N.B. woman concerned about fate of baby moose separated from mother

·3 min read
The baby moose has been separated from its mother since Thursday on a rural New Brunswick road.  (Submitted/Margaret Williston - image credit)
The baby moose has been separated from its mother since Thursday on a rural New Brunswick road. (Submitted/Margaret Williston - image credit)

A woman living near Miramichi, N.B., is frustrated that no one can help a baby moose separated from its mother for the last few days.

Margaret Williston said the calf hasn't seen its mother since Thursday. A car spooked the adult moose near a creek at the end of Hortons Creek Road, where Williston resides.

Since then, Williston has been trying to get help for the baby moose that's been crying throughout the night and pacing aimlessly around her property looking for its mother.

"It even came up my steps trying to get in," Williston said Saturday. "It's so hungry."

She said the calf has been looking for attention — and food.

"It'll come over and try to attach itself to you looking for a nipple," Williston said about the lost calf that's been visiting her front door.

The calf has been returning to Margaret Williston's property looking for its mother.
The calf has been returning to Margaret Williston's property looking for its mother. (Submitted/Margaret Williston)

Williston said she contacted the Department of Natural Resources and Energy Development twice for guidance.

Wildlife officials went to see the calf and told Williston that it's best to leave the moose in the area so the mother will know where to find it.

But after a few days of not seeing the mother, Williston is concerned for the calf's safety.

"It's a baby, it's a baby, it's crying, it wants something to eat," she said.

Williston contacted the Atlantic Wildlife Institute, a rehab facility for displaced animals, near Sackville, but was told there's nothing it can do.

Barry Rothfuss, executive director at the facility, said a provincial regulation prevents them from taking the animal. Any call concerning moose or deer is directed to the province, he said.

Barry Rothfuss, executive director of the Atlantic Wildlife Institute, said it's frustrating not being able to help the displaced calf.
Barry Rothfuss, executive director of the Atlantic Wildlife Institute, said it's frustrating not being able to help the displaced calf. (Pierre Fournier/CBC)

Rothfuss said he gets at least a dozen calls every year with something similar.

"It's frustrating to have to give an answer that you can't help when you know you have the capacity to help," he said.

Williston said she wishes there was someone who could help the moose, instead of leaving it on its own — stressed and looking for food.

"There should be some kind of resource that we can reach out, have them come pick up the animal and take it some place where it's going to be looked after properly."

Williston said she and her husband guided the moose back to the creek in hopes of reuniting it with its mother. But it was back in her yard a few hours later.

She said she fed the calf some milk as a last resort because she couldn't listen to it cry any longer.

"I know you're not supposed to but I can't just let it starve to death in front of me," she said. "It's been three days now. This baby is getting weaker by the minute and it's so heartbreaking."

CBC News contacted the Department of Natural Resources and Energy Development on Saturday, but no one responded.