been infectious on Jan. 14 while on the following flight:

  • Air Canada Flight 8906, on Jan. 14, from Montreal to Moncton, departed at 9:19 p.m.

What to do if you have a symptom

People concerned they might have COVID-19 symptoms can take a self-assessment test online.

Public Health says symptoms shown by people with COVID-19 have included:

  • A fever above 38 C.

  • A new cough or worsening chronic cough.

  • Sore throat.

  • Runny nose.

  • Headache.

  • New onset of fatigue, muscle pain, diarrhea, loss of sense of taste or smell.

  • Difficulty breathing.

In children, symptoms have also included purple markings on the fingers and toes.

People with one of those symptoms should:

  • Stay at home.

  • Call Tele-Care 811 or their doctor.

  • Describe symptoms and travel history.

  • Follow instructions.